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Re: [slowcooker] Help! Dry Pork

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  • Jan Bailey
    I find you need a cheap cut of meat, usually with some fat to cook in the crock pot. Then it won t dry out. I find that putting some onions over the top of
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 2, 2008
      I find you need a cheap cut of meat, usually with some fat to cook in the crock pot. Then it won't dry out. I find that putting some onions over the top of the roast helps too, and I often put some cream of mushroom soup over the top of my roast along with some dryonion soup mix.

      Jan

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Allison Ingle
      To: slowcooker@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2008 9:11 AM
      Subject: Re: [slowcooker] Help! Dry Pork


      I have the same problem.... I am wanting to cook a pork roast, but I am not sure what liquid if any needs to go in with it. I want to add potatoes, carrots, and onions to the mix, but I don't want a dry roast and veggies....I wasn't sure about buillon or soup mixes.... please pass some advice on to us!

      Allison

      Jennice <johatcher@...> wrote:
      I'm new to the group, and sure could use some help with cooking pork
      chops and pork roasts in the slow cooker. I envy the people who send
      in recipes for "fall-off-the-bone" pork chops. Mine always turn out
      dry. Am I just cooking them too long (I use the time specified on
      recipes)? Does anyone else out there have the same problem?

      Thanks in advance for any advice!

      Jennice

      ---------------------------------
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    • WAC
      Except for stir-fry, I almost always use the slow cooker to cook pork. The one I use the most is a West Bend with 5 temp settings and I will frequently use
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 2, 2008
        Except for stir-fry, I almost always use the slow cooker to cook pork. The one I use the most is a West Bend with 5 temp settings and I will frequently use the higher settings when I want to hurry things along.

        I routinely choose leaner cuts because of health concerns. I also trim any visable fat. I am frequently asked how I get my meats to turn out so tender and moist.

        I always make sure I cook with some liquid although some recipes require more than others. If you don't wish to cook your pork in liquid, set your meat on a rack. If you don't have a rack for your slow cooker, ball up several pieces of aluminum foil to place in the bottom of the slow cooker and place the meat on them. Measure the inside bottom of your slow cooker and whenever you're in a housewares department, check out the racks and trivets they have; you'll probably be able to find one that will fit.

        After several hours of cooking, I check to see how it's doing by taking a cooking fork and seeing if it will easily shred; if it won't, I let it go for another hour or two and check again. I have several slow cookers and each one cooks a little different that the others. You really have to experiment with yours to see what works best for each type and cut of meat. Recipe times and temps are basically a reference point for you to start with. Do it that way the first time and then adjust as needed. Make notes on your recipe regarding what worked and what didn't so you'll know what to do the next time.




        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Jennice <johatcher@...>

        I'm new to the group, and sure could use some help with cooking pork
        chops and pork roasts in the slow cooker. I envy the people who send
        in recipes for "fall-off-the-bone" pork chops. Mine always turn out
        dry. Am I just cooking them too long (I use the time specified on
        recipes)? Does anyone else out there have the same problem?


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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • deboraha@aol.com
        I find it turns out really yummy when I chunk up some apples and set the pork on them. Then I use a little apple juice and cinnamon to add to the flavor.
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 2, 2008
          I find it turns out really yummy when I chunk up some apples and set the
          pork on them. Then I use a little apple juice and cinnamon to add to the
          flavor. Sometimes cranberry sauce as well. One of my family's favs. Enjoy! Debbie


          In a message dated 1/2/2008 7:47:10 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
          jb021951@... writes:




          I find you need a cheap cut of meat, usually with some fat to cook in the
          crock pot. Then it won't dry out. I find that putting some onions over the top
          of the roast helps too, and I often put some cream of mushroom soup over the
          top of my roast along with some dryonion soup mix.

          Jan

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Allison Ingle
          To: _slowcooker@yahoogroslowcoo_ (mailto:slowcooker@yahoogroups.com)
          Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2008 9:11 AM
          Subject: Re: [slowcooker] Help! Dry Pork

          I have the same problem.... I am wanting to cook a pork roast, but I am not
          sure what liquid if any needs to go in with it. I want to add potatoes,
          carrots, and onions to the mix, but I don't want a dry roast and veggies....I
          wasn't sure about buillon or soup mixes.... please pass some advice on to us!

          Allison

          Jennice <_johatcher@earthlinkjoha_ (mailto:johatcher@...) > wrote:
          I'm new to the group, and sure could use some help with cooking pork
          chops and pork roasts in the slow cooker. I envy the people who send
          in recipes for "fall-off-the-in recipes for "fall-off-the-<WBR>bone" por
          dry. Am I just cooking them too long (I use the time specified on
          recipes)? Does anyone else out there have the same problem?

          Thanks in advance for any advice!

          Jennice

          ---------------------------------
          Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it
          now.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Alejandro
          Moderator s note: thanks for cleaning up the typo (there were actually several spaces) - here is the correct link:
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 2, 2008
            Moderator's note: thanks for cleaning up the typo (there were actually several spaces) - here is the correct link:

            http://www.cooksillustrated.com/images/document/howto/ND01_ISBriningbasics.pdf

            and here is a tinyurl version to avoid wraparound issues creating new unwanted spaces

            http://tinyurl.com/2s6dy2

            but yes, that is a site you need to register to access, while the link is also to a .pdf file, which can cause other people problems.

            Also, I snipped a bunch of unnecessary encoding at the end and spacing in the quoted text - again, a reminder to everyone to please include quoted text to make things understandable, but make it as small as possible as a courtesy to fellow listmembers


            There is a typo in your link (a space in "illustrated"). I fixed that, went to the site, but it says the URL is wrong and no such article can be found. I searched that site for "brining" and it returned hundreds of articles. I clicked on one that sounds like it might be the one you are referring to--and was prompted to register with the site before I can read the article. Lots of obstacles, no payoff. A shame--I would have liked to read the article....

            ----- Original Message ----
            From: KathleenSews <Kathleen.Sews@...>
            To: slowcooker@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, January 2, 2008 6:15:07 PM
            Subject: Re: [slowcooker] Re: Help! Dry Pork



            > Some may disagree, but I agree with you completely! Slowcooking is

            > designed for "fattier" meats. In fact, I find that eye of round beef
            > roasts and pork loins can become very dry even when cooked for shorter

            Very lean pork and poultry and some seafood benefit from
            brining before cooking. This link is a primer on brining in .pdf
            format.

            www.cooksillustrate d.com/images/ document/ howto/ND01_ ISBrin

            ingbasics.pdf


            Beef usually does not benefit from brining, unless you are
            corning it.

            ---

            Kathleen Chevalier

            northern Virginia, USA
          • Rice
            gals....what I do is just add water. you can use and stock....that compliments the meat. those large pork loin....they will just cut with a fork. and I had
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 3, 2008
              gals....what I do is just add water. you can use and stock....that compliments the meat. those large pork loin....they will just cut with a fork. and I had never cooked any before..the butcher is the one that told me to use water. it worked. I add water to everything that I cook in my little rival......and my DH thinks I am such a good cook, hehehehehehe..no , but I am not going to correct him.
              thanks

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            • erika
              Ever thought of turning the pork roast down side up, half way through? Works when I do it. Erika [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 3, 2008
                Ever thought of turning the pork roast down side up, half way through? Works when I do it.

                Erika

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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