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Re: [a-w-h] water pump - submersible or indoor?

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  • solarone@charter.net
    Hi there Elizabeth, Since your suction easily falls into the working range of a standard jet pump, you will save a lot of money and time to go that way over a
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 29, 2006
      Hi there Elizabeth,

      Since your suction easily falls into the working range of a standard jet pump, you will save a lot of money and time to go that way over a sub pump. Submersibles are way better than jet pumps in high lift applications, but you don't have to worry about it. You might consider going with a Grundfos constant pressure pump if you don't need a lot of storage.

      Matt Tritt


      ---- LadyBug <lady-bug@...> wrote:
      > Hello:
      > I am going to be installing a 1Kw Bergey next year which will also
      > have some PV panels on the tower as part of the system.
      > Now, I am digging my well (a dug well 12 to 16 feet depending on
      > ledge encountered, not an artesian well) and had planned on using an indoor
      > electric water pump. A friend mentioned that it is easier to push water
      > than to pull it and advised me to use a submersible pump. Any comments from
      > the group on the efficiency of one vs the other would be appreciated.
      > Also, there was an article in a recent issue of Home Power about
      > using AC vs. DC appliances. What would you recommend if I used a
      > submersible pump? The water line from the well to the foundation is about
      > 120 feet, there are only two of us using minimal water per day.
      > I really enjoy reading the discussions even though much of it is
      > over my head. I have learned a lot about wind, batteries, lightning and
      > other issues I would not otherwise have thought about.
      >
      > Thanks for your time;
      > Elizabeth
      > Western Maine, USA
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Jacques Chaurette Australia
      Hi Elizabeth, not too many pumps will allow you to pull water up from 16 feet, 15 feet is the max for a typical residential jet flow pump. So I think you will
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 30, 2006
        Hi Elizabeth, not too many pumps will allow you to pull water up from 16 feet, 15 feet is the max for a typical residential jet flow pump. So I think you will be safer with a submersible pump.

        Cheers,

        Jacques
        www.fluidedesign.com

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: LadyBug
        To: awea-wind-home@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 12:29 PM
        Subject: [a-w-h] water pump - submersible or indoor?


        Hello:
        I am going to be installing a 1Kw Bergey next year which will also
        have some PV panels on the tower as part of the system.
        Now, I am digging my well (a dug well 12 to 16 feet depending on
        ledge encountered, not an artesian well) and had planned on using an indoor
        electric water pump. A friend mentioned that it is easier to push water
        than to pull it and advised me to use a submersible pump. Any comments from
        the group on the efficiency of one vs the other would be appreciated.
        Also, there was an article in a recent issue of Home Power about
        using AC vs. DC appliances. What would you recommend if I used a
        submersible pump? The water line from the well to the foundation is about
        120 feet, there are only two of us using minimal water per day.
        I really enjoy reading the discussions even though much of it is
        over my head. I have learned a lot about wind, batteries, lightning and
        other issues I would not otherwise have thought about.

        Thanks for your time;
        Elizabeth
        Western Maine, USA





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Matt Tritt
        Jacques, Not true. All jet pumps are designed to pull from approximately 25 feet with a single pipe, and up to about 160 with a double pipe; this is true
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 2, 2006
          Jacques,

          Not true. All "jet pumps" are designed to pull from approximately 25
          feet with a single pipe, and up to about 160" with a double pipe; this
          is true for virtually all makes and horsepower ratings. For
          verification, go to www.goulds.com/pdf/BJ+.pdf

          Matt

          Jacques Chaurette Australia wrote:

          > Hi Elizabeth, not too many pumps will allow you to pull water up from
          > 16 feet, 15 feet is the max for a typical residential jet flow pump.
          > So I think you will be safer with a submersible pump.
          >
          > Cheers,
          >
          > Jacques
          > www.fluidedesign.com
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: LadyBug
          > To: awea-wind-home@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:awea-wind-home%40yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 12:29 PM
          > Subject: [a-w-h] water pump - submersible or indoor?
          >
          > Hello:
          > I am going to be installing a 1Kw Bergey next year which will also
          > have some PV panels on the tower as part of the system.
          > Now, I am digging my well (a dug well 12 to 16 feet depending on
          > ledge encountered, not an artesian well) and had planned on using an
          > indoor
          > electric water pump. A friend mentioned that it is easier to push water
          > than to pull it and advised me to use a submersible pump. Any comments
          > from
          > the group on the efficiency of one vs the other would be appreciated.
          > Also, there was an article in a recent issue of Home Power about
          > using AC vs. DC appliances. What would you recommend if I used a
          > submersible pump? The water line from the well to the foundation is about
          > 120 feet, there are only two of us using minimal water per day.
          > I really enjoy reading the discussions even though much of it is
          > over my head. I have learned a lot about wind, batteries, lightning and
          > other issues I would not otherwise have thought about.
          >
          > Thanks for your time;
          > Elizabeth
          > Western Maine, USA
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
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