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Denver Broncos UK show

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  • Dwight Swanson
    I thought there would be some Denver Broncos UK reviews by now, but since there s not, I ll give it a shot. I went to the Friday night show and it was one of
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 3, 2009
    I thought there would be some Denver Broncos UK reviews by now, but
    since there's not, I'll give it a shot.

    I went to the Friday night show and it was one of the more affecting
    concerts I've been to in years. The most singular thing about the show
    was the setting. It was in the basement of the Mattress Factory
    museum, in a room with a cavernous feel because of its stone walls (I
    don't know what it's usually used for). The audience was sitting in
    rows of chairs facing each other, with three video screens along the
    edges. Slim, Munly and Rev. Dwight were on rough-hewn small risers in
    kind of a triangular arrangement that made it impossible to see more
    than one of them at a time (I was sitting right in front of Munly,
    with Slim to my far left and Dwight to my far right). The whole place
    had a kind of 19th century mining camp feel to it (combining both the
    gold & silver mines of Colorado and the coal mines of Pennsylvania).
    Munly's guitar, for instance, was hung on the wall with a row of pick
    axes and shovels, and an old Victorian lamp provided his lighting.
    They only came together once, for Uncle John's Boat. The video screens
    showed a series long shots, mostly of bucolic landscape scenes and
    ending with shots of the moon.

    Munly played acoustic guitar throughout, Slim was on percussion (more
    percussion than actual drums), and Dwight alternated between autoharp,
    banjo (bowed more than picked) and melodica. They started with "Denver
    Broncos Fight Song" and according to the set list (which I've
    attached--I can't remember if the list allows attachments or not)
    played 13 songs and an encore. The tone was pretty uniformly
    melancholy, lightened with some levity by the Munly-esque lyrics
    (particularly in the story song "From The Estate of John Denver") .

    There was a lot of engagement with the audience, particularly because
    we were given free beers and the bottles inevitably made a racket as
    they fell over on the stone floor, much to Munly's consternation. At
    one point late in the show one woman got up to go to the bathroom and
    Munly said that he would halt the show until she returned--and he did.

    All in all, the feel was kind of the exact opposite of the chaos of an
    Auto Club show but equally good in its own way.

    Dwight
  • Kevin Bayer
    Thanks Dwight, Sounds awesome...anyone recording? Thank you, Kevin Bayer To: slimcessnasautoclub@yahoogroups.com From: dwswan@gmail.com Date: Mon, 3 Aug 2009
    Message 2 of 2 , Aug 3, 2009
      Thanks Dwight, Sounds awesome...anyone recording?

      Thank you,Kevin Bayer




      To: slimcessnasautoclub@yahoogroups.com
      From: dwswan@...
      Date: Mon, 3 Aug 2009 15:16:48 -0400
      Subject: [Slim Cessna's Auto Club] Denver Broncos UK show [1 Attachment]

       
      [Attachment(s) from Dwight Swanson included below]

      I thought there would be some Denver Broncos UK reviews by now, but
      since there's not, I'll give it a shot.

      I went to the Friday night show and it was one of the more affecting
      concerts I've been to in years. The most singular thing about the show
      was the setting. It was in the basement of the Mattress Factory
      museum, in a room with a cavernous feel because of its stone walls (I
      don't know what it's usually used for). The audience was sitting in
      rows of chairs facing each other, with three video screens along the
      edges. Slim, Munly and Rev. Dwight were on rough-hewn small risers in
      kind of a triangular arrangement that made it impossible to see more
      than one of them at a time (I was sitting right in front of Munly,
      with Slim to my far left and Dwight to my far right). The whole place
      had a kind of 19th century mining camp feel to it (combining both the
      gold & silver mines of Colorado and the coal mines of Pennsylvania) .
      Munly's guitar, for instance, was hung on the wall with a row of pick
      axes and shovels, and an old Victorian lamp provided his lighting.
      They only came together once, for Uncle John's Boat. The video screens
      showed a series long shots, mostly of bucolic landscape scenes and
      ending with shots of the moon.

      Munly played acoustic guitar throughout, Slim was on percussion (more
      percussion than actual drums), and Dwight alternated between autoharp,
      banjo (bowed more than picked) and melodica. They started with "Denver
      Broncos Fight Song" and according to the set list (which I've
      attached--I can't remember if the list allows attachments or not)
      played 13 songs and an encore. The tone was pretty uniformly
      melancholy, lightened with some levity by the Munly-esque lyrics
      (particularly in the story song "From The Estate of John Denver") .

      There was a lot of engagement with the audience, particularly because
      we were given free beers and the bottles inevitably made a racket as
      they fell over on the stone floor, much to Munly's consternation. At
      one point late in the show one woman got up to go to the bathroom and
      Munly said that he would halt the show until she returned--and he did.

      All in all, the feel was kind of the exact opposite of the chaos of an
      Auto Club show but equally good in its own way.

      Dwight



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