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Re: molybdenum disulfide based lubricant (also for turtle wax)

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  • mauro_dalio
    ... I applied to the base. Then *very important* all grease in excess (that which is pushed at the side of pads raceways, and/or which collects on the lateral
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 1, 2005
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      > Did you apply the Molybdenum on the teflon pads, the base, or both?

      I applied to the base. Then *very important* all grease in excess (that which is pushed at
      the side of pads raceways, and/or which collects on the lateral faces of the pads, *must be
      removed*.

      What works for stiction is the solid lubricant (either graphyte or molybdenum). It reduces
      the start/up force. The oil/grease works for friction: it reduces friction when the speed is
      not zero. It does that by providing a *hydrodynamic* lubrication. You do not want that
      because the decrease of friction after break-away is the cause of jumpy motion!. Thus you
      have to remove all lubricant in excess (absorb it with a tissue) which might otherwise re-
      enter between pads and base causing sudden decrease of friction and stick slip.
      "Normal" lubricants (i.e. those which have not any anti-stiction additive -solid lubricants-)
      canot work because when the motion stops they slowly creep out of the pads (or in small
      pockets). Thus friction force increases after the stop (gradually in time). Then, at break-
      away the lubricant re-emnters and cause stick slip.

      What basically should be obtained is a overcoating of solid lubricant (graphyte or
      molibdenum) onto the base. I found a combination of grease/molibdenum (but the
      interest is onloy for the latter). There also exists molykote, which is a breed of different
      lubricants. One of these is made of a dispersed phase of mylibdenum into a polimer.
      When spayed onto a surface the polimer forms a thin solid polimeric matrix that embeds
      grains of the solid lubricants. In operation wear exposes the solid lubricants. I would like
      to try it (but I did not find it within the 500 meter accepted distance from my home ;-).
    • Gene Baraff
      ... ... Star ... _tiny_ ... have ... When you relubricate, do you have to separate the base plate (the piece that rests directly on the ground)
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 1, 2005
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        --- In skyquest-telescopes@yahoogroups.com, Phil Lefever
        <kb0nes@c...>
        wrote:
        > For my scope I ended up laminating the rocker box base with Ebony
        Star
        > and swapped the stock PTFE pads for virgin Teflon ones. I clean the
        > azimuth bearings about every 4th time I use the scope and apply a
        _tiny_
        > trace of Carnauba paste auto wax. This is the best combination I
        have
        > come up with.
        >
        > ***************
        When you relubricate, do you have to separate the base plate (the
        piece that rests directly on the ground) from the rocker box (the
        part
        that rotates on the azimuth axis bolt) so as to reach the teflon pads
        for cleaning and rewaxing,

        or is it sufficient for you to just turn the whole assembly upside
        down and clean and rewax only the bottom of the rocker box, rotating
        the base plate as you do so, so as to eventually rewax the entire
        bottom of the rocker box?

        This assumes that your base plate, like mine, is a triangle that
        allows you to see about half of the bottom of the rocker box without
        rotating it.

        Gene
      • Phil Lefever
        ... Gene, I have the same original GS made XT-10 as you do with the triangular ground board. The triangular board is a mixed blessing as it exposes the
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 3, 2005
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          >When you relubricate, do you have to separate the base plate (the
          >piece that rests directly on the ground) from the rocker box (the
          >part
          >that rotates on the azimuth axis bolt) so as to reach the teflon pads
          >for cleaning and rewaxing,
          >
          >or is it sufficient for you to just turn the whole assembly upside
          >down and clean and rewax only the bottom of the rocker box, rotating
          >the base plate as you do so, so as to eventually rewax the entire
          >bottom of the rocker box?
          >
          >This assumes that your base plate, like mine, is a triangle that
          >allows you to see about half of the bottom of the rocker box without
          >rotating it.

          Gene,

          I have the same original GS made XT-10 as you do with the triangular
          ground board. The triangular board is a mixed blessing as it exposes
          the bearings to dew and dirt but allows easier cleaning.

          When I clean and wax I usually just rotate the ground board and clean
          and wax the bearing radius on the rocker box base. Every once and again
          I will pull the base apart to really clean the pads and look for any
          embedded particles in the Teflon.

          When I was the Ebony Star it is pretty sparingly and I wait for it to
          dry then I buff as much off as possible. My wax of choice is Eagle 1
          Pure Carnauba paste.

          Clear Skies,

          PL

          --------------------------------------------------------------------
          Phil Lefever - Burnsville, MN
          Amateur Radio Callsign - KB0NES EN34jt
          C8-SP XT-10 C102 80WV
          MNAA & MAS Member
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