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Re: [slowcooker] Need some help!!

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  • Kim Malo
    ... Hey Loni- I think a lot of others reading your request might have had the same problem I did - I ve no clue what, if any, the restrictions on such patients
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 4, 2005
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      At 03:58 PM 1/3/2005, jellybean1225@... wrote:
      >Hello to you all and I hope that you all had a Happy New Year. I
      >need some help. I'm looking for recipes that I can make in the
      >crockpot for main dishes that would work for patients who have had a
      >gastric bypass. I would appreciate any help that you may be able to
      >give me.
      >
      >Loni

      Hey Loni-
      I think a lot of others reading your request might have had the same
      problem I did - I've no clue what, if any, the restrictions on such
      patients are and so no idea of what to suggest. If you have a copy of the
      dietary instructions handy, you might want to re-post the question with
      more info about what's allowed and I bet you'll see more responses from the
      very helpful people here on the group.

      FWIW, based upon what I found on the web, it sounds like you start with
      high protein mushy foods, ultimately moving on to being able to eat
      everything so long as it is low in fat and sugar (the site wasn't clear if
      this was just to maintain weight loss or required otherwise), with the
      primary limitation being quantity.

      The mushy foods they suggested were:

      eggs - scrambled, softboiled, or in the form of egg salad. There are
      recipes for a number of egg based crockpot breakfast casseroles in the
      archives I know, but if I read this correctly, because of other less
      digestible or more fibrous ingredients, they probably aren't appropriate
      initially. Maybe as part of the transition to whole foods though? Here's an
      example of one that Debbi just posted that might be appropriate if made
      with low fat cheese, skim milk, etc.
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/slowcooker/message/25814
      many others in the group archives

      Dairy products - the recommendations sounded like non-crockpot oriented
      things like yoghurt.

      Legumes - this includes beans, lentils, and peas per the site, which adds
      that they should all be in a mushy form which will pass through the pouch
      easily. This is a really rich source of ideas for crockpot recipes. I know
      I've seen hopping john recipes, split pea soup, bean soups, etc. I would do
      a search of the archives using key words like beans, split peas, etc. You
      just should probably tweak any recipes to make sure the beans are a bit
      overcooked into the mushy stage and to minimize additions at least
      initially and to cut down on the fat. Here's a link to an navy bean soup
      from about a year ago to start you off
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/slowcooker/message/21502 and another basic
      bean with bacon soup (you'd probably want to eliminate the bacon at first,
      and substitute something like turkey bacon or a smoked turkey wing later)
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/slowcooker/message/17594

      After that initial stage eating, I'd look in the archives for the many
      recipes there are for chicken, beef, and other protein sources that use
      salsa and similar low fat but flavorful ingredients.

      Good luck, and please post back with more specifics about the dos and
      don'ts so that others will be inspired to offer their TNT favorites that
      might help.
      Kim
    • nitengal42in
      Kim, I am a long term gastric bypass patient. I had surgery over 2 years ago. I am hoping that others read this so that we may dispel some myths. After the
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 4, 2005
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        Kim,
        I am a long term gastric bypass patient. I had surgery over 2 years ago. I am hoping that others read this so that we may dispel some myths.

        After the initial healing time, gastric bypass patients eat normal foods, with a limitation in quantity, fat and sugar. Being over 2 years out, I eat normal portions.

        You can basically use any recipe in the archives. Just be sure to make protein your primary source of nutrition, with veggies and fruits as a secondary. It would help if I knew just how far out you were. I would be more than happy to help.

        Oh, and the surgery works if you follow the diet. I had my surgery 9/16/02 and lost 172 pounds. I had some reconstructive surgery earlier this year. I am now wearing a size 6-8, depending on who makes it. I weigh 138 pounds, started out at 310. Just follow the plan, and it will work for you.

        Stacey
      • Sheri Jacobs
        ... years ago. I am hoping that others read this so that we may dispel some myths. After the initial healing time, gastric bypass patients eat normal foods,
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 8, 2005
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          --- In slowcooker@yahoogroups.com, "nitengal42in" <nitengal42in@e...>
          wrote:

          > I am a long term gastric bypass patient. I had surgery over 2
          years ago. I am hoping that others read this so that we may dispel
          some myths. After the initial healing time, gastric bypass patients
          eat normal foods, with a limitation in quantity, fat and sugar.
          Being over 2 years out, I eat normal portions. <<

          **I agree that there are many myths to dispel regarding gastric
          bypass surgery. Yes, after the healing period, we do eat normal
          foods. However, we should not eat ALL normal foods. If we are going
          to keep our weight off long term (and my definition of long term is
          much longer than 2 years), we need to severely limit intake of sugar.
          While the bypass makes us malabsorb fat in varying degrees (depending
          on how far we are bypassed) we NEVER malabsorb sugar. And while
          eating sugar may or may not cause dumping syndrome, it always causes
          weight gain eventually. Even the sugar in fruit. And milk - it has 12
          grams of sugar per 8 ounce cup regardless of the fat content. I am
          about 3 years out and I do not eat normal portions. And with the size
          of my pouch (size of the end joint of your thumb when first made, now
          about the size of an egg), I never will.

          >> You can basically use any recipe in the archives. Just be sure to
          make protein your primary source of nutrition, with veggies and
          fruits as a secondary. It would help if I knew just how far out you
          were. I would be more than happy to help.<<

          **I am assuming that you are talking about savory recipes. I would
          never eat a recipe from the archives for a dessert without major
          revisions. My fruit intake is very small, too. And recipes with milk
          should be avoided, both due to possible lactose intolerance and due
          to the sugar calories in milk.

          Many gastric bypass patients cannot or choose to not eat rice,
          potatoes, pasta and other items made with refined/white flour. They
          can cause severe bloating, and they convert easily to sugar so again,
          possible weight gain. So recipes containing the above items should be
          limited and also altered to use whole grain flours or other whole
          grain options.

          >> Oh, and the surgery works if you follow the diet. I had my
          surgery 9/16/02 and lost 172 pounds. I had some reconstructive
          surgery earlier this year. I am now wearing a size 6-8, depending on
          who makes it. I weigh 138 pounds, started out at 310. Just follow
          the plan, and it will work for you.<<

          **Actually during the early rapid weight loss phase, people lose
          weight no matter what they eat. It may not be as rapid or as
          dramatic, but tender pouch/intestines, along with the reduction in
          the hunger that happens for a several months to a couple of years
          past the surgery date make weight loss during that period almost
          guaranteed. However, if good habits aren't ingrained during that
          time, it can cause incomplete weight loss or regain. And periods of
          time that come around - called the 2 year wall and/or the 3 year wall
          by many long term folks - where people become lax about taking the
          necessary vitamin and mineral and using protein supplements and
          having labs done regularly because they feel like they are 'done.'
          They want to be 'normal.' However, we have rerouted intestines, so we
          will never be normal again. Because they become lax, vitamin and
          mineral deficiencies start and often they aren't aware of what is
          happening until they crash. It might take years, but it can also take
          years to recover from the crash, if one ever does. So we need to be
          ever vigilant.

          I recommend the OSSG graduate group for any one who has had or who is
          considering gastric bypass surgery. Anyone can join and read the
          messages, but only those at least one year or more post surgery can
          respond to messages or post messages. Many of the people in that
          group are 5, 8, 10, even 20 years post op. It is a wonderful way to
          learn about the rewards and challenges of living long term with
          gastric bypass surgery. The address is
          http://health.groups.yahoo/group/Graduate-OSSG

          Sheri
          In Sunny Florida
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