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Intelliscope or Classic - Continued

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  • Gene Baraff
    There was an earlier post (one that I just can t find now) that pointed out that use of the object locator and star hopping - learning the sky - were not
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 1, 2005
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      There was an earlier post (one that I just can't find now) that
      pointed out that use of the object locator and star hopping -
      learning the sky - were not "either-or" options - that one could be
      carried out in conjunction with the other.

      One way to do so is to reverse the procedure recommended in the
      excellent star-hopping learners guide "Turn Left At Orion". That
      book shows you how to go from the brightest nearby stars to an
      intermediate location by star hops in your finder, then what
      asterism (distinctive grouping of fainter stars) you should see in
      your finder, then where exactly to point your finder, then what you
      should see through your main scope.

      Doing this in reverse is also possible if you use the object
      locator: Use it to find your object, then after studying it in your
      scope, make sure its centered, then look in your finder to notice
      what asterism you see and where your cross hairs are pointed
      relative to that asterism. This will work for you no matter what
      kind of optical finder you are using - straight through (inverted
      image), RA (mirror-flipped image), or RACI (right angle correct
      image).

      It often pays to whip out your binoculars at this stage to see what
      the asterism looks like through them. Your bincluars - 7x to 10x -
      will undoubtedly show you a clearer view than your finder (or than
      most finders that those of us with inexpensive dobs are likley to
      have.)

      You might then have a look - either naked eye or through your 1 x
      finder - to see roughly where in the sky you are.

      The next time you go for that same object - and for teaching
      purposes, it might just as well be immediately after this first part
      of the lesson - reverse what you have just done: sweep the area
      with your binoculars for that asterism, point your finder at
      it, locate the cross hairs relative to the asterism, then
      finally look through your scope.

      And do this again the next time you are out, just to reinforce the
      images in your memory.

      Gene
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