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Re: Help ignorance

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  • andy_chat_monster
    Terry said - ... Hey! lucky you! ... Yeah but now you have a *great* opportunity to learn without wasting any money :) ... First idea: if you are in the UK,
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 1, 2002
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      Terry said -

      > I've just aquired 2 towers 3 monitors 3 printers load of routers
      > 5 key boards and boxs mouses and cables

      Hey! lucky you!

      > I no little about these things

      Yeah but now you have a *great* opportunity to learn without wasting
      any money :)

      > what is best for me to do?

      First idea: if you are in the UK, email me and give all that lovely
      second-user stuff to me ;)

      Second, read as much as you can online aboyut fixing machines (start
      at www.pcguide.com or type "building PC" into Google) then invest in
      a few very basic tools and start taking the machines apart.

      Getting free gear and disassembling and reassesembling is *exactly*
      how I started. This will teach you where everything fits at the very
      least.

      Third idea: the monitors may be worth a few bucks so try selling your
      newly-acquired stuff through your local newspaper, through a
      conmputer magazine, or any online auction site such as ebay.

      Think positive! Look on this as a learning opportunity! Good luck!

      Andy
    • andy_chat_monster
      Further to Terry s original post and my reply. ... OK Terry, here s a little story. Today I visited my local civic ammenities tip (in the UK this means a place
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 1, 2002
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        Further to Terry's original post and my reply.

        Terry had:
        > > ... just aquired 2 towers 3 monitors 3 printers load of routers
        > > 5 key boards and boxs mouses and cables

        and I said:

        > ... now you have a *great* opportunity to learn without wasting
        > any money

        I advised Terry to:

        > ... invest in
        > a few very basic tools and start taking the machines apart...
        > ... disassembling and reassesembling ....
        > will teach you where everything fits ...

        OK Terry, here's a little story. Today I visited my local civic
        ammenities tip (in the UK this means a place where the public can
        dispose of rubbish that is too bulky for the garbage can). I found
        several old computers in the scrap metal disposal skip.

        Two were very battered and when I took the case covers off I could
        see they were very outdated and both had had the memory taken out.
        Despite that, I stripped them down and thereby acquired three hard
        drives, two floppy drives, one Cyrix 6x86 MII chip, one good PSU, one
        (ageing) CD drive, plus loads of cabling, screws, ports etc.

        The third machine was obviously complete (though the CD drive was
        missing and it was battered and dirty outside). I plugged it in.
        WHOOSH! The PSU spluttered and the lights went out! (In the UK,
        houses have RCD-type current breakers which are far more sensitive
        than fuses or normal overload circuit-breakers). Nothing daunted, I
        unplugged by torchlight then restored the domestic power. I swapped
        the PSU for the one I'd got out of the other machine and tried again.
        Bingo!

        I now have an AT in a midi tower, PentiumMMX 266, 64MB EDO Ram, 1GB
        hdd, 4MB video card. And it works fine! It even booted straight into
        Win98SE. It's got Office and other software. It's a ready-to-go basic
        workhorse. By tomoro it will have a modem. By Wednesday it will (I
        hope) be sold.

        Morals? Never look a gift horse in the mouth; familiarise yourself
        with basic computer hardware/software techniques; never throw away
        spare bits, cables, screws etc.

        Hope this encourages you - and others - to have a go at computer
        maintenance/rebuilding.

        If so, one caution. NEVER WORK ON A COMPUTER THAT IS PLUGGED IN TO A
        LIVE WALL SOCKET.

        One further moral. The puter I describe above not only booted into
        Windows: it also had all the work and emails and other user data of
        the last user. From briefly looking through the files, I found out
        that it had belonged to the local office of a national public-service
        organisation and had been the workstation for a secretary or clerk
        called Josie. I learned that Josie dealt with people called X, Y and
        Z at organisations A, B and C. I also learnt that and that she spent
        work time emailing friends via Hotmail, looking at online Vogue
        magazine, and shopping from catalogues. I guess Josie hadn't cottoned
        on to deleting temporary internet files LOL. Win386.swp was pretty
        interesting too, once I'd transferred its contents to another machine
        and opened it in Wordpad ;)

        Moral? ALWAYS THOROUGHLY WIPE the hard drive of any machine before
        you throw it out or pass it on.

        Cheerfully,

        Andy
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