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I wish to try braising.

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  • malcolm572001
    How is braising different from slow cooking? Is a Dutch oven the same as a stock pot?
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 21, 2013
      How is braising different from slow cooking? Is a Dutch oven the same as a stock pot?
    • Charlotte
      No. The Dutch oven is the big pot with the small handles on both sides of the pot. I believe it s called that because because it can go in the oven & you can
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 26, 2013
        No. The Dutch oven is the big pot with the small handles on both sides of the pot. I believe it's called that because because it can go in the oven & you can cook things that way - like cooking in a casserole dish. Whereas a saucepan (many times) can't go in the oven - the long plastic handle may melt in the oven.

        Charlotte
        from my iPhone

        On Jun 21, 2013, at 7:38 PM, <leatherneck@...> wrote:

        > Is a Dutch oven the same as a stock pot?
      • Charlotte
        Slowcooking is just that - slowcooking. (according to Wikipedia) Braising is (from the French “braiser”) is a combination cooking method using both moist
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 26, 2013
          Slowcooking is just that - slowcooking.
          (according to Wikipedia) Braising is (from the French “braiser”) is a combination cooking method using both moist and dry heat; typically the food is first seared at a high temperature and then finished in a covered pot with a variable amount of liquid, resulting in a particular flavor.
          <http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Braising>


          Charlotte
          from my iPhone

          On Jun 21, 2013, at 7:38 PM, <leatherneck@...> wrote:

          > How is braising different from slow cooking?


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ernie Shumaker
          ... ~~~~~~~~~~ No. A stock pot is normally taller that it is wide, made of normal thickness metal. It is designed to reduce surface area of the liquid inside
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 8, 2013
            On Jun 21, 2013, at 7:38 PM, <leatherneck@...> wrote:
            > Is a Dutch oven the same as a stock pot?
            ~~~~~~~~~~

            No.

            A stock pot is normally taller that it is wide, made of "normal"
            thickness metal. It is designed to reduce surface area of the liquid
            inside to minimize evaporation. It is intended to extract flavors from
            meats, veggies, carcases, etc., and infuse those into the liquid
            surrounding them (a broth or "stock", hence the term "stock pot"). They
            may or may not include lids. And they may or may not have handles on
            either side to help in wrestling around a full pot of broth or stock.

            Since extracting the gelatin from bones and carcases to make a "stock"
            takes a fairly long time at a simmer, you don't want to boil off the
            liquid stock you're trying to create during the long simmering process.
            The tall, thin design helps in that regard. This is the opposite from a
            "sauce pan" which is normally wider than tall, to maximize surface area
            which aids when you're boiling down or "reducing" a sauce to concentrate
            the flavors.

            A "Dutch Oven" is normally wider than it is tall, and made of heavy
            gauge metal, frequently cast iron (though there are other types as
            well). They nearly always have a lid available. And they may or may not
            include small handles on either side to help move them around. They are
            designed to create even heating of the contents even when the heat
            sources outside the pot are not evenly surrounding the pot (on stove top
            or campfire, for instance, or in an oven with stronger heat from top and
            bottom than from the sides). The thick metal minimizes "hot spots" and
            also causes the pot to react slowly to abrupt changes in external
            temperature.

            Dutch Ovens occasionally come with small "peg legs" and dish-like lids
            to permit them to be used in campfires. With coals below, and more piled
            on top of the lids, they can be used to bake biscuits and bread, corn
            bread, etc., as well as cooking stews and beans and other long-cook
            items you don't want to scorch on the bottom, when out on the open
            range. Some also include a wire "bail" attached from side to side, to
            allow them to hang from a hook above a fire, or to make it easier to
            lift one out of the coals.

            They are excellent for cooking similar items on the stove top, or for
            searing on stove top over high heat (the heavy metal can be heated to
            quite a high temperature and provides a good "sear" to meats without
            localized hot spots to burn areas), then baking for longer duration in
            the oven. (This is the definition of Braising, if you add liquid prior
            to putting the pot into the oven.)

            Hope this was helpful!

            ERNIE



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