Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [a-w-h] rooftop WT

Expand Messages
  • Matt
    I know that you re talking to Hugh here, but this you can still go green by putting a rooftop VAWT up in LA is one of the silliest things said on this
    Message 1 of 63 , Apr 30, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      I know that you're talking to Hugh here, but this "you can still go ""green"" by putting a rooftop VAWT up in LA" is one of the silliest things said on this list in quite a while. I never thought I'd see the day when just hearing the word green would make me cringe.

      If someone really wants to do something helpful, instead of simply consuming more resources to make themselves feel good about their own excesses, and they live in a place with a class 1 wind resource, go with PV - or better yet, with solar thermal! Small wind turbines can be great, provided they are used in a place with the wind to make them operate usefully. LA is not that place (unless you happen to live in the San Gabriel Mountains and on a ridge)

      Matt
      ---- Jeffrey Lim <wildjef@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hugh,
      > You just hit the nail on the coffin, positively speaking.
      >
      > You stated correctly when you asked if anyone has a good story on vertical axis and rooftop WTs. There are substaintially, Hugh...as Doug said.
      >
      > Engineering doesn't have to be specific, it should be manipulative like working with clay models.
      >
      > If you live in a city such as LA you can still go "green", hence, the rooftop WT comes so handy even the output is way under your requirements.
      >
      > The good thing about it is it's not visually intrusive, very safe and easy access. I seen a few around the US and the people who used it are pretty happy folks. That's a good story from my point of view. They're not technical people who loved to see their electrical bills reduced even by a quarter. Renters of 'Flats' building are happier too.
      >
      > I don't personally know much about it but I would like to get one...or built one myself and tandem that to my exisiting systems.
      >
      > You got to keep an open mind...generally there's more than two ways to solve a problems.
      >
      > Here's a clue about engineering; Today's plumbers in the US don't use a lot of heavy tools such as monkey wrench or not a all.
      >
      > Jeff
      >
      >
      > Date: Tue, 29 Apr 2008 21:40:03 +0100To: wildjef@...; etsang@...: hugh@...: Re: [a-w-h] optionsCC: awea-wind-home@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Sorry if this has all got a bit too intense but I will try to lighten up a bit :-)
      >
      >
      > At 15:58 -0700 28/4/08, Jeffrey Lim wrote:
      > When you reiterated options that's what it comes down to for the clients. Most of the things I put up are options so they have a choice for their needs whether it's cost, looks or codes requirements, etc.
      >
      > Yes of course there are options for what you can do. If you can't spend a lot and you are non technical then you can maybe spend a little and get a toy for the roof that will produce little or no energy and probably cause a nuisance but will be great fun. Take care!
      >
      > For more detail to substantiate the word nuisance see the following links:
      > http://www.oceansolar.com/winex.html
      > http://www.oceansolar.com/rejwintur1.html
      > http://www.warwickwindtrials.org.uk/8.html
      >
      >
      > If anyone other than Doug has a good story about a successful rooftop wind project that produces useful energy and makes people happy then I want it please. Doug's one doesn't count because his story is about a concrete commercial building in Tehachapi which is not a typical site. Also of course it is his own turbine... OK, sorry that's not fair, Doug's one counts - they all count - bring them flooding in please.
      >
      > What we need on this list are exciting and positive stories about vertical axis and rooftop turbines so that I can shut up and go away and stop being negative all the time. The snag is that they have to be real stories, and not computer generated graphics and projections. Ideally, they ought to also include lots of data such as XXX kWh per day and such and such windspeed.
      >
      > These exciting and encouraging stories will help people to choose which of the many available vertical axis and/or rooftop small wind turbines to buy and which entrepreneur is to be fast tracked to fame and riches. Hopefully the said entrepreneurs will not be the only people submitting stories to the list.
      >
      > I am waiting :-)--
      >
      > Hugh PiggottScoraig Wind Electrichttp://www.scoraigwind.co.uk
      > _________________________________________________________________
      > Spell a grand slam in this game where word skill meets World Series. Get in the game.
      > http://club.live.com/word_slugger.aspx?icid=word_slugger_wlhm_admod_april08
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • woodard214
      It may be that the electricity most nearly affordable to the average homeowner will come from a megawatt wind turbine sited where strong winds blow.
      Message 63 of 63 , May 2, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        It may be that the electricity most nearly affordable to the average
        homeowner will come from a megawatt wind turbine sited where strong
        winds blow.

        Technologies mature. There haven't been any revolutionary changes in
        aviation in the last fifty years, though there have been incremental
        improvements.

        Mass production could reduce the cost of electricity from small wind
        turbines, but the market for them is limited by the fact that most
        people do not live where there is most energy in the wind and they
        never will as long as most of us who might buy wind turbines live in
        cities. Buildings reduce the local wind energy resource.

        Also, there is no point in producing noisy or unreliable or
        unproductive wind turbines cheaply, and no one will pay for them.

        Many people will continue to be subsistence farmers living in valleys
        where the land is productive but the wind is weak.

        Doug Woodard
        St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada



        --- In awea-wind-home@yahoogroups.com, Jeffrey Lim <wildjef@...>
        wrote:
        >
        [snip]
        >
        > My point is there is no limit...Technology upgrades every six
        years. It's not about "my telescope is better than your telescope or
        my WT is better than your WT..."
        >
        > You have to make this system affordable to the average homeowners
        otherwise we or you are just a bunch of elites.

        [snip]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.