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Re: [Simply Computers] Re: Gateway E-3600 Not wanting to boot! Help!

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  • Norm Higgs
    While the rest of your post is fine and good advice, I can t imagine where you got this idea from. The fact is that there IS no port 80 until your operating
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      While the rest of your post is fine and good advice, I can't imagine
      where you got this idea from. The fact is that there IS no 'port 80'
      until your operating system loads up. Port 80 is used by Web servers. It
      has nothing to do with POST cards.

      Norm Higgs
      http://forbiddenpc.com
      https://www.linkedin.com/e/fpf/4018099

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Manolo Rosana" <frontslashperiod@...>
      To: <simplycomputers2@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 9:48 AM
      Subject: Re: [Simply Computers] Re: Gateway E-3600 Not wanting to boot!
      Help!


      it displays its output to port 80 before there is any video. >


      > ----- Original Message ----
      > From: avbsantos2 <avbsantos2@...>
      > To: simplycomputers2@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 2:13:49 AM
      > Subject: [Simply Computers] Re: Gateway E-3600 Not wanting to boot!
      Help!
      >
      > Try doing a "Barebones Boot Attempt":
      >
      > 1. Remove the motherboard from the case and set it on a non conductive
      > surface, such as a piece of card board.
      >
      > 2. Remove any non essential components required to post into BIOS.
      > This should leave you with just a CPU, Heatsink and Fan, 1 stick of
      > memory, and a video Card.
      >
      > 3. Clear your CMOS by moving the CMOS jumper to the clear position for
      > a few minutes, you might even want to remove the battery as well.
      > Replace the battery in its holder and replace the CMOS jumper to the
      > normal operating position.
      >
      > 4. Remove your PSU from the case as well and set it on your workbench
      > next to the motherboard. Connect the power leads to the motherboard,
      > you should have a 20 or 24 pin connector as well as a square 4 pin
      > connector that need to be connected.
      >
      > 5. Hook your keyboard up to the back of the board.
      >
      > 6. Turn the power switch on the back of your PSU to the on position.
      >
      > 7. If you do not have your case power button to work with, if ATX,
      > you're going to have to locate the two pins that your power switch
      > would normally hook up to, this information is easily found in your
      > motherboard manual. All you have to do is short the two pins by
      > touching both of them at the same time with a flat blade screwdriver
      > for just an instant. The board will start up once you short the pins.
      >
      > A process of elimination of the components as to which is being the
      > probable cause for not POSTing should lead you to the culprit. For
      > instance, if you know the RAM is good and that the graphics adapter is
      > good, and that the CPU is good, then suspect the PSU or the MOBO, and
      > so on.
      >
      > Do throw in a new CMOS battery, it's cheap enough and may well be
      "IT".
      >
      > If your board posts and your able to enter CMOS, then you most likely
      > have one of two things going on:
      >
      > 1. First thing could be a shorting out issue while the board is
      > installed in your case. The easiest way I have found to remedy this
      > situation is to use those little red paper washers between the
      > mounting studs and the bottom of your motherboard. You also want to
      > make sure that you dont have any extra mounting studs installed that
      > could be shorting out the underside of your board. Each mounting stud
      > should have a corresponding hole in the motherboard.
      >
      > 2. Second possibility might be a Power supply unit that does not have
      > the neccessary wattage or amperage output to satisfy your system with
      > all your components hooked up. The days of "any old" power supply
      > working in a computer are long gone, quality PSU's are a must with
      > todays higher end systems.
      >
      > HTH,
      > Armando
      > -- In simplycomputers2@ yahoogroups. com, "Giles" <phoenixfire@ ...>
      wrote:
      > >
      > > I recently procured an "old" Gateway E-3600 desktop. It's a Pentium
      > > 4, so I wanted to revive it and possibly install Ubuntu or SUSE
      Linux
      > > on it.
      > >
      > > I plugged the sucker in, attached a monitor, keyboard, and mouse and
      > > started it up. I waited a while, but nothing happenned. The monitor
      > > didn't even register a signal. I didn't hear the hard drives
      > > spinning. No beeps. Nothing, but the whir of the fans. Seems like
      > > there's no POST.
      > >
      > > I've tried different monitors, different power cables, taking out
      the
      > > RAM, removing the PCI/AGP cards, checking cable/card connections,
      > > disconnecting the drives, and such, but to no avail.
      > >
      > > I thought about updating the BIOS, but I can't boot from the floppy
      > > (no boot sequence).
      > >
      > > I was thinking that the battery inside was dead. Would that affect
      > > this?
      > >
      > > I'm basically stumped. Anyone else have an idea? Anything else I
      > > could try, besides buying new components/computer ?
      > >
      > > Any help is greatly appreciated!
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      ________________________________________________________________________
      ____________
      > Do you Yahoo!?
      > Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
      > http://new.mail.yahoo.com
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > Visit Simply Computers Tech Support Group and Helpdesk (24x7).
      Providing 100% free Computer Tech Support since 1999. With over 10,000
      members Simply Computers is one of the largest and most active Tech
      Support Forums on the Internet.
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/simplycomputers2/
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Manolo Rosana
      Hi Norm, I wasn t talking about the port 80 on the software side, I was talking about the port 80h (hexadecimal ) in hardware side. Sorry for the confusion.
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Norm,

        I wasn't talking about the port 80 on the software side, I was talking about the port 80h (hexadecimal ) in hardware side. Sorry for the confusion. Have you ever used a POST reader card before? If not, give it a try. It's cheap and it would help you a lot in your hardware troubleshooting specially when your computer has no video or it only displays that dreaded cursor on the top left corner of the screen and nothing else to go by except that sound coming from the speaker if any.

        I wouldn't be surprised if you haven't heard how POST reader card works because there's not much written about it for end users. Because of this reason, not all small system integrator use it because they are unaware of its existence. But, any BIOS engineer or hardware engineer who develops motherboards would tell you what a POST reader does and how it works.

        I know what I'm talking about because I work with a BIOS and hardware engineer before and we use POST card reader alot.

        BTW, once your system boots up, the POST reader card is of no use.

        -FrontSlashPeriod



        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Norm Higgs <norm@...>
        To: simplycomputers2@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, February 1, 2007 1:42:15 AM
        Subject: Re: [Simply Computers] Re: Gateway E-3600 Not wanting to boot! Help!

        While the rest of your post is fine and good advice, I can't imagine
        where you got this idea from. The fact is that there IS no 'port 80'
        until your operating system loads up. Port 80 is used by Web servers. It
        has nothing to do with POST cards.

        Norm Higgs
        http://forbiddenpc. com
        https://www. linkedin. com/e/fpf/ 4018099

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Manolo Rosana" <frontslashperiod@ yahoo.com>
        To: <simplycomputers2@ yahoogroups. com>
        Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 9:48 AM
        Subject: Re: [Simply Computers] Re: Gateway E-3600 Not wanting to boot!
        Help!

        it displays its output to port 80 before there is any video. >

        > ----- Original Message ----
        > From: avbsantos2 <avbsantos2@yahoo. com>
        > To: simplycomputers2@ yahoogroups. com
        > Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 2:13:49 AM
        > Subject: [Simply Computers] Re: Gateway E-3600 Not wanting to boot!
        Help!
        >
        > Try doing a "Barebones Boot Attempt":
        >
        > 1. Remove the motherboard from the case and set it on a non conductive
        > surface, such as a piece of card board.
        >
        > 2. Remove any non essential components required to post into BIOS.
        > This should leave you with just a CPU, Heatsink and Fan, 1 stick of
        > memory, and a video Card.
        >
        > 3. Clear your CMOS by moving the CMOS jumper to the clear position for
        > a few minutes, you might even want to remove the battery as well.
        > Replace the battery in its holder and replace the CMOS jumper to the
        > normal operating position.
        >
        > 4. Remove your PSU from the case as well and set it on your workbench
        > next to the motherboard. Connect the power leads to the motherboard,
        > you should have a 20 or 24 pin connector as well as a square 4 pin
        > connector that need to be connected.
        >
        > 5. Hook your keyboard up to the back of the board.
        >
        > 6. Turn the power switch on the back of your PSU to the on position.
        >
        > 7. If you do not have your case power button to work with, if ATX,
        > you're going to have to locate the two pins that your power switch
        > would normally hook up to, this information is easily found in your
        > motherboard manual. All you have to do is short the two pins by
        > touching both of them at the same time with a flat blade screwdriver
        > for just an instant. The board will start up once you short the pins.
        >
        > A process of elimination of the components as to which is being the
        > probable cause for not POSTing should lead you to the culprit. For
        > instance, if you know the RAM is good and that the graphics adapter is
        > good, and that the CPU is good, then suspect the PSU or the MOBO, and
        > so on.
        >
        > Do throw in a new CMOS battery, it's cheap enough and may well be
        "IT".
        >
        > If your board posts and your able to enter CMOS, then you most likely
        > have one of two things going on:
        >
        > 1. First thing could be a shorting out issue while the board is
        > installed in your case. The easiest way I have found to remedy this
        > situation is to use those little red paper washers between the
        > mounting studs and the bottom of your motherboard. You also want to
        > make sure that you dont have any extra mounting studs installed that
        > could be shorting out the underside of your board. Each mounting stud
        > should have a corresponding hole in the motherboard.
        >
        > 2. Second possibility might be a Power supply unit that does not have
        > the neccessary wattage or amperage output to satisfy your system with
        > all your components hooked up. The days of "any old" power supply
        > working in a computer are long gone, quality PSU's are a must with
        > todays higher end systems.
        >
        > HTH,
        > Armando
        > -- In simplycomputers2@ yahoogroups. com, "Giles" <phoenixfire@ ...>
        wrote:
        > >
        > > I recently procured an "old" Gateway E-3600 desktop. It's a Pentium
        > > 4, so I wanted to revive it and possibly install Ubuntu or SUSE
        Linux
        > > on it.
        > >
        > > I plugged the sucker in, attached a monitor, keyboard, and mouse and
        > > started it up. I waited a while, but nothing happenned. The monitor
        > > didn't even register a signal. I didn't hear the hard drives
        > > spinning. No beeps. Nothing, but the whir of the fans. Seems like
        > > there's no POST.
        > >
        > > I've tried different monitors, different power cables, taking out
        the
        > > RAM, removing the PCI/AGP cards, checking cable/card connections,
        > > disconnecting the drives, and such, but to no avail.
        > >
        > > I thought about updating the BIOS, but I can't boot from the floppy
        > > (no boot sequence).
        > >
        > > I was thinking that the battery inside was dead. Would that affect
        > > this?
        > >
        > > I'm basically stumped. Anyone else have an idea? Anything else I
        > > could try, besides buying new components/computer ?
        > >
        > > Any help is greatly appreciated!
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
        ____________
        > Do you Yahoo!?
        > Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
        > http://new.mail. yahoo.com
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > Visit Simply Computers Tech Support Group and Helpdesk (24x7).
        Providing 100% free Computer Tech Support since 1999. With over 10,000
        members Simply Computers is one of the largest and most active Tech
        Support Forums on the Internet.
        > http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/simplycomp uters2/
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >






        ____________________________________________________________________________________
        Have a burning question?
        Go to www.Answers.yahoo.com and get answers from real people who know.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Norm Higgs
        Thank you for the clarification. Norm Higgs http://forbiddenpc.com https://www.linkedin.com/e/fpf/4018099 ... From: Manolo Rosana
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Thank you for the clarification.

          Norm Higgs
          http://forbiddenpc.com
          https://www.linkedin.com/e/fpf/4018099

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Manolo Rosana" <frontslashperiod@...>
          To: <simplycomputers2@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 9:10 AM
          Subject: Re: [Simply Computers] Re: Gateway E-3600 Not wanting to boot!
          Help!


          > Hi Norm,
          >
          > I wasn't talking about the port 80 on the software side, I was
          talking about the port 80h (hexadecimal ) in hardware side. Sorry for
          the confusion. Have you ever used a POST reader card before? If not,
          give it a try. It's cheap and it would help you a lot in your hardware
          troubleshooting specially when your computer has no video or it only
          displays that dreaded cursor on the top left corner of the screen and
          nothing else to go by except that sound coming from the speaker if any.
          >
          > I wouldn't be surprised if you haven't heard how POST reader card
          works because there's not much written about it for end users. Because
          of this reason, not all small system integrator use it because they are
          unaware of its existence. But, any BIOS engineer or hardware engineer
          who develops motherboards would tell you what a POST reader does and how
          it works.
          >
          > I know what I'm talking about because I work with a BIOS and hardware
          engineer before and we use POST card reader alot.
          >
          > BTW, once your system boots up, the POST reader card is of no use.
          >
          > -FrontSlashPeriod
          >
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message ----
          > From: Norm Higgs <norm@...>
          > To: simplycomputers2@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Thursday, February 1, 2007 1:42:15 AM
          > Subject: Re: [Simply Computers] Re: Gateway E-3600 Not wanting to
          boot! Help!
          >
          > While the rest of your post is fine and good advice, I can't imagine
          > where you got this idea from. The fact is that there IS no 'port 80'
          > until your operating system loads up. Port 80 is used by Web servers.
          It
          > has nothing to do with POST cards.
          >
          > Norm Higgs
          > http://forbiddenpc. com
          > https://www. linkedin. com/e/fpf/ 4018099
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "Manolo Rosana" <frontslashperiod@ yahoo.com>
          > To: <simplycomputers2@ yahoogroups. com>
          > Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 9:48 AM
          > Subject: Re: [Simply Computers] Re: Gateway E-3600 Not wanting to
          boot!
          > Help!
          >
          > it displays its output to port 80 before there is any video. >
          >
          > > ----- Original Message ----
          > > From: avbsantos2 <avbsantos2@yahoo. com>
          > > To: simplycomputers2@ yahoogroups. com
          > > Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 2:13:49 AM
          > > Subject: [Simply Computers] Re: Gateway E-3600 Not wanting to boot!
          > Help!
          > >
          > > Try doing a "Barebones Boot Attempt":
          > >
          > > 1. Remove the motherboard from the case and set it on a non
          conductive
          > > surface, such as a piece of card board.
          > >
          > > 2. Remove any non essential components required to post into BIOS.
          > > This should leave you with just a CPU, Heatsink and Fan, 1 stick of
          > > memory, and a video Card.
          > >
          > > 3. Clear your CMOS by moving the CMOS jumper to the clear position
          for
          > > a few minutes, you might even want to remove the battery as well.
          > > Replace the battery in its holder and replace the CMOS jumper to the
          > > normal operating position.
          > >
          > > 4. Remove your PSU from the case as well and set it on your
          workbench
          > > next to the motherboard. Connect the power leads to the motherboard,
          > > you should have a 20 or 24 pin connector as well as a square 4 pin
          > > connector that need to be connected.
          > >
          > > 5. Hook your keyboard up to the back of the board.
          > >
          > > 6. Turn the power switch on the back of your PSU to the on position.
          > >
          > > 7. If you do not have your case power button to work with, if ATX,
          > > you're going to have to locate the two pins that your power switch
          > > would normally hook up to, this information is easily found in your
          > > motherboard manual. All you have to do is short the two pins by
          > > touching both of them at the same time with a flat blade screwdriver
          > > for just an instant. The board will start up once you short the
          pins.
          > >
          > > A process of elimination of the components as to which is being the
          > > probable cause for not POSTing should lead you to the culprit. For
          > > instance, if you know the RAM is good and that the graphics adapter
          is
          > > good, and that the CPU is good, then suspect the PSU or the MOBO,
          and
          > > so on.
          > >
          > > Do throw in a new CMOS battery, it's cheap enough and may well be
          > "IT".
          > >
          > > If your board posts and your able to enter CMOS, then you most
          likely
          > > have one of two things going on:
          > >
          > > 1. First thing could be a shorting out issue while the board is
          > > installed in your case. The easiest way I have found to remedy this
          > > situation is to use those little red paper washers between the
          > > mounting studs and the bottom of your motherboard. You also want to
          > > make sure that you dont have any extra mounting studs installed that
          > > could be shorting out the underside of your board. Each mounting
          stud
          > > should have a corresponding hole in the motherboard.
          > >
          > > 2. Second possibility might be a Power supply unit that does not
          have
          > > the neccessary wattage or amperage output to satisfy your system
          with
          > > all your components hooked up. The days of "any old" power supply
          > > working in a computer are long gone, quality PSU's are a must with
          > > todays higher end systems.
          > >
          > > HTH,
          > > Armando
          > > -- In simplycomputers2@ yahoogroups. com, "Giles" <phoenixfire@ ...>
          > wrote:
          > > >
          > > > I recently procured an "old" Gateway E-3600 desktop. It's a
          Pentium
          > > > 4, so I wanted to revive it and possibly install Ubuntu or SUSE
          > Linux
          > > > on it.
          > > >
          > > > I plugged the sucker in, attached a monitor, keyboard, and mouse
          and
          > > > started it up. I waited a while, but nothing happenned. The
          monitor
          > > > didn't even register a signal. I didn't hear the hard drives
          > > > spinning. No beeps. Nothing, but the whir of the fans. Seems like
          > > > there's no POST.
          > > >
          > > > I've tried different monitors, different power cables, taking out
          > the
          > > > RAM, removing the PCI/AGP cards, checking cable/card connections,
          > > > disconnecting the drives, and such, but to no avail.
          > > >
          > > > I thought about updating the BIOS, but I can't boot from the
          floppy
          > > > (no boot sequence).
          > > >
          > > > I was thinking that the battery inside was dead. Would that affect
          > > > this?
          > > >
          > > > I'm basically stumped. Anyone else have an idea? Anything else I
          > > > could try, besides buying new components/computer ?
          > > >
          > > > Any help is greatly appreciated!
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
          > ____________
          > > Do you Yahoo!?
          > > Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
          > > http://new.mail. yahoo.com
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Visit Simply Computers Tech Support Group and Helpdesk (24x7).
          > Providing 100% free Computer Tech Support since 1999. With over 10,000
          > members Simply Computers is one of the largest and most active Tech
          > Support Forums on the Internet.
          > > http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/simplycomp uters2/
          > >
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          ________________________________________________________________________
          ____________
          > Have a burning question?
          > Go to www.Answers.yahoo.com and get answers from real people who know.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > Visit Simply Computers Tech Support Group and Helpdesk (24x7).
          Providing 100% free Computer Tech Support since 1999. With over 10,000
          members Simply Computers is one of the largest and most active Tech
          Support Forums on the Internet.
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/simplycomputers2/
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
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