Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: steelcut oatmeal problem

Expand Messages
  • Molly
    Steel cut oatmeal needs to be cooked much longer than Old Fashioned Oatmeal and you do not need to use as much water. I make steelcut oatmeal all the time and
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 3, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Steel cut oatmeal needs to be cooked much longer than Old Fashioned
      Oatmeal and you do not need to use as much water. I make steelcut
      oatmeal all the time and we love it because it is higher in fiber and
      iron than regular oatmeal.
      --- In slowcooker@yahoogroups.com, "kmbloss" <kmhbloss@...> wrote:
      >
      > When I made overnight oatmeal (8 hours) in the crock pot using
      > steelcut oats, I would describe it as slimy rather than creamy.
      Anyone
      > know why I ended up with this texture? I want to try again, but I
      want
      > creamy !!!
      > I don't know which recipe I used, probably the one from Beth
      > Henspergers slow cooker book, and the book is back at the library.
      > Thanks for any help,
      > Katharine
      >
    • NRW
      ... This is the recipe I use. It s adapted from Good Eats : 1 cup steel cut oats 1 cup dried blueberries 1 cup dried apricots 4 cups water 1/2 cup
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 3, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        kmbloss wrote:

        >When I made overnight oatmeal (8 hours) in the crock pot using
        >steelcut oats, I would describe it as slimy rather than creamy. Anyone
        >know why I ended up with this texture? I want to try again, but I want
        >creamy !!!
        >I don't know which recipe I used, probably the one from Beth
        >Henspergers slow cooker book, and the book is back at the library.
        >Thanks for any help,
        >Katharine
        >
        >
        >

        This is the recipe I use. It's adapted from "Good Eats":

        1 cup steel cut oats
        1 cup dried blueberries
        1 cup dried apricots
        4 cups water
        1/2 cup half-and-half

        In a slow cooker, combine all ingredients and set to low heat. Cover and
        let cook for 8 to 9 hours.

        Stir and remove to serving bowls. This method works best if started
        before you go to bed. This way your oatmeal will be finished by morning.

        Really, really, really good! Not slimy at all! :D







        To subscribe, send a message to sl
      • Brian Dermody
        I make steel cut oats in the crockpot all of the time. 1 cup oats to 4 cups of water, plus about a tsp of salt. I do it in my smaller 1 1/2 quart crock. I
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 4, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          I make steel cut oats in the crockpot all of the time. 1 cup oats to 4 cups
          of water, plus about a tsp of salt. I do it in my smaller 1 1/2 quart
          crock.

          I put the ingredients in the crockpot when I go to bed, but plug the
          crockpot into a kitchen timer. I set it to start cooking about 4 hours
          before I plan to eat. The oats are cooked just right, and are much better
          than normal Quaker oats. They reheat great for the rest of the week, one
          bowl at a time in the microwave.

          When I let them go a few hours longer than my normal 4 hours, they're
          nowhere near as good.




          Brian


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Lois Howard
          Would that be 4 hours on low? Thanks, Lois ... From: Brian Dermody To: slowcooker@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, March 4, 2007 10:14:04 AM
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 4, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Would that be 4 hours on low?

            Thanks,

            Lois



            ----- Original Message ----
            From: Brian Dermody <dermbrian@...>
            To: slowcooker@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, March 4, 2007 10:14:04 AM
            Subject: [slowcooker] Re:steelcut oatmeal problem













            I make steel cut oats in the crockpot all of the time. 1 cup oats to 4 cups

            of water, plus about a tsp of salt. I do it in my smaller 1 1/2 quart

            crock.



            I put the ingredients in the crockpot when I go to bed, but plug the

            crockpot into a kitchen timer. I set it to start cooking about 4 hours

            before I plan to eat. The oats are cooked just right, and are much better

            than normal Quaker oats. They reheat great for the rest of the week, one

            bowl at a time in the microwave.



            When I let them go a few hours longer than my normal 4 hours, they're

            nowhere near as good.



            Brian



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]














            <!--

            #ygrp-mlmsg {font-size:13px;font-family:arial,helvetica,clean,sans-serif;}
            #ygrp-mlmsg table {font-size:inherit;font:100%;}
            #ygrp-mlmsg select, input, textarea {font:99% arial,helvetica,clean,sans-serif;}
            #ygrp-mlmsg pre, code {font:115% monospace;}
            #ygrp-mlmsg * {line-height:1.22em;}
            #ygrp-text{
            font-family:Georgia;
            }
            #ygrp-text p{
            margin:0 0 1em 0;
            }
            #ygrp-tpmsgs{
            font-family:Arial;
            clear:both;
            }
            #ygrp-vitnav{
            padding-top:10px;
            font-family:Verdana;
            font-size:77%;
            margin:0;
            }
            #ygrp-vitnav a{
            padding:0 1px;
            }
            #ygrp-actbar{
            clear:both;
            margin:25px 0;
            white-space:nowrap;
            color:#666;
            text-align:right;
            }
            #ygrp-actbar .left{
            float:left;
            white-space:nowrap;
            }
            .bld{font-weight:bold;}
            #ygrp-grft{
            font-family:Verdana;
            font-size:77%;
            padding:15px 0;
            }
            #ygrp-ft{
            font-family:verdana;
            font-size:77%;
            border-top:1px solid #666;
            padding:5px 0;
            }
            #ygrp-mlmsg #logo{
            padding-bottom:10px;
            }

            #ygrp-vital{
            background-color:#e0ecee;
            margin-bottom:20px;
            padding:2px 0 8px 8px;
            }
            #ygrp-vital #vithd{
            font-size:77%;
            font-family:Verdana;
            font-weight:bold;
            color:#333;
            text-transform:uppercase;
            }
            #ygrp-vital ul{
            padding:0;
            margin:2px 0;
            }
            #ygrp-vital ul li{
            list-style-type:none;
            clear:both;
            border:1px solid #e0ecee;
            }
            #ygrp-vital ul li .ct{
            font-weight:bold;
            color:#ff7900;
            float:right;
            width:2em;
            text-align:right;
            padding-right:.5em;
            }
            #ygrp-vital ul li .cat{
            font-weight:bold;
            }
            #ygrp-vital a {
            text-decoration:none;
            }

            #ygrp-vital a:hover{
            text-decoration:underline;
            }

            #ygrp-sponsor #hd{
            color:#999;
            font-size:77%;
            }
            #ygrp-sponsor #ov{
            padding:6px 13px;
            background-color:#e0ecee;
            margin-bottom:20px;
            }
            #ygrp-sponsor #ov ul{
            padding:0 0 0 8px;
            margin:0;
            }
            #ygrp-sponsor #ov li{
            list-style-type:square;
            padding:6px 0;
            font-size:77%;
            }
            #ygrp-sponsor #ov li a{
            text-decoration:none;
            font-size:130%;
            }
            #ygrp-sponsor #nc {
            background-color:#eee;
            margin-bottom:20px;
            padding:0 8px;
            }
            #ygrp-sponsor .ad{
            padding:8px 0;
            }
            #ygrp-sponsor .ad #hd1{
            font-family:Arial;
            font-weight:bold;
            color:#628c2a;
            font-size:100%;
            line-height:122%;
            }
            #ygrp-sponsor .ad a{
            text-decoration:none;
            }
            #ygrp-sponsor .ad a:hover{
            text-decoration:underline;
            }
            #ygrp-sponsor .ad p{
            margin:0;
            }
            o {font-size:0;}
            .MsoNormal {
            margin:0 0 0 0;
            }
            #ygrp-text tt{
            font-size:120%;
            }
            blockquote{margin:0 0 0 4px;}
            .replbq {margin:4;}
            -->










            ____________________________________________________________________________________
            Need Mail bonding?
            Go to the Yahoo! Mail Q&A for great tips from Yahoo! Answers users.
            http://answers.yahoo.com/dir/?link=list&sid=396546091

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jan Greenberg
            Four hours on Low? I ve just cooked them overnight. I use the 1-1/2 qt cooker with 1-1/2 cups oats/4 cups water/ 1 TBS brown sugar/ 1 tsp cinnamon (approx).
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 5, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Four hours on Low? I've just cooked them overnight. I use the 1-1/2
              qt cooker with 1-1/2 cups oats/4 cups water/ 1 TBS brown sugar/ 1 tsp
              cinnamon (approx).
              I'll try your 1 to 4 ratio this week for an afternoon since I don't
              have a timer.

              thanks!
              Jan
            • Brian Dermody
              That s a good idea to try making them (Steel Cut Oats) during the day. When they are cooked right, they are absolutely every bit as good reheated in the
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 6, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                That's a good idea to try making them (Steel Cut Oats) during the day. When
                they are cooked right, they are absolutely every bit as good reheated in the
                microwave as they were on day one. Try a spoon full every hour or so and
                I'm sure you'll find a point where they are really, really good and not
                slimy.

                Good luck!

                Brian


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jan Greenberg
                My overnight oats only look slimy when I take off the lid. A good stir seems to take care of that. Whatever isn t eaten goes into a covered dish and is put
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 6, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  My overnight oats only look "slimy" when I take off the lid. A good
                  stir seems to take care of that. Whatever isn't eaten goes into a
                  covered dish and is put in the refrigerator. Leftovers are reheated
                  in the microwave in individual bowls as needed.
                  Does the 4 hour cooking time keep down the sticking? (Yes, I DO spray
                  the inside of the crock)
                  Jan
                • ambarre2000
                  I know I m way late in chiming in, but maybe try adding the salt after the cooking is complete. Having the salt present during the cooking process can affect
                  Message 8 of 11 , Mar 23, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I know I'm way late in chiming in, but maybe try adding the salt after
                    the cooking is complete. Having the salt present during the cooking
                    process can affect the consistency.

                    Amanda
                  • jangreen52
                    As recommended in a previous post, I tried the 1 cup steel-cut oats to 4 cups of water and only cooked it a few hours. I ve always cooked it overnight and used
                    Message 9 of 11 , Mar 24, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      As recommended in a previous post, I tried the 1 cup steel-cut oats to 4 cups of water and
                      only cooked it a few hours. I've always cooked it overnight and used 1-1/2 cup s-c oats to 4
                      cups water. The 1-4 ratio netted me oatmeal that was way too creamy with a "paste-like"
                      consistency. I'll probably go back to making it my usual way.
                      It WAS easier to clean up the crock, though.
                      Jan
                    • Lance M
                      What works for me is a 3 to 1 ratio, water to oats. Then if you add a cup of dehydrated fruit, it would add another cup of water. Usually I like to substitute
                      Message 10 of 11 , Mar 24, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        What works for me is a 3 to 1 ratio, water to oats. Then if you add a
                        cup of dehydrated fruit, it would add another cup of water.
                        Usually I like to substitute a cup of cream or milk for a cup of water.
                        That's the basic recipe from Alton Brown anyway.

                        >As recommended in a previous post, I tried the 1 cup steel-cut oats to 4 cups of water and
                        >only cooked it a few hours. I've always cooked it overnight and used 1-1/2 cup s-c oats to 4
                        >cups water. The 1-4 ratio netted me oatmeal that was way too creamy with a "paste-like"
                        >consistency. I'll probably go back to making it my usual way.
                        >It WAS easier to clean up the crock, though.
                        >Jan

                        =====
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.