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Re: Section Joints and British Shows

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  • maureenrw <MaureenRW@excite.com>
    ... Thanks for the suggestions Steve. We ve been pondering the specifics of our layout, and it looks like we ll have to go with removable bits for several
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 2, 2003
      --- In small-layout-design@yahoogroups.com, "steve_waterfielduk <
      stephen.waterfield@v...>" <stephen.waterfield@v...> wrote:
      > The removable bit of track 'N' trak style
      > looks terrible where the joints are part of a continuous scene,

      > keep tracks as close to a right angle to the join as possible.

      Thanks for the suggestions Steve. We've been pondering the specifics
      of our layout, and it looks like we'll have to go with removable bits
      for several reasons. The combination of our track plan (with as little
      track parallel to the edges as possible) and the geometry of where the
      joints of the section have to go to fit our space, precludes having
      most of the bridging tracks anywhere near parallel. Also, our sections
      aren't being built all at once. We're starting one small stand-alone
      section now. We want to get a lot of work on that done before starting
      the next and largest stand-alone section. The removable section will
      link these two, and so will be built at the same time as the larger
      section or later.

      I think what we'll do for the removable bits is to have a whole slice
      of the roadbed and maybe some surrounding scenary slide out (a tiny
      jigsaw piece). This should look better than a basic NTrak connector.
      And it will also allow us to slide in a bumper track so we can safely
      use that stretch of track on the small layout for interchange staging
      while it is not connected to the larger one.

      Thinking of tiny jigsaw pieces... we're not planning on having
      buildings or large chunks of scenary be interchangeable, but we are
      planning on having as many tiny jigsaw bits with people action scenes
      as we can. This way, daily life on the layout won't be static and we
      can occaisionally change the activities. The sections of station
      platforms can easily be swapped to provide different crowds of waiting
      people. The young hobbits at the Mill Pond sometimes can be throwing
      rocks at the ducks, and sometimes they'll be getting chased by the
      goose. Periodically the dwarven miners will go on strike up in the
      Iron Hills. And so on. This should provide lots of modelling
      opportunities whenever we want to make a new little scene, and should
      keep our visitors entertained looking to see what little details and
      stories have changed.

      --Mo
    • steve_waterfielduk <stephen.waterfield@v
      ... wrote: ... modular ... layout ... For group members who don t know this one, Tidmeric is a mineral tramway (sometimes with pretensions to greater
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 3, 2003
        --- In small-layout-design@yahoogroups.com, "Len" <lkaplan@d...>
        wrote:
        "
        >
        > How long and deep is the layout? I'm trying to convince my On30
        modular
        > buddies that we might want to consider building an "exhibition
        layout"
        >

        For group members who don't know this one, 'Tidmeric' is a mineral
        tramway (sometimes with pretensions to greater things) used for for
        transporting stone to and from a crushing plant. Scale is 1:48, gauge
        is 14mm (2ft scale) and stock tends to be kit from Wrightlines, Roy C
        Link and more recently from Black Dog etc.. I never regarded it
        as 'small' as it is 15ft long by 2ft6" wide, but a scale length train
        of Ruston diesel plus 8 side tip skips is only about 15". There are
        three baseboards, but the layout can also be assembled to operate
        using only the two outer boards (10ft) whilst maintaing track
        alignments and scenic contours. Basic baseboard construction is
        plywood with the flat track base and sides cut away for the scenic
        depressions. The side skirt of each board is therefore quite deep to
        allow for this and also allows the legs which are integral to be
        folded up out of the way for transport.

        If anyone is interested, I can post a diagram and a write up with one
        or two pics. Anything specific I will be pleased to answer on/off
        list.
        Now in the realms of 'small' the Tidmeric project also resulted
        in 'Petroc Quarries', my own personal layout that started life in a
        hotel in Japan as a test track for Tidmeric rolling stock, but it
        just grew and is now about 2ft x 1'8". Continuous loop, passing
        track, spur siding and train sector plate plus quarry buildings. This
        one I think does qualify in this group, pictures to follow.


        Steve W
      • Bill Uffelman
        Any additional information would be most welcome. Bill Uffelman ... From: To: Sent:
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 3, 2003
          Any additional information would be most welcome.

          Bill Uffelman
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: <stephen.waterfield@...>
          To: <small-layout-design@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, March 03, 2003 9:01 AM
          Subject: [small-layout-design] Tidmeric Minerals -was Section Joints and
          British Shows


          > --- In small-layout-design@yahoogroups.com, "Len" <lkaplan@d...>
          > wrote:
          > "
          > >
          > > How long and deep is the layout? I'm trying to convince my On30
          > modular
          > > buddies that we might want to consider building an "exhibition
          > layout"
          > >
          >
          > For group members who don't know this one, 'Tidmeric' is a mineral
          > tramway (sometimes with pretensions to greater things) used for for
          > transporting stone to and from a crushing plant. Scale is 1:48, gauge
          > is 14mm (2ft scale) and stock tends to be kit from Wrightlines, Roy C
          > Link and more recently from Black Dog etc.. I never regarded it
          > as 'small' as it is 15ft long by 2ft6" wide, but a scale length train
          > of Ruston diesel plus 8 side tip skips is only about 15". There are
          > three baseboards, but the layout can also be assembled to operate
          > using only the two outer boards (10ft) whilst maintaing track
          > alignments and scenic contours. Basic baseboard construction is
          > plywood with the flat track base and sides cut away for the scenic
          > depressions. The side skirt of each board is therefore quite deep to
          > allow for this and also allows the legs which are integral to be
          > folded up out of the way for transport.
          >
          > If anyone is interested, I can post a diagram and a write up with one
          > or two pics. Anything specific I will be pleased to answer on/off
          > list.
          > Now in the realms of 'small' the Tidmeric project also resulted
          > in 'Petroc Quarries', my own personal layout that started life in a
          > hotel in Japan as a test track for Tidmeric rolling stock, but it
          > just grew and is now about 2ft x 1'8". Continuous loop, passing
          > track, spur siding and train sector plate plus quarry buildings. This
          > one I think does qualify in this group, pictures to follow.
          >
          >
          > Steve W
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