Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [slowcooker] Beer in recipies

Expand Messages
  • Kim Malo
    ... Bet you re right with the chili. Or even some guy doing it more intentionally for a machismo mark. But I m pretty sure Belgian carbonade, a stew flavored
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      At 06:18 PM 10/30/2003, bunkeeburns wrote:
      >Is it just me or has anyone else wondered just how they come up with
      >using beer in recipes? There were two just recently; Beer Stew and
      >Beer Chili. Do you suppose some man (sorry guys!) came by and lifted
      >the lid for a little taste and said to himself, "hum, I wonder how a
      >little beer would taste in the recipe" and decided to 'doctor' it up?
      >
      >Just wondering........................:-)

      Bet you're right with the chili. Or even some guy doing it more
      intentionally for a machismo mark. But I'm pretty sure Belgian carbonade,
      a stew flavored with onions and beer, goes back centuries. As I understand
      it beer is sort of to Belgians as wine is to the French so probably a more
      intentional flavor enhancement. Haven't made it in the crock myself, but
      here's a basic recipe from http://www.a1priorities.com/page90.html that
      has some of the key elements - the dark beer, the brown sugar, the onions.
      I think there's usually a bit of vinegar in it too, and sometimes mustard.
      I also think the more classic form is to start with vey lean meat and
      include a bit of bacon for fat and flavor, like bourguignon

      Crock Pot Carbonnade

      Saute 2 large sliced onions (1/8" slices) in 4 Tbsp butter until they are
      totally soft. Add 1 tsp brown sugar and stir them around until they get
      brown and carmelized. Mix in lots of freshly ground black pepper and about
      2 tsp of fresh thyme. Put these in the bottom of the crockpot. Add 1 lb
      stewing beef in 1" chunks. Pour over 1 bottle dark beer. Crock for about 4
      hours on high. Then remove 1/2 c of the sauce. Stir in 1 Tbsp flour. Mix
      this back into the sauce. Crock on high for another 2 hours.

      Kim
    • Hilly van Zuylekom
      ... Beer is used a lot in cooking in Europe, especially in Belgium, Germany and the South of Holland. Beer was always cheaper than wine, freely available and
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 2, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        > Is it just me or has anyone else wondered just how they come up with
        > using beer in recipes?

        Beer is used a lot in cooking in Europe, especially in Belgium,
        Germany and the South of Holland. Beer was always cheaper than wine,
        freely available and in cooking it definitely tastes nicer than
        water!! It dates back to at least the Middle Ages (when water wasn't
        always drinkable), it was even used in Roman times. I guess whenever
        alcoholic beverages where available. people used them in cooking.

        I have a very simple recipe for beef in beer, it is quite delicious
        and very, very simple.

        Carbonade de boeuf flamande or to put it in more simple terms:
        "Flemish beef in beer" - serves 4

        2 pounds of steak (I would choose the cheaper cuts, you won't taste
        the difference!)
        4 onions
        salt and pepper
        1 tablespoon flour
        l bottle of stout

        The original recipe also mentioned to brown the beef in butter and
        olive oil, but I always leave that part out, it tastes just as good
        without them.
        Slice the onions very thinly and put them in the bottom of pot.
        Lightly salt and pepper the beef and roll in the flour. (I put the
        flour and salt and pepper in a plastic bag, put the cubed beef in as
        well and shake the bag until the meat is covered with the seasoned
        flour). Put beef cubes on top of onions, pour beer over the beef and
        cook on Low for about 6 hours (or until beef is tender). Serve with
        potato puree and boiled carrots or green beans. It's also very nice
        with egg noodles and mushrooms.
        I like to put in a lot more onions and to vary the recipe a bit I
        might occasionally add garlic or spices like basil or a bay leaf.
        The original recipe called for stout, a real hearty beer variety, but
        it also tastes good with lager (or any beer available). The stout
        however gives the dish a really, really nice flavour! It is simple
        cooking, but this recipe has survived hundreds of years.......


        )
        (
        Hilly )
        Glen Waverley, Vic. ___
        dutchoz@... c\_/
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.