Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Slow Cooker Perigord Fig and Onion Jam - 4 pts plus; 25g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber

Expand Messages
  • Chupa Babi
    This has become my go-to spread. I dip crudite in it, I use it as a sandwich spread, I mix it with my steel-cut oatmeal. It is fabulous.
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 5, 2013
      This has become my go-to spread. I dip crudite in it, I use it as a sandwich spread, I mix it with my steel-cut oatmeal. It is fabulous.
                           
      * Exported from MasterCook *
                        Slow Cooker Perigord Fig and Onion Jam
      Recipe By     :
      Serving Size  : 24    Preparation Time :0:00
      Categories    : Condiment                       LowCal (Less than 300 cals)
                      LowerCarbs                      LowFat (Less than 30%)
                      Vegan
        Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
      --------  ------------  --------------------------------
           1/2           cup  unsalted butter
        6              large  sweet onions -- such as Vidalia, coarsely chopped
        1                cup  firmly packed brown sugar
        1 1/2           cups  balsamic vinegar
        24                    dried figs -- coarsely chopped
       
       
      Divide the butter between two large skillets and melt it over medium-high
      heat. Add half the onions to each skillet and saute for 3 to 4 minutes to
      soften them. (Or saute the onions in one pan in batches.) Transfer the
      onions to the insert of a 4 to 6-quart slow cooker; stir in the brown
      sugar, vinegar, and figs, and toss to coat. Cover the slow cooker and cook
      on High for 4 hours, or on low for 8 hours. The onions and figs should be
      softened, and the sauce should be thickened.
      Cool the mixture to room temperature; the sauce will thicken as it cools.
      Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 months.
       
      Makes about 6 cups; 24 one-quarter cup servings
       
      AuthorNote: I can't count the number of times I have shared this recipe
      with friends; it is the quintessential melding of sweet, tart, and savory.
      Although it is customarily made with prunes in the Dordogne area of
      France, I find that Americans prefer to use dried figs or a combination of
      figs and prunes. This jam is traditionally served with seared fois gras,
      but I love to use it with creamy goat cheese or other cheeses on toasted
      slices of baguette. The jam is also delicious to add to the slow cooker
      when cooking [pFavorite]. The savory juices are great served over buttered
      noodles.
       
      Cuisine:
        "French"
      Source:
        "Mediterranean Slow Cooker Cookbook by Diane Phillips, 2012"
      S(Formatted by Chupa Babi):
        "Feb 2013"
      Yield:
        "6 cups"
                                          - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 130 Calories; 4g Fat (26.5%
      calories from fat); 1g Protein; 25g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 10mg
      Cholesterol; 7mg Sodium.  Exchanges: 1/2 Vegetable; 1 Fruit; 1 Fat; 1/2
      Other Carbohydrates.

      Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Auntie J
      Totally understandable how this savory jam could be a go-to spread for elegant dining, casual meals or as an appetizer. It definitely is fabulous. Figs were
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 7, 2013
        Totally understandable how this savory jam could be a go-to spread for
        elegant dining, casual meals or as an appetizer. It definitely is
        fabulous.

        Figs were on sale this week so I made a half-batch to see what we
        thought. Two thumbs from both of us. I slathered some over salmon for
        dinner tonight. Amazing.

        Needless to say, figs and onions are back on the shopping list.

        Thank you for sharing this recipe!

        On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 4:03 PM, Chupa Babi <recetta@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > This has become my go-to spread. I dip crudite in it, I use it as a
        > sandwich spread, I mix it with my steel-cut oatmeal. It is fabulous.
        >
        > * Exported from MasterCook *
        > Slow Cooker Perigord Fig and Onion Jam
        > Recipe By :
        > Serving Size : 24 Preparation Time :0:00
        > Categories : Condiment LowCal (Less than 300 cals)
        > LowerCarbs LowFat (Less than 30%)
        > Vegan
        > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
        > -------- ------------ --------------------------------
        > 1/2 cup unsalted butter
        > 6 large sweet onions -- such as Vidalia, coarsely chopped
        > 1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
        > 1 1/2 cups balsamic vinegar
        > 24 dried figs -- coarsely chopped
        >
        >
        > Divide the butter between two large skillets and melt it over medium-high
        > heat. Add half the onions to each skillet and saute for 3 to 4 minutes to
        > soften them. (Or saute the onions in one pan in batches.) Transfer the
        > onions to the insert of a 4 to 6-quart slow cooker; stir in the brown
        > sugar, vinegar, and figs, and toss to coat. Cover the slow cooker and cook
        > on High for 4 hours, or on low for 8 hours. The onions and figs should be
        > softened, and the sauce should be thickened.
        > Cool the mixture to room temperature; the sauce will thicken as it cools.
        > Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 months.
        >
        > Makes about 6 cups; 24 one-quarter cup servings
        >
        > AuthorNote: I can't count the number of times I have shared this recipe
        > with friends; it is the quintessential melding of sweet, tart, and savory.
        > Although it is customarily made with prunes in the Dordogne area of
        > France, I find that Americans prefer to use dried figs or a combination of
        > figs and prunes. This jam is traditionally served with seared fois gras,
        > but I love to use it with creamy goat cheese or other cheeses on toasted
        > slices of baguette. The jam is also delicious to add to the slow cooker
        > when cooking [pFavorite]. The savory juices are great served over buttered
        > noodles.
        >
        > Cuisine:
        > "French"
        > Source:
        > "Mediterranean Slow Cooker Cookbook by Diane Phillips, 2012"
        > S(Formatted by Chupa Babi):
        > "Feb 2013"
        > Yield:
        > "6 cups"
        > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        > Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 130 Calories; 4g Fat (26.5%
        > calories from fat); 1g Protein; 25g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 10mg
        > Cholesterol; 7mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Vegetable; 1 Fruit; 1 Fat; 1/2
        > Other Carbohydrates.
        >
        > Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • recetta
        I m so glad you liked it, Auntie J. For a relative modest expenditure (the price fo figs)it makes a very luxurious condiment. I m going to try replacing the
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 12, 2013
          I'm so glad you liked it, Auntie J. For a relative modest expenditure (the price fo figs)it makes a very luxurious condiment. I'm going to try replacing the figs with prunes and see how that comes out.
          Chupa

          --- In slowcooker@yahoogroups.com, Auntie J <auntiej500@...> wrote:
          >
          > Totally understandable how this savory jam could be a go-to spread for
          > elegant dining, casual meals or as an appetizer. It definitely is
          > fabulous.
          >
          > Figs were on sale this week so I made a half-batch to see what we
          > thought. Two thumbs from both of us. I slathered some over salmon for
          > dinner tonight. Amazing.
          >
          > Needless to say, figs and onions are back on the shopping list.
          >
          > Thank you for sharing this recipe!
          >
          > On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 4:03 PM, Chupa Babi <recetta@...> wrote:
          >
          > > **
          > >
          > >
          > > This has become my go-to spread. I dip crudite in it, I use it as a
          > > sandwich spread, I mix it with my steel-cut oatmeal. It is fabulous.
          > >
          > > * Exported from MasterCook *
          > > Slow Cooker Perigord Fig and Onion Jam
          > > Recipe By :
          > > Serving Size : 24 Preparation Time :0:00
          > > Categories : Condiment LowCal (Less than 300 cals)
          > > LowerCarbs LowFat (Less than 30%)
          > > Vegan
          > > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
          > > -------- ------------ --------------------------------
          > > 1/2 cup unsalted butter
          > > 6 large sweet onions -- such as Vidalia, coarsely chopped
          > > 1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
          > > 1 1/2 cups balsamic vinegar
          > > 24 dried figs -- coarsely chopped
          > >
          > >
          > > Divide the butter between two large skillets and melt it over medium-high
          > > heat. Add half the onions to each skillet and saute for 3 to 4 minutes to
          > > soften them. (Or saute the onions in one pan in batches.) Transfer the
          > > onions to the insert of a 4 to 6-quart slow cooker; stir in the brown
          > > sugar, vinegar, and figs, and toss to coat. Cover the slow cooker and cook
          > > on High for 4 hours, or on low for 8 hours. The onions and figs should be
          > > softened, and the sauce should be thickened.
          > > Cool the mixture to room temperature; the sauce will thicken as it cools.
          > > Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 months.
          > >
          > > Makes about 6 cups; 24 one-quarter cup servings
          > >
          > > AuthorNote: I can't count the number of times I have shared this recipe
          > > with friends; it is the quintessential melding of sweet, tart, and savory.
          > > Although it is customarily made with prunes in the Dordogne area of
          > > France, I find that Americans prefer to use dried figs or a combination of
          > > figs and prunes. This jam is traditionally served with seared fois gras,
          > > but I love to use it with creamy goat cheese or other cheeses on toasted
          > > slices of baguette. The jam is also delicious to add to the slow cooker
          > > when cooking [pFavorite]. The savory juices are great served over buttered
          > > noodles.
          > >
          > > Cuisine:
          > > "French"
          > > Source:
          > > "Mediterranean Slow Cooker Cookbook by Diane Phillips, 2012"
          > > S(Formatted by Chupa Babi):
          > > "Feb 2013"
          > > Yield:
          > > "6 cups"
          > > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
          > > Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 130 Calories; 4g Fat (26.5%
          > > calories from fat); 1g Protein; 25g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 10mg
          > > Cholesterol; 7mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Vegetable; 1 Fruit; 1 Fat; 1/2
          > > Other Carbohydrates.
          > >
          > > Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Dawn
          How would fresh figs work? I have a fig tree and am looking forward to a good harvest this summer. Dawn in SW GA [Non-text portions of this message have been
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 13, 2013
            How would fresh figs work? I have a fig tree and am looking forward to a good harvest this summer.
            Dawn in SW GA

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Auntie J
            Dawn Fresh fruit has more moisture than dried and drying changes the flavor. You might want to try the recipe as written and then adjust the liquids in the
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 14, 2013
              Dawn

              Fresh fruit has more moisture than dried and drying changes the flavor.
              You might want to try the recipe as written and then adjust the liquids in
              the next batch to accommodate the fresh fruit.

              You can always dry the figs yourself and proceed with the recipe that
              way.



              On Wed, Mar 13, 2013 at 8:06 AM, Dawn <dawngrcha@...> wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              > How would fresh figs work? I have a fig tree and am looking forward to a
              > good harvest this summer.
              > Dawn in SW GA
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.