Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

West Bends - slowcooker versus crockpot

Expand Messages
  • mrublee
    Just a small note of caution on the West Bends. They do not have heating elements around the sides, and consequently some people worry about using them to
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 3, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Just a small note of caution on the West Bends. They do not have heating elements around the sides, and consequently some people worry about using them to cook large pieces of meat. Here is what we wrote in the FAQ about it:

      Some slowcookers only have heating elements on the bottom. Since there are safety concerns with such low level heat coming only from the bottom bringing a large piece of meat up to a high enough temperature before spoiling, the USDA recommends that these be used for soups and stews only, where the food is cut into smaller pieces. Experience on the list is mixed, with some reporting no problems but others having experiences such as one woman who came home to a roast burnt on the outside but still raw on the inside. The OTHER type of slowcooker has heating elements on the sides as well as the bottom, and is usually called a crockpot or crockery cooker. Heat surrounds the food, bringing the entire piece of meat more quickly up to a safe temperature. This is the sort of appliance most discussion on the list is targeted toward.

      ---------------------

      Now, I'm not saying don't buy a West Bend. Some of our long-time members use them and love them. But I just wanted to put this out there.
    • Greg Rothschild
      That s very helpful and something I did not take into consideration- thanks again! Greg http://www.gregrothschild.com
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 3, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        That's very helpful and something I did not take into consideration-
        thanks again!

        Greg


        http://www.gregrothschild.com


        On 12/3/2010 9:24 PM, mrublee wrote:
        > Just a small note of caution on the West Bends. They do not have heating elements around the sides, and consequently some people worry about using them to cook large pieces of meat. Here is what we wrote in the FAQ about it:
        >
        > Some slowcookers only have heating elements on the bottom. Since there are safety concerns with such low level heat coming only from the bottom bringing a large piece of meat up to a high enough temperature before spoiling, the USDA recommends that these be used for soups and stews only, where the food is cut into smaller pieces. Experience on the list is mixed, with some reporting no problems but others having experiences such as one woman who came home to a roast burnt on the outside but still raw on the inside. The OTHER type of slowcooker has heating elements on the sides as well as the bottom, and is usually called a crockpot or crockery cooker. Heat surrounds the food, bringing the entire piece of meat more quickly up to a safe temperature. This is the sort of appliance most discussion on the list is targeted toward.
        >
        > ---------------------
        >
        > Now, I'm not saying don't buy a West Bend. Some of our long-time members use them and love them. But I just wanted to put this out there.
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > To subscribe, send a message to slowcooker-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > To unsubscribe, send a message to slowcooker-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > To view the archives, go to http://groups.yahoo.com/messages/slowcooker
        > To view our recipe of the month contest winners, go to http://malincholia.com/slowcookerwinners.htm
        > To contact the list owner, send a message to slowcooker-owner@yahoogroups.com
        > =====
        > Copyright, 2010, Maria Rost Rublee.
        > ===== Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Suzanne Silk Klein
        I have 2 very old West Bends that I love as well as one of the newer hotter cooking crockpots. Personally, I have bener had a problem with the slow heating
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 4, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          I have 2 very old West Bends that I love as well as one of the newer
          hotter cooking crockpots. Personally, I have bener had a problem with
          the slow heating West Bends, but I've never tried to pot roast in them.
          I have cooked whole chickens, however, with no ill effects.

          Suzanne

          On 04/12/2010 12:24 AM, mrublee wrote:
          > Just a small note of caution on the West Bends. They do not have heating elements around the sides, and consequently some people worry about using them to cook large pieces of meat. Here is what we wrote in the FAQ about it:
          >
          > Some slowcookers only have heating elements on the bottom. Since there are safety concerns with such low level heat coming only from the bottom bringing a large piece of meat up to a high enough temperature before spoiling, the USDA recommends that these be used for soups and stews only, where the food is cut into smaller pieces. Experience on the list is mixed, with some reporting no problems but others having experiences such as one woman who came home to a roast burnt on the outside but still raw on the inside. The OTHER type of slowcooker has heating elements on the sides as well as the bottom, and is usually called a crockpot or crockery cooker. Heat surrounds the food, bringing the entire piece of meat more quickly up to a safe temperature. This is the sort of appliance most discussion on the list is targeted toward.
          >
          > ---------------------
          >
          > Now, I'm not saying don't buy a West Bend. Some of our long-time members use them and love them. But I just wanted to put this out there.
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > To subscribe, send a message to slowcooker-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > To unsubscribe, send a message to slowcooker-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > To view the archives, go to http://groups.yahoo.com/messages/slowcooker
          > To view our recipe of the month contest winners, go to http://malincholia.com/slowcookerwinners.htm
          > To contact the list owner, send a message to slowcooker-owner@yahoogroups.com
          > =====
          > Copyright, 2010, Maria Rost Rublee.
          > ===== Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • nicciip
          I have a westbend 6 Q and it takes forever to heat up...usually use for stews,soups & chili...I also have 2 3 1/2 Q cuisinarts and they do have the side
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 4, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            I have a westbend 6 Q and it takes forever to heat up...usually use for stews,soups & chili...I also have 2 3 1/2 Q cuisinarts and they do have the side elements..they are wonderful...we have some issues with allergys and such in our house so often i cook two diffrent meals and/or 4 chicken breast fit perfect in them!They have a timers were on sale recently at boston store...love them!
            Niccii

            --- In slowcooker@yahoogroups.com, "mrublee" <mrublee@...> wrote:
            >
            > Just a small note of caution on the West Bends. They do not have heating elements around the sides, and consequently some people worry about using them to cook large pieces of meat. Here is what we wrote in the FAQ about it:
            >
            > Some slowcookers only have heating elements on the bottom. Since there are safety concerns with such low level heat coming only from the bottom bringing a large piece of meat up to a high enough temperature before spoiling, the USDA recommends that these be used for soups and stews only, where the food is cut into smaller pieces. Experience on the list is mixed, with some reporting no problems but others having experiences such as one woman who came home to a roast burnt on the outside but still raw on the inside. The OTHER type of slowcooker has heating elements on the sides as well as the bottom, and is usually called a crockpot or crockery cooker. Heat surrounds the food, bringing the entire piece of meat more quickly up to a safe temperature. This is the sort of appliance most discussion on the list is targeted toward.
            >
            > ---------------------
            >
            > Now, I'm not saying don't buy a West Bend. Some of our long-time members use them and love them. But I just wanted to put this out there.
            >
          • Ilene Fabisch
            I have an oval Magic Chef that I bought on sale quite a few years back. I m using it for the first time today to make a Beef Brisket..9hrs on low. Seems like
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 5, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              I have an oval Magic Chef that I bought on sale quite a few years
              back. I'm
              using it for the first time today to make a Beef Brisket..9hrs on low.
              Seems like the heat goes all the way around but I have no idea. First
              time not
              using my trusty 30yr old crock pot so I have my fingers crossed.
              Just chose
              this one because the 4lb brisket sits better on the bottom of this one.

              Ilene
            • WAC
              I ve used them for pork and beef roasts, hams, whole chickens and Cornish hens, turkey breasts, etc.  The high setting will bring it up to boiling within the
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 5, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                I've used them for pork and beef roasts, hams, whole chickens and Cornish hens,
                turkey breasts, etc.  The high setting will bring it up to boiling within the
                first hour or quicker (I've never timed it) so there is no concern about food
                safety.  I start most things on high and then quickly adjust the dial to where I
                want to finish the cooking.  I used to use an electronic temperature probe to
                check but never had the center of anything stay in the danger zone (40-140
                degrees) long enough to pose a problem.



                ________________________________

                From: Suzanne Silk Klein shoshana32@...

                I have 2 very old West Bends that I love as well as one of the newer
                hotter cooking crockpots.  Personally, I have bener had a problem with
                the slow heating West Bends, but I've never tried to pot roast in them. 
                I have cooked whole chickens, however, with no ill effects.

                On 04/12/2010 12:24 AM, mrublee wrote:
                > Just a small note of caution on the West Bends.  They do not have heating
                >elements around the sides, and consequently some people worry about using them
                >to cook large pieces of meat. 
                >




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Rick and Jan Lloyd
                I am on my second West Bend (my first one was a West Bend for Sears!). I have been using the West Bend bottom cooker (I also have two regular crockpots)
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 5, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  I am on my second West Bend (my first one was a West Bend for Sears!). I
                  have been using the West Bend "bottom cooker" (I also have two "regular"
                  crockpots) for about 30 years and make roasts, whole chickens, ribs, stew,
                  soup, chili, and you name it and I have probably made something similar and
                  we have NEVER had a problem. If I have time in the morning, I might start
                  it on 5 (high) for an hour, if I don't have time, I use 2.5 - 3. I think
                  that since the bottom gets hot, the heat goes through everything.

                  I LOVE this unit. I would not let this turn me away for it.. After all,
                  "experts" are telling us that slow cookers are healthy because they cook too
                  low and now they all cook too hot.

                  Jan in SoCal



                  _____

                  From: slowcooker@yahoogroups.com [mailto:slowcooker@yahoogroups.com] On
                  Behalf Of Greg Rothschild
                  That's very helpful and something I did not take into consideration-
                  thanks again!

                  Greg

                  On 12/3/2010 9:24 PM, mrublee wrote:
                  > Just a small note of caution on the West Bends. They do not have heating
                  elements around the sides, and consequently some people worry about using
                  them to cook large pieces of meat. Here is what we wrote in the FAQ about
                  it:
                  >
                  > Some slowcookers only have heating elements on the bottom. Since there are
                  safety concerns with such low level heat coming only from the bottom
                  bringing a large piece of meat up to a high enough temperature before
                  spoiling, the USDA recommends that these be used for soups and stews only,
                  where the food is cut into smaller pieces. Experience on the list is mixed,
                  with some reporting no problems but others having experiences such as one
                  woman who came home to a roast burnt on the outside but still raw on the
                  inside. The OTHER type of slowcooker has heating elements on the sides as
                  well as the bottom, and is usually called a crockpot or crockery cooker.
                  Heat surrounds the food, bringing the entire piece of meat more quickly up
                  to a safe temperature. This is the sort of appliance most discussion on the
                  list is targeted toward.





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.