Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

What's New for Jun 28, 2002

Expand Messages
  • What's New by way of Joe Littrell
    WHAT S NEW Robert L. Park Friday, 28 Jun 02 Washington, DC 1. FREE ENERGY: APS BOARD SPEAKS OUT ON PERPETUAL MOTION. Well, it s not exactly the frontier
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 28, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      WHAT'S NEW Robert L. Park Friday, 28 Jun 02 Washington, DC

      1. FREE ENERGY: APS BOARD SPEAKS OUT ON PERPETUAL MOTION. Well,
      it's not exactly the frontier of physics research, but somebody
      had to say it. Already this year we've had the Jasker Power
      System (WN 25 Jan 02), Chukanov Quantum Energy (WN 8 Feb 02), and
      the Motionless Electromagnetic Generator (WN 5 Apr 02). Not to
      mention Bubble Fusion (WN 1 Mar 02), hydrino rockets (WN 21 Jun
      02), and whatever scam Dennis Lee is running now (WN 3 May 02).
      So, on Saturday, 22 June, the Executive Board of the American
      Physical Society unanimously adopted the following statement:

      "The Executive Board of the American Physical Society
      is concerned that in this period of unprecedented
      scientific advance, misguided or fraudulent claims of
      perpetual motion machines and other sources of
      unlimited free energy are proliferating. Such devices
      would directly violate the most fundamental laws of
      Nature, laws that have guided the scientific advances
      that are transforming our world."

      2. COUNTER-TERRORISM: ACADEMY STUDY EXAMINES THE ROLE OF SCIENCE.
      "In the war against terrorism," the President declared on 6 June,
      "America's vast science and technology base provides us with a
      key advantage." In a report released this week, a huge committee
      of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of
      Engineering and the Institute of Medicine, lists actions that
      need to be taken immediately to protect the nation: controlling
      nuclear materials, producing vaccines, improving ventilation
      systems, etc. That'll fix 'em. The report will be examined
      carefully by terrorists, not to discover new opportunities--there
      are lots of those--but to scratch old ideas off their list.

      3. CYBER-TERRORISM: WAS THAT ON THE ACADEMY LIST? The FBI is
      watching suspicious electronic "visits" to digital systems that
      control such things as flood gates in dams, reactor cooling in
      nuclear power plants, and air traffic. The possibility that such
      controls might be manipulated raises the specter of the Internet
      being used, not just to disrupt or shut down facilities, but to
      turn them into weapons. It demonstrates how difficult it is to
      anticipate where or how terrorists might strike.

      4. DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION: SENATE BILL CREATES A DILEMMA FOR BUSH.
      The White House made it clear that any bill that cut $814M from
      missile defense, as the Democratic version did, would get vetoed.
      In a classic compromise, the money was restored, but the language
      left it to the President to decide whether to spend it on defense
      against non-existent missiles or in the war against terrorism.
      Why not both? Just hire Arthur Anderson to keep the books.

      (Christy Fernandez assisted with this week's What's New.)
      THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND and THE AMERICAN PHYSICAL SOCIETY
      Opinions are the author's and are not necessarily shared by the
      University or the American Physical Society, but they should be.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.