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Re: [shs-talk] Window Orientation....

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  • Cheryl Martin
    Wow, Cool thanks this explains a lot of things.   Sincerely, Cheryl Martin BS b.a, CMT Project Manager Out on A Limb Massage LLC. & Skyline Project
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 18 10:18 AM
      Wow, Cool thanks this explains a lot of things.
       
      Sincerely,

      Cheryl Martin BS b.a, CMT
      Project Manager

      Out on A Limb Massage LLC. &
      Skyline Project Management.com
      ~Projects made Simple~

      Minnesota USA

      763-245-4243
       
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      From: LarenCorie <larencorie@...>
      To: smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, April 18, 2013 10:12 AM
      Subject: [shs-talk] Window Orientation....

       
      Posted by: "MotherLodeBeth" MotherLodeBeth@...

      > Nice thing about small houses on wheels is you can move
      > them around so the windows in winter get the solar heat and
      > light from the south and west sides.

      Hi Beth;

      West facing windows are not a good choice for the heating
      season. For instance, using Topeka, Kansas (center of the
      nation) as an example, during January the net Solar gain
      (gain minus heat loss) for an unshaded, double glazed,
      clear glass, South facing window will be about 296BTU
      per ft², per day. For the same window, facing West, there
      will be a 264BTU/ft²-day heat loss. During the "shoulder
      months" when West facing windows get more sunlight,
      temperatures are warmer and only having South facing
      windows still does better. Even in March (sun path the
      same as late September) South facing windows still get
      38% more sunlight than West, while their heat loss is
      the same. So, even in March, West facing windows
      gain little heat. In February, they lose 91BTU/ft²-day,
      while South facing windows gain 339. The December
      West window heat loss is 259, while the South window
      gain is 251. For November, West loses 37, and South
      gains 443. March, West 171 gain, South 381 gain.
      Even October, West 391 gain, South 691 gain. Also
      note that this comparison is based on equal heat loss,
      while the real world circumstance is that West facing
      windows generally have far more heat loss, because
      they are exposed to the predominant heating season
      winds, and there is a strong warm sheltering in the
      areas along South walls of houses. There is also a
      factor of sunlight reflection, that is not part of these
      calculation. It further reduces the West windows
      Solar gain, in Winter.

      Then, during the cooling season, West facing windows
      cause awful overheating, while South facing windows
      have not only the advantage of easy shading, but also
      simply receive far less light, even if not shaded, at all,
      and what does reach the glass, is greatly reflected off.
      For instance, In July while a West facing window will
      gain 860BTU/ft²-day, a totally unshaded South facing
      window will gain only 500, and shading in July is easy.
      A shaded South facing window get only 350 at most
      (usually less).

      > Yet come summer turn the house so the side with
      > the most windows are facing north and west so
      > the place stays cooler.

      Let's first look at your North facing window idea.
      It is easy to understand why you could think that might
      be a good idea. In July (using Topeka again, since
      it is "average" for the US) while a shaded South facing
      window can gain 350BTU per ft² per day, North facing
      windows are not shaded by overhangs, and unshaded
      North facing windows will gain 390BTU/ft²-day, which
      is 11½% more July Solar heat gain, than a South facing
      window. So, unfortunately, that idea does not work,
      without "wingwalls" or other vertical shading, which
      in this case, would destroy the Winter performance.
      (and would have other faults)

      West facing windows, in Summer, can be virtually
      hellish. In July, they are also very difficult to shade, and
      we are looking at a heat gain of 860BTU/ft²-day. That
      is something you definitely want to avoid. So, the idea
      of turning a tiny house to face its greatest window area
      any direction other than South, during July (or June, or
      August) will cause the house to be hotter (considering
      standard overhangs, or comparable provisions). Facing
      the window West in Summer will cause severe overheating.

      BTW....this is based on NREL climate data. Results
      will be similar for all Northern Hemisphere locations..
      (Reverse North and South for Southern Hemisphere)
      While East facing windows have an advantage, during
      shoulder months, of early morning Solar gain, to take
      the chill off, their net Solar gain is very close to that of
      West facing windows. Therefore, their lack of Winter
      Solar gain, and also their undesirable Summer Solar
      gain, are about the same as for West facing windows.

      -Laren Corie-
      Natural Solar Building Design and
      Solar Heating/Natural Cooling/Energy
      Efficiency Consultation Since 1975
      www.ThermalAttic.com (many new
      photos and pages, coming soon)

      Read my Solar house design articles in:
      -Energy Self-Sufficiency Newsletter-
      www.essnmag.com

      Home base-LittleHouses YahooGroup
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LittleHouses/

      Founder-WoodGas - Power from wood
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WoodGas

      Founder-RefrigeratorAlternatives YahooGroup
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RefrigeratorAlternatives



    • robc
      ... A bit of off the deep end over analysis again. A movable tiny house can be oriented for passive solar gain and even with large windows on both sides can
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 18 10:49 AM
        --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, "LarenCorie" <larencorie@...> wrote:
        >
        > Posted by: "MotherLodeBeth" MotherLodeBeth@...
        >
        > > Nice thing about small houses on wheels is you can move
        > > them around so the windows in winter get the solar heat and
        > > light from the south and west sides.
        >
        > Hi Beth;
        >
        > West facing windows are not a good choice for the heating
        > season. For instance, using Topeka, Kansas (center of the
        > nation) as an example, during January the net Solar gain
        > (gain minus heat loss) for an unshaded, double glazed,
        > clear glass, South facing window will be about 296BTU
        > per ft², per day. For the same window, facing West, there
        > will be a 264BTU/ft²-day heat loss. During the "shoulder
        > months" when West facing windows get more sunlight,
        > temperatures are warmer and only having South facing
        > windows still does better. Even in March (sun path the
        > same as late September) South facing windows still get
        > 38% more sunlight than West, while their heat loss is
        > the same. So, even in March, West facing windows
        > gain little heat. In February, they lose 91BTU/ft²-day,
        > while South facing windows gain 339. The December
        > West window heat loss is 259, while the South window
        > gain is 251. For November, West loses 37, and South
        > gains 443. March, West 171 gain, South 381 gain.
        > Even October, West 391 gain, South 691 gain. Also
        > note that this comparison is based on equal heat loss,
        > while the real world circumstance is that West facing
        > windows generally have far more heat loss, because
        > they are exposed to the predominant heating season
        > winds, and there is a strong warm sheltering in the
        > areas along South walls of houses. There is also a
        > factor of sunlight reflection, that is not part of these
        > calculation. It further reduces the West windows
        > Solar gain, in Winter.
        >
        > Then, during the cooling season, West facing windows
        > cause awful overheating, while South facing windows
        > have not only the advantage of easy shading, but also
        > simply receive far less light, even if not shaded, at all,
        > and what does reach the glass, is greatly reflected off.
        > For instance, In July while a West facing window will
        > gain 860BTU/ft²-day, a totally unshaded South facing
        > window will gain only 500, and shading in July is easy.
        > A shaded South facing window get only 350 at most
        > (usually less).
        >
        > > Yet come summer turn the house so the side with
        > > the most windows are facing north and west so
        > > the place stays cooler.
        >
        > Let's first look at your North facing window idea.
        > It is easy to understand why you could think that might
        > be a good idea. In July (using Topeka again, since
        > it is "average" for the US) while a shaded South facing
        > window can gain 350BTU per ft² per day, North facing
        > windows are not shaded by overhangs, and unshaded
        > North facing windows will gain 390BTU/ft²-day, which
        > is 11½% more July Solar heat gain, than a South facing
        > window. So, unfortunately, that idea does not work,
        > without "wingwalls" or other vertical shading, which
        > in this case, would destroy the Winter performance.
        > (and would have other faults)
        >
        > West facing windows, in Summer, can be virtually
        > hellish. In July, they are also very difficult to shade, and
        > we are looking at a heat gain of 860BTU/ft²-day. That
        > is something you definitely want to avoid. So, the idea
        > of turning a tiny house to face its greatest window area
        > any direction other than South, during July (or June, or
        > August) will cause the house to be hotter (considering
        > standard overhangs, or comparable provisions). Facing
        > the window West in Summer will cause severe overheating.
        >
        > BTW....this is based on NREL climate data. Results
        > will be similar for all Northern Hemisphere locations..
        > (Reverse North and South for Southern Hemisphere)
        > While East facing windows have an advantage, during
        > shoulder months, of early morning Solar gain, to take
        > the chill off, their net Solar gain is very close to that of
        > West facing windows. Therefore, their lack of Winter
        > Solar gain, and also their undesirable Summer Solar
        > gain, are about the same as for West facing windows.
        >
        > -Laren Corie-
        > Natural Solar Building Design and
        > Solar Heating/Natural Cooling/Energy
        > Efficiency Consultation Since 1975
        > www.ThermalAttic.com (many new
        > photos and pages, coming soon)
        >
        > Read my Solar house design articles in:
        > -Energy Self-Sufficiency Newsletter-
        > www.essnmag.com
        >
        > Home base-LittleHouses YahooGroup
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LittleHouses/
        >
        > Founder-WoodGas - Power from wood
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WoodGas
        >
        > Founder-RefrigeratorAlternatives YahooGroup
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RefrigeratorAlternatives
        >
        A bit of off the deep end over analysis again.
        A movable tiny house can be oriented for passive solar gain and even with large windows on both sides can utilize shades for seasonal adjustment.A simple outer wall bamboo curtain rolled down mitigates heat gain,is cheap to install and limits having to move the tiny trailer mounted house in most cases to only a few months a year if at all.
        Do you live in a real trailer mounted tiny house i.e. under 200 sq ft? Or do you just pontificate on something of which you really have no real world experience?
        You don't need a lot of thermal mass to have and enjoy the benefits of passive solar. You don't need a majority of you windows facing south. You can exhaust heat to adjust comfort.You can shade via other methods than overhangs etc. to maintain interior temps at your comfort level.
        Robert
        The Tiny Bungalow
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