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Turning off refrigerator overnight

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  • Angela Leslee
    Just a follow up to a letter I wrote just last week I believe. When I said that I turned my fridge off overnight to save on solar power, Jack (I think it was)
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 1, 2012
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      Just a follow up to a letter I wrote just last week I believe.  When I said that I turned my fridge off overnight to save on solar power, Jack (I think it was) advised me not to do that, best to keep it running all the time.  He never said why, but as if to punctuate that, the next day everything in the freezer had thawed, and the fridge wasn't that cold either...... Sigh!....... Engine was still running, just not blowing cold air...... When I couldn't get hold of my appliance repair guy, I decided to turn it off for ten minutes, then turn it back on again...... Works for my cell phone :-) low and behold, it worked for the fridge too :-).  Repair guy finally called, and when I explained, he confirmed what Jack said, was something to do with the compressor getting stuck, or something like that.

      Moral of the story, leave your fridge turned on :-)

      Angela
      Hawaii
    • jerry freedomev
                                      Hi Angela and All,  
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 2, 2012
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                                        Hi Angela and All,
         
                                               One can turn the frige off if one has really good insulation and turn down the temp in the day to overcool it while power is available from say PV.
         
                                               On boats we do what is called a cold plate system where the engine runs a compressor with the cooling coils are in a solution of saltwater or other cold storing solution like antifreeze perferably one that isn't poisonous ;^P  They are generally run 1-2hrs/day then coast until the next day.
         
                                             A close way is just put in say 2liter soda bottles with similar solutions or other cool storing like standard  Ice packs one uses for lucnh boxes, etc in or next to the coils.  If goos insulation, 2-4'' say 4'' on bottom, 3'' on the sides and 1'' on top if built as a top loading box could do this plus cut the total electricity needed by 75%,  .
         
                                             Or just freeze water in a freezer and put it in the frige section if one has such.
         
                                              Many things like eggs don't really need a frige, just turn them over every day or coat them with vasoline.  Check out cruising boat sites/groups for how they store food for long voyages.  I don't  cool my Miracle Whip, just only use the top and don't stick a knife, etc into it, just scrape off the top and good for a month in summer and a couple in winter. This works in Fla.
         
                                                                                                                     Jerry Dycus
         
        From: Angela Leslee <angelaleslee@...>
        To: "smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com" <smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, December 2, 2012 2:18 AM
        Subject: [shs-talk] Turning off refrigerator overnight



        Just a follow up to a letter I wrote just last week I believe.  When I said that I turned my fridge off overnight to save on solar power, Jack (I think it was) advised me not to do that, best to keep it running all the time.  He never said why, but as if to punctuate that, the next day everything in the freezer had thawed, and the fridge wasn't that cold either...... Sigh!....... Engine was still running, just not blowing cold air...... When I couldn't get hold of my appliance repair guy, I decided to turn it off for ten minutes, then turn it back on again...... Works for my cell phone :-) low and behold, it worked for the fridge too :-).  Repair guy finally called, and when I explained, he confirmed what Jack said, was something to do with the compressor getting stuck, or something like that.

        Moral of the story, leave your fridge turned on :-)

        Angela
        Hawaii




      • boulderwhitewater
        I know this won t work in Hawaii, but in the winter I freeze gallon milk jugs with water outside on cold nights and use to fill excess space in refrig &
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 18, 2012
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          I know this won't work in Hawaii, but in the winter I freeze gallon milk jugs with water outside on cold nights and use to fill excess space in refrig & freezer. My frig hardly runs at all in the winter.














          --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, Angela Leslee wrote:

          Just a follow up to a letter I wrote just last week I believe. When I said
          that I turned my fridge off overnight to save on solar power, Jack (I think
          it was) advised me not to do that, best to keep it running all the time.
          He never said why, but as if to punctuate that, the next day everything in
          the freezer had thawed, and the fridge wasn't that cold either......
          Sigh!....... Engine was still running, just not blowing cold air...... When
          I couldn't get hold of my appliance repair guy, I decided to turn it off
          for ten minutes, then turn it back on again...... Works for my cell phone
          :-) low and behold, it worked for the fridge too :-). Repair guy finally
          called, and when I explained, he confirmed what Jack said, was something to
          do with the compressor getting stuck, or something like that.

          Moral of the story, leave your fridge turned on :-)

          Angela
          Hawaii
        • Angela Leslee
          I finally had to have the guy out who converted the fridge to solar for me. Took us 5 looooong days to coordinate that, he lives 2 hours away. Because my
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 18, 2012
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            I finally had to have the guy out who converted the fridge to solar for me.  Took us 5 looooong days to coordinate that, he lives 2 hours away.    Because my freezer is a self defrost, it's a little more complicated , and he said it's best to leave it on all the time.  So I guess it's best to look into your individual fridge, before making the decision to turn it off.  Since most regular solar fridges are not self defrost (none that I know of) , I'm probably a bit of an isolated situation.

            And no, that system with the milk jugs would not work for me :-)

            Angela

            On Tuesday, December 18, 2012, boulderwhitewater wrote:
             

            I know this won't work in Hawaii, but in the winter I freeze gallon milk jugs with water outside on cold nights and use to fill excess space in refrig & freezer. My frig hardly runs at all in the winter.

            --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, Angela Leslee wrote:

            Just a follow up to a letter I wrote just last week I believe. When I said
            that I turned my fridge off overnight to save on solar power, Jack (I think
            it was) advised me not to do that, best to keep it running all the time.
            He never said why, but as if to punctuate that, the next day everything in
            the freezer had thawed, and the fridge wasn't that cold either......
            Sigh!....... Engine was still running, just not blowing cold air...... When
            I couldn't get hold of my appliance repair guy, I decided to turn it off
            for ten minutes, then turn it back on again...... Works for my cell phone
            :-) low and behold, it worked for the fridge too :-). Repair guy finally
            called, and when I explained, he confirmed what Jack said, was something to
            do with the compressor getting stuck, or something like that.

            Moral of the story, leave your fridge turned on :-)

            Angela
            Hawaii

          • Jack
            Angela, How did they convert the fridge to Solar? 110v to 12 v? We are totally off grid and run everything on 110v. Using an inverter, I priced out the
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 18, 2012
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              Angela,  

              How did they convert the fridge to Solar?   110v to 12 v?   We are totally off grid and run everything on 110v.   Using an inverter,  I priced out the 12 v and propane powered stuff and ran the numbers, it was cheaper to just invert power to 110v in the long run.   that was for our situation.

              The trick with freezers is different,  Keep them FULL even if it is water jugs. The thermal mass is a big saver.    If you have a freezer and a fridge, if the power goes out you can transfer freezer items to the fridge and keep your food from spoiling.  

              Jack


              -----Original Message-----
              From: Angela Leslee <angelaleslee@...>
              To: smallhousesocietyonline <smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tue, Dec 18, 2012 9:30 am
              Subject: Re: [shs-talk] Re: Turning off refrigerator overnight

               
              I finally had to have the guy out who converted the fridge to solar for me.  Took us 5 looooong days to coordinate that, he lives 2 hours away.    Because my freezer is a self defrost, it's a little more complicated , and he said it's best to leave it on all the time.  So I guess it's best to look into your individual fridge, before making the decision to turn it off.  Since most regular solar fridges are not self defrost (none that I know of) , I'm probably a bit of an isolated situation.

              And no, that system with the milk jugs would not work for me :-)

              Angela

              On Tuesday, December 18, 2012, boulderwhitewater wrote:
               
              I know this won't work in Hawaii, but in the winter I freeze gallon milk jugs with water outside on cold nights and use to fill excess space in refrig & freezer. My frig hardly runs at all in the winter.

              --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, Angela Leslee wrote:

              Just a follow up to a letter I wrote just last week I believe. When I said
              that I turned my fridge off overnight to save on solar power, Jack (I think
              it was) advised me not to do that, best to keep it running all the time.
              He never said why, but as if to punctuate that, the next day everything in
              the freezer had thawed, and the fridge wasn't that cold either......
              Sigh!....... Engine was still running, just not blowing cold air...... When
              I couldn't get hold of my appliance repair guy, I decided to turn it off
              for ten minutes, then turn it back on again...... Works for my cell phone
              :-) low and behold, it worked for the fridge too :-). Repair guy finally
              called, and when I explained, he confirmed what Jack said, was something to
              do with the compressor getting stuck, or something like that.

              Moral of the story, leave your fridge turned on :-)

              Angela
              Hawaii

            • aeblequilter
              Oh, great idea. Thanks for sharing. I have an off grid piece of property with a river I plan to spend a month at in the late summer with my family (after the
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 18, 2012
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                Oh, great idea. Thanks for sharing.

                I have an off grid piece of property with a river I plan to spend a month at in the late summer with my family (after the mosquito population has died down). This will be the first year we stay longer than a weekend. We plan to take the items that don't have to be refrigerated but are nice cold and can get wet (sealed bottles of juice, etc.), place them in a mesh bag attached to a tree with a length of rope, and plop the whole bag in the river. That way we get cool refreshing juice without having to keep purchasing ice blocks for the cooler.

                I wouldn't recommend it for food items however, because you'll just be asking for wildlife visitors! That will have to be stored in our car I'm afraid.

                Tammy

                --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, "boulderwhitewater" wrote:

                I know this won't work in Hawaii, but in the winter I freeze gallon milk jugs with water outside on cold nights and use to fill excess space in refrig & freezer. My frig hardly runs at all in the winter.
              • Jack
                Just don t feed the bears... they like to open cars for food. Bring a rope and hoist your food off the ground at night. River is great for a micro Hydro
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 18, 2012
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                  Just don't feed the bears... they like to open cars for food.   Bring a rope and hoist your food off the ground at night.   

                  River is great for a micro Hydro power plant.   way cool and pretty cheap to produce electricity.   Yahoo has a MICROHYDRO GROUP you could get some great pointers.   When that time comes.

                  Jack


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: aeblequilter <cokotlc@...>
                  To: smallhousesocietyonline <smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Tue, Dec 18, 2012 12:12 pm
                  Subject: [shs-talk] Re: Turning off refrigerator overnight

                   
                  Oh, great idea. Thanks for sharing.

                  I have an off grid piece of property with a river I plan to spend a month at in the late summer with my family (after the mosquito population has died down). This will be the first year we stay longer than a weekend. We plan to take the items that don't have to be refrigerated but are nice cold and can get wet (sealed bottles of juice, etc.), place them in a mesh bag attached to a tree with a length of rope, and plop the whole bag in the river. That way we get cool refreshing juice without having to keep purchasing ice blocks for the cooler.

                  I wouldn't recommend it for food items however, because you'll just be asking for wildlife visitors! That will have to be stored in our car I'm afraid.

                  Tammy

                  --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, "boulderwhitewater" wrote:

                  I know this won't work in Hawaii, but in the winter I freeze gallon milk jugs with water outside on cold nights and use to fill excess space in refrig & freezer. My frig hardly runs at all in the winter.

                • robc
                  Frozen goods are much better left in a suitable container covered in burlap and a simple drip bottle hung above to drip water down onto the burlap and let
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 18, 2012
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                    Frozen goods are much better left in a suitable container covered in burlap and a simple drip bottle hung above to drip water down onto the burlap and let evaporation cooling keep the food frozen. Immersed in a stream is just like thawing a frozen turkey,they thaw much quicker when in water. Free cheap evaporation coolers,will keep your frozen goods frozen and you chilled milk cold for several days.

                    --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, Jack wrote:

                    Just don't feed the bears... they like to open cars for food. Bring a rope and hoist your food off the ground at night.


                    River is great for a micro Hydro power plant. way cool and pretty cheap to produce electricity. Yahoo has a MICROHYDRO GROUP you could get some great pointers. When that time comes.


                    Jack



                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: aeblequilter
                    To: smallhousesocietyonline
                    Sent: Tue, Dec 18, 2012 12:12 pm
                    Subject: [shs-talk] Re: Turning off refrigerator overnight





                    Oh, great idea. Thanks for sharing.

                    I have an off grid piece of property with a river I plan to spend a month at in the late summer with my family (after the mosquito population has died down). This will be the first year we stay longer than a weekend. We plan to take the items that don't have to be refrigerated but are nice cold and can get wet (sealed bottles of juice, etc.), place them in a mesh bag attached to a tree with a length of rope, and plop the whole bag in the river. That way we get cool refreshing juice without having to keep purchasing ice blocks for the cooler.

                    I wouldn't recommend it for food items however, because you'll just be asking for wildlife visitors! That will have to be stored in our car I'm afraid.

                    Tammy

                    --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, "boulderwhitewater" wrote:

                    I know this won't work in Hawaii, but in the winter I freeze gallon milk jugs with water outside on cold nights and use to fill excess space in refrig & freezer. My frig hardly runs at all in the winter.
                  • Jack
                    Its also a good time to bring in the idea of DRY ICE... Check out your welders supply. They carry the stuff. Read up on how it is to be handled. We go
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 18, 2012
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                      Its also a good time to bring in the idea of DRY ICE...  Check out your welders supply.  They carry the stuff.   Read up on how it is to be handled.   We go jeeping into the back country and still have frozen ice cream by day 6.

                      Jack


                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: robc <robcrissinger@...>
                      To: smallhousesocietyonline <smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Tue, Dec 18, 2012 4:09 pm
                      Subject: [shs-talk] Re: Turning off refrigerator overnight

                       
                      Frozen goods are much better left in a suitable container covered in burlap and a simple drip bottle hung above to drip water down onto the burlap and let evaporation cooling keep the food frozen. Immersed in a stream is just like thawing a frozen turkey,they thaw much quicker when in water. Free cheap evaporation coolers,will keep your frozen goods frozen and you chilled milk cold for several days.

                      --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, Jack wrote:

                      Just don't feed the bears... they like to open cars for food. Bring a rope and hoist your food off the ground at night.


                      River is great for a micro Hydro power plant. way cool and pretty cheap to produce electricity. Yahoo has a MICROHYDRO GROUP you could get some great pointers. When that time comes.


                      Jack



                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: aeblequilter
                      To: smallhousesocietyonline
                      Sent: Tue, Dec 18, 2012 12:12 pm
                      Subject: [shs-talk] Re: Turning off refrigerator overnight





                      Oh, great idea. Thanks for sharing.

                      I have an off grid piece of property with a river I plan to spend a month at in the late summer with my family (after the mosquito population has died down). This will be the first year we stay longer than a weekend. We plan to take the items that don't have to be refrigerated but are nice cold and can get wet (sealed bottles of juice, etc.), place them in a mesh bag attached to a tree with a length of rope, and plop the whole bag in the river. That way we get cool refreshing juice without having to keep purchasing ice blocks for the cooler.

                      I wouldn't recommend it for food items however, because you'll just be asking for wildlife visitors! That will have to be stored in our car I'm afraid.

                      Tammy

                      --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, "boulderwhitewater" wrote:

                      I know this won't work in Hawaii, but in the winter I freeze gallon milk jugs with water outside on cold nights and use to fill excess space in refrig & freezer. My frig hardly runs at all in the winter.

                    • Angela Leslee
                      Sorry for the delay in answering Jack, my days are packed full right now. My fridge was converted from 110V to 12V. It s even hard wired into my house, no
                      Message 10 of 10 , Dec 19, 2012
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                        Sorry for the delay in answering Jack, my days are packed full right now.

                        My fridge was converted from 110V to 12V.  It's even hard wired into my house, no plug.  But I believe there are 2 small inverters inside it, one for the fridge, one for the freezer.  I feel really fortunate, as I'm not sure how many other people are doing this........ however.......... when the guy who converted it came to fix it (first time I'd met him in person), turns out he's in his late 60's, early 70's...........and as far as I know he's the only one who can fix it......... fortunately he appears hale and hearty, so I'll just think good thoughts :-)

                        Aloha, and Merry Christmas to all (that's Mele Kalikimaka in hawaiian)
                        Angela

                        On Tue, Dec 18, 2012 at 8:38 AM, Jack <dirtdoctorjak@...> wrote:
                         

                        Angela,  


                        How did they convert the fridge to Solar?   110v to 12 v?   We are totally off grid and run everything on 110v.   Using an inverter,  I priced out the 12 v and propane powered stuff and ran the numbers, it was cheaper to just invert power to 110v in the long run.   that was for our situation.

                        The trick with freezers is different,  Keep them FULL even if it is water jugs. The thermal mass is a big saver.    If you have a freezer and a fridge, if the power goes out you can transfer freezer items to the fridge and keep your food from spoiling.  

                        Jack


                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: Angela Leslee <angelaleslee@...>
                        To: smallhousesocietyonline <smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Tue, Dec 18, 2012 9:30 am
                        Subject: Re: [shs-talk] Re: Turning off refrigerator overnight

                         
                        I finally had to have the guy out who converted the fridge to solar for me.  Took us 5 looooong days to coordinate that, he lives 2 hours away.    Because my freezer is a self defrost, it's a little more complicated , and he said it's best to leave it on all the time.  So I guess it's best to look into your individual fridge, before making the decision to turn it off.  Since most regular solar fridges are not self defrost (none that I know of) , I'm probably a bit of an isolated situation.

                        And no, that system with the milk jugs would not work for me :-)

                        Angela

                        On Tuesday, December 18, 2012, boulderwhitewater wrote:
                         
                        I know this won't work in Hawaii, but in the winter I freeze gallon milk jugs with water outside on cold nights and use to fill excess space in refrig & freezer. My frig hardly runs at all in the winter.

                        --- In smallhousesocietyonline@yahoogroups.com, Angela Leslee wrote:

                        Just a follow up to a letter I wrote just last week I believe. When I said
                        that I turned my fridge off overnight to save on solar power, Jack (I think
                        it was) advised me not to do that, best to keep it running all the time.
                        He never said why, but as if to punctuate that, the next day everything in
                        the freezer had thawed, and the fridge wasn't that cold either......
                        Sigh!....... Engine was still running, just not blowing cold air...... When
                        I couldn't get hold of my appliance repair guy, I decided to turn it off
                        for ten minutes, then turn it back on again...... Works for my cell phone
                        :-) low and behold, it worked for the fridge too :-). Repair guy finally
                        called, and when I explained, he confirmed what Jack said, was something to
                        do with the compressor getting stuck, or something like that.

                        Moral of the story, leave your fridge turned on :-)

                        Angela
                        Hawaii


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