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Litha

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  • Silver Shadow
    Hello all :) The Wheel of the the Year is slowly turning. I am sure everyone has noticed the dramtic increase in the temp outside! Midsummer is upon us as
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2011
      Hello all :)

      The Wheel of the the Year is slowly turning. I am sure everyone has noticed the dramtic increase in the temp outside! Midsummer is upon us as our Summer Solstice and otherwise known as Litha or the Feast of the Fairy.

      Midsummer is consummation.
      Peak of life the elevation,
      Between the fires and the vales,
      God and Goddess happy sails.
      Fire and water in a balance,
      joined and formed in elegance.
      Steamy dance of high creation,
      giving vent to Earthly Station.

      - Raven's Wing

      Litha is one of the four solar festivals of the Wheel and is the time when the God commands the ripening and blossoming of the fields and nature. Litha is on the longest day of the year. There is traditionally much celebration for all of our blessings that have come to fruition.

      One legend says that Litha is the night that the fairy world is most active and easier to see. (Think the play A Midsummer Night's Dream.) One legend says that rubbing fern seed on your eyes at the stroke of midnight would enable you to see the fae more easily. A word of caution....do not invite fairies into your home. They are mischevious little things.

      The bonfires that are lit in ceebration of Midsummer are said to be remnants of the Druid rites to ward off evil spirits and honor the Sun.

      Now is also the time to gather your herbs. They are said to be most potent on this night. This peak in the harvesting season should be noted and these herbs marked as such for use in certain spells.

      All this being said....we are celebrating together on our Midsummer night. This makes my heart very happy. We wish to honor the God and Goddess as much as we can in the public setting we have chosen. Vision and I will be bringing a few things such as summer flowers to make a small (subtle and discreet) altar on our table. Please feel free to bring anything small that you would like to contribute.

      We look so forward to seeing everyone.

      Blessed be....Love and light...
      Shadow
    • Trinity Songbird
      when and where is the Litha gathering? I would love to come   Senebty TRINITY If you take the Christian Bible and put it out into the rain, wind and snow,
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1, 2011
        when and where is the Litha gathering? I would love to come
         
        Senebty
        TRINITY
         
        " If you take the Christian Bible and put it out into the rain, wind and snow, it will soon dissolve. Our religion IS the rain, wind and snow."---as said to an herbalist by a Native American medicine woman.
        "What other people think of me is none of my business." unknown



        From: Silver Shadow <silvershadow3x@...>
        To: silverliningcircle@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, June 1, 2011 6:31:36 AM
        Subject: [silverliningcircle] Litha

         

        Hello all :)

        The Wheel of the the Year is slowly turning. I am sure everyone has noticed the dramtic increase in the temp outside! Midsummer is upon us as our Summer Solstice and otherwise known as Litha or the Feast of the Fairy.

        Midsummer is consummation.
        Peak of life the elevation,
        Between the fires and the vales,
        God and Goddess happy sails.
        Fire and water in a balance,
        joined and formed in elegance.
        Steamy dance of high creation,
        giving vent to Earthly Station.

        - Raven's Wing

        Litha is one of the four solar festivals of the Wheel and is the time when the God commands the ripening and blossoming of the fields and nature. Litha is on the longest day of the year. There is traditionally much celebration for all of our blessings that have come to fruition.

        One legend says that Litha is the night that the fairy world is most active and easier to see. (Think the play A Midsummer Night's Dream.) One legend says that rubbing fern seed on your eyes at the stroke of midnight would enable you to see the fae more easily. A word of caution....do not invite fairies into your home. They are mischevious little things.

        The bonfires that are lit in ceebration of Midsummer are said to be remnants of the Druid rites to ward off evil spirits and honor the Sun.

        Now is also the time to gather your herbs. They are said to be most potent on this night. This peak in the harvesting season should be noted and these herbs marked as such for use in certain spells.

        All this being said....we are celebrating together on our Midsummer night. This makes my heart very happy. We wish to honor the God and Goddess as much as we can in the public setting we have chosen. Vision and I will be bringing a few things such as summer flowers to make a small (subtle and discreet) altar on our table. Please feel free to bring anything small that you would like to contribute.

        We look so forward to seeing everyone.

        Blessed be....Love and light...
        Shadow

      • Seaglass Vision
        Hi Trinity, Tuesday June 21, 2011 6:30 pm Dinner La Parrilla Mexican Restaurant 4771 Montgomery Highway Dothan, AL 36303-1659 (334) 671-7090 Casual dress,
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 1, 2011
          Hi Trinity,

          Tuesday June 21, 2011
          6:30 pm
          Dinner
          La Parrilla Mexican Restaurant
          4771 Montgomery Highway
          Dothan, AL 36303-1659
          (334) 671-7090
          Casual dress, everyone pays for their own meal as we celebrate the summer solstice.

          Hope to see you there!

          Blessed be,

          Vision



          --- In silverliningcircle@yahoogroups.com, Trinity Songbird <TrinitySbrd369@...> wrote:
          >
          > when and where is the Litha gathering? I would love to come
          >  
          > Senebty
          > TRINITY
          >
          > " If you take the Christian Bible and put it out into the rain, wind and snow,
          > it will soon dissolve. Our religion IS the rain, wind and snow."---as said to an
          > herbalist by a Native American medicine woman.
          > "What other people think of me is none of my business." unknown
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Silver Shadow <silvershadow3x@...>
          > To: silverliningcircle@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Wed, June 1, 2011 6:31:36 AM
          > Subject: [silverliningcircle] Litha
          >
          >  
          > Hello all :)
          >
          > The Wheel of the the Year is slowly turning. I am sure everyone has noticed the
          > dramtic increase in the temp outside! Midsummer is upon us as our Summer
          > Solstice and otherwise known as Litha or the Feast of the Fairy.
          >
          > Midsummer is consummation.
          > Peak of life the elevation,
          > Between the fires and the vales,
          > God and Goddess happy sails.
          > Fire and water in a balance,
          > joined and formed in elegance.
          > Steamy dance of high creation,
          > giving vent to Earthly Station.
          >
          > - Raven's Wing
          >
          > Litha is one of the four solar festivals of the Wheel and is the time when the
          > God commands the ripening and blossoming of the fields and nature. Litha is on
          > the longest day of the year. There is traditionally much celebration for all of
          > our blessings that have come to fruition.
          >
          >
          > One legend says that Litha is the night that the fairy world is most active and
          > easier to see. (Think the play A Midsummer Night's Dream.) One legend says that
          > rubbing fern seed on your eyes at the stroke of midnight would enable you to see
          > the fae more easily. A word of caution....do not invite fairies into your home.
          > They are mischevious little things.
          >
          >
          > The bonfires that are lit in ceebration of Midsummer are said to be remnants of
          > the Druid rites to ward off evil spirits and honor the Sun.
          >
          > Now is also the time to gather your herbs. They are said to be most potent on
          > this night. This peak in the harvesting season should be noted and these herbs
          > marked as such for use in certain spells.
          >
          > All this being said....we are celebrating together on our Midsummer night. This
          > makes my heart very happy. We wish to honor the God and Goddess as much as we
          > can in the public setting we have chosen. Vision and I will be bringing a few
          > things such as summer flowers to make a small (subtle and discreet) altar on our
          > table. Please feel free to bring anything small that you would like to
          > contribute.
          >
          >
          > We look so forward to seeing everyone.
          >
          > Blessed be....Love and light...
          > Shadow
          >
        • Trinity Songbird
          this is just some stuff about the month of june and litha/summer solstice from a newsletter i do each month from my coven/group i am a memebr of. i thought i
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 4, 2011
            this is just some stuff about the month of june and litha/summer solstice from a newsletter i do each month from my coven/group i am a memebr of. i thought i would share it with you guys. knowledge is everyting!
             

            Summer Solstice

            The longest day of the year and beginning of summer. It is also known as Litha, Midsummer. The sun is at it’s Highest.  Goddess manifests as Mother Earth and the God as the Sun King. the Sun God has reached the moment of his greatest strength. Seated on his greenwood throne, he is also lord of the forests, and his face is seen in church architecture peering from countless foliate masks. Midsummer Night's Eve is also special for adherents of the Faerie faith. Some deities associated with Midsummer are: Aten (Egypt): This god was at one point an aspect of Ra, but rather than being depicted as an anthropomorphic being (like most of the other ancient Egyptian gods), Aten was represented by the disc of the sun, with rays of light emanating outward; Apollo (Greek): The son of Zeus by Leto, Apollo was a multi-faceted god. In addition to being the god of the sun, he also presided over music, medicine and healing. He was at one point identified with Helios. As worship of him spread throughout the Roman empire into the British Isles, he took on many of the aspects of the Celtic deities, and was seen as a god of the sun and of healing; Lugh (Celtic): Similar to the Roman god Mercury, Lugh was known as a god of both skill and the distribution of talent. He is sometimes associated with midsummer because of his role as a harvest god, and during the summer solstice the crops are flourishing, waiting to be plucked from the ground at Lughnasadh; Sunna or Sol (Germanic): Little is known about this Norse goddess of the sun, but she appears in the poetic eddas as the sister of the moon god; Sulis Minerva (Celtic, Roman): When the Romans occupied the British Isles, they took the aspects of the Celtic sun goddess, Sulis, and blended her with their own goddess of wisdom, Minerva. The resulting combination was Sulis Minerva, who watched over the hot springs and sacred waters in the town of Bath; Horus (Egyptian): Horus was one of the solar deities of the ancient Egyptians. He rose and set every day, and is often associated with Nut, the sky god. Horus later became connected with another sun god, Ra; and of course Ra was the almost universally-worshipped king of the gods and all-father of creation. A sun god, he was said to command the chariot that rode across the sky during the day. A king, he was the patron of the pharaoh. Ra is the most central god of the Egyptian pantheon.

             

             

            On Sunday, June 25, 1876 General George Armstrong Custer led five companies of The Seventh Cavalry into the valley of unspeakable death and one of the most tragic historical dramas of our time. More than two hundred and sixty soldiers were killed and even though four thousand brave Sioux and Cheyenne warriors experienced a glorious victory, the Battle of The Little Bighorn marked a tragic last stand for them as well. It is hoped that the passage of one hundred and twenty five years will grant the author a fair perspective of this battle as told from both points of view.

            By 1876 most of the Plains Indians had been forced into government Reservations due to the discovery of gold in the Black Hills. The resulting flood of miners and settlers expanded settlement into this sacred region which, in 1868, The Treaty of Fort Laramie had designated exclusively for the Indians. Many Sioux and Cheyenne, too tired to fight for their rights, had already begun the transition to the white man’s world. Still, some rebel bands resisted, unable to relinquish the traditions of their proud ancestors.

             

            The “Indian matter” was to be settled permanently by three columns of federal troops led by experienced Civil War veterans. These included General George Crook, General Alfred Terry and Colonel John Gibbon whose instructions were to consider all Indians roaming across the countryside, which had been theirs in the first place, hostile. The bloody clash of forces at The Little Bighorn River in eastern Montana marked the culmination of the 400 year long Indian wars.

            At the age of 25, Custer became the youngest Brigadier General in American history. Brash, brave and bound for glory, he had made a spectacular name for himself during the Civil War. In 1863 he led the cavalry in Gettysburg and fought in General Sheridan’s Shenandoah Valley campaign. For more than ten years afterwards he fought in the ongoing war against the Indians, earning even their respect as the brave soldier they called “yellowhair.” But at the Little Bighorn River on that fateful Sunday in June, Custer faced a formidable adversary in the renowned head of the Lakota nation, Chief Crazy Horse.

             

            The legendary warrior was determined to preserve his people’s traditional way of life. It was he who organized the first eight hundred warriors in a camp near the Rosebud River, just east of the Little Bighorn. Here his war cries were answered as warriors grabbed their horses and their weapons to defend their homes and their families against the encroaching soldiers. In a war bonnet so full that it swept the ground in its majesty, he charged valiantly against the blue coats, screaming to his men above the blaring bugle and thunderous roar of horse’s hooves that “today was a good day to die.”

             

            The numbers grew to an overwhelming four thousand. They included the Northern Cheyenne, allied to Crazy Horse through his first marriage to a Cheyenne woman, the eastern Hunkpapa Sioux nation and the spiritual guidance of its holy leader, Sitting Bull, who at the time was 40 years old and too old for battle. During a Sun Dance, a few nights before the final bloody clash, Sitting Bull offered prayers to The Great Spirit and slashed his arms one hundred times as a sign of sacrifice. He had a vision of many blue-coats “falling like grasshoppers” into the Indian camp. It was a prophesy that would soon fulfill itself.

             

            Unbeknownst to Custer, on the 17th of June, General George Crook had barely escaped with his life after a bloody skirmish with Chief Crazy Horse at the mouth of the nearby Rosebud River. Although outnumbered, Crazy Horse ferociously defended his land for six hours and Crook and his regiment were forced to retreat. Had Custer known about this, he would have at least had an idea of how desperate the Plains Indians were. He might have saved his own life and those of his men as well as altered the course of history.

             

            On the afternoon of the 25th, Custer’s scouts reported an immense Indian camp some 15 miles away. The haze from the heat of the day and the dust from the hooves of thousands of war ponies obscured the village from view. Custer could see nothing from the high point of the divide that separated the Rosebud and Little Bighorn rivers, known as the Crow’s Nest. Familiar with the terrain, many Indians lay hidden from view in the deep ravines scattered across the valley. Custer might have expected to be outnumbered, but it is unlikely that he could have calculated the overwhelming numerical superiority of the Indians. He divided his regiment of 647 men into three battalions, one under Major Reno, one under Captain Frederick Benteen and he led the third himself in a direct charge.

             

            Custer first rushed the Indian encampment and then made a stand on a nearby ridge where his entire batallion was annihilated. Many of the survivors of the other two battalions, including Reno and Benteen who never reinforced Custer's charge, never recovered from the devastating trauma of that day. The Indians’ victory was the beginning of their end for soon they would be forced to comply completely to the white man’s ways. Chief Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull remained defiant towards American military power to the end of their lives and both men died violently; Crazy Horse by a soldier’s bayonet and Sitting Bull by a bullet in the head fired by one of his own people. Neither chief lived to see the ultimate humiliation at Wounded Knee and the devastating loss of their rich heritage forever.

             

            The staggering losses still linger in the memory of The Seventh Cavalry to this day. A taste for revenge and an unwillingness to consider the Indians’ position forbade a fair appraisal of what had happened on that Sunday in 1876 so close to America’s centennial celebration. It is said that ghosts still linger, as if trapped in the ether of the air, at the site of the battlefield in southeastern Montana where white markers denote the spot where each dead soldier was found. For the Indian dead there are no such markers, but the spirit of their battle cries resounds forever across the stark and lonely countryside. There remains to this day the bitter dreams of a proud, forgotten people and an antagonism towards the government that at the very least betrayed them with lies and false promises.

             

             
             

            Runic Writing

            MIDYEAR/JUNE


            Midyear 8, Lindisfarne Day: On this day in the year 1043 Runic Era (793 CE) three Viking ships raided the Isle of Lindisfarne, officially opening what is the Viking Age. Toast these brave warriors who began the noble resistance of the alien invasion of the Northlands and sought rightful revenge for the slaughter of the Saxons by Charlamange.

            Midyear 9, Day of Remembrance for Sigurd the Volsung: He is the model Germanic hero. His wooing of the Valkyrie Brynhild, the winning of the treasure of the Nibelungs, and the constant theme of Odinic initiation that weaves itself throughout his story are priceless parts of our Asatru heritage, that provide endless material for contemplation and inspiration for action.

            Midyear 19, Asatru Alliance Founding Day: On this date 2238 R.E. seven Kindreds of the former Asatru Free Assembly joined together by ratifying a set of By Laws to preserve and continue to promote the cause of the AFA and Asatru in Vinland. On this day reflect on just what YOU can do to preserve our Folk Ways.

            Midyear 21, Midsummer: This is the longest day and the shortest night of the year: Now Sunna begins its ling decline, sliding into the darkness which will culminate six months from now at Yule. Identifying the sun with the brightness of Baldur, we celebrate in honor of both. Hold blot to Baldur and High Feast. This was the traditional time for holding the AlThing in ancient times.

             

              RECIPE

             

            SUMMER SANGRIA  ( serves 12)

             

            8 cups dry white wine                                          3 tablespoons sugar

            1 cup apple juice                                                  1 cup sliced fresh raspberries ( frozen can                                                                                              

            ¼ cup freshly squeezed lime juice                       substituted)

            1/3 cup grand marnier                                          1 cup sliced fresh strawberries

            2 oranges thinly sliced for garnish                       1 lemon thinly, sliced for garnish

            1 lime, thinly sliced for garnish

             

            Mix the wine, apple juice,  lime juice, Grand Marnier, sugar, raspberries, and strawberries  in a large pitcher.  Garnish with the orange, lemon, and lime slices. Add ice cubes and stir to chill.

             

             

             

            MONTHLY MOON PHASES

             

            01  9  15  23  27

            . The Duir-Oak moon is the seventh tree in the Celtic Tree Calendar. The oak was very sacred to both Druids and Romans. It is the tree of Zeus, Jupiter, Hercules, The Dagda, Odin, Thor and all other thunder gods. It is also sacred to Blodeuwedd. The acorn may be worn as a symbol of these deities. The oak bark may be dried and ground and used as incense to honor these deities. The wood used for the Summer Solstice fires is always traditionally oak. The fires at Vesta in Rome were always oak as well as "Need Fires". Doors were traditionally made of oak because it is the strongest wood. Duir is the Beth-Luis-Nion word for door. Mid-summer is the flowering season for oak. It is the tree of endurance and triumph. Like ash it is said to "court the lightening flash". It is believed its roots run deep into the underground and its branches rise high into the air making it emblematic of the God/desses whose law rules both in Heaven and the Underworld. Originally, Poseidon the ash-god and Zeus the oak-god both were armed with thunderbolts. But when Acheans humbled the Aeolians, Poseidon' s thunderbolts were converted into a trident. Zeus was left with sole rights to the thunderbolts.    The month which takes its name from Jupiter the oak-god, begins on June 10th and ends on July 7th. Midway comes St. John’s day or mid-summers day, the day the oak-king was traditionally sacrificed. The Celtic year was divided into two halves, with the second half beginning in July; apparently after a seven day wake or funeral feast in the oak-king' s honor. Oak kings such as Janus and Hercules were door keepers. They were also closely identified with the Celtic god Llyr, Lludd or Nudd. Also associated here is the White Goddess Cardea, the goddess of hinges. She was the hinge on which the year swung. She was also the ruler of the four winds. She was known as "she who looks both back and forward". The White Goddess is also associated with the mill. The celestial mill about which the universe turned. Another name for the White Goddess of the mill is Artemis Calliste ("Most Beautiful"). She was served by the she-bears. The she-bears can be seen in the constellations "The Great She-Bear" and "Little She-Bear" who turn the celestial mill in the sky.   To keep yourself surrounded with good luck, tie two small equal length oak branches together with a piece of red yarn to represent keeping yourself in perfect balance. Never cut an oak with mistletoe growing on it. These are particularly sacred trees and are best served by doing ritual around them.    As for the Rose Moon, roses are a symbol of love and beauty and triumph over evil and adversaries. Roses are sacred to goddesses and gods of love, such as the Goddesses Aphrodite and Venus and Gods Bacchus and Cupid. Sappho Legendary lesbian poet of ancient Greece called the Rose "The Queen of Flowers". The rose represents all aspects of the Goddess and her ability to love and nurture and see the beauty in all things. The rose represents the love the Goddess has for her children. The rose may be used to honor the Goddess, or by the High Priestess when Drawing Down the Moon. The rose is also a symbol of union and is used often in hand-fasting. Roses are also a symbol of secrecy. A rose would be suspended from the ceiling of a meeting space or confidence, that none would break the trust. In meditation one anoints the Heart Chakra with rose oil to learn of the manifestation of love and learning how to keep perfect balance when giving and receiving love for and from all humanity. Roses bring the ability to balance giving and do so selflessly and to take joy in it instead of expecting something in return.

             

            Gemini (May 21 to June 20 You may feel as if someone has emptied the whole bucket over you this month. Information and ideas can just overwhelm you. There are work or job opportunities in the making and these can solve your financial issues and help to deal with the issues you have with others or partners in your life. Intuitively you will get some very creative insights and find the right people to answer your needs.

            He is bored easily and feels uncomfortable in an enclosed environment. Naturally bright and alert, he uses a good vocabulary and enjoys learning for its own sake.  He has a retentive memory for facts and languages. He may skim the surface of whatever is being studied but he covers a wide territory. Easy talker, he sometimes stretches the truth to make a good story. He prefers to do more than one thing at a time, but he needs to learn to finish what he stars.

            CRAWFISH  May 22 - Jun 21 Crawfish is a water sign. If you work in an office, you're always
            hanging around the water cooler. Crawfish prefer the beach to the mountains, the pool to the golf course, the bathtub to the living room. You tend not to be particularly attractive physically, but you have
            very, very good hands.

            =========================================================================

            Cancer (June 21 to July 22 Tension exists in work or business. Look to others either partners, friends or networks to assist you to see a better way. Accepting responsibilities can lead to potentially good connections down the road that can really pay off for you. Long term prospects now begin to look good as the clouds lift. Close family members can lead you to erroneous conclusions. Don't be mislead.

            He listens to the emotions and feelings of himself and others. He often alternates between introversion and extroversion. He has a strong appreciation for the earth and its natural resources. He is protective of its personal security and also any persons who are included in its inner circle. He is a loyal and devoted lover and parent. He will work to make his living environment cozy, but he must learn to stabilize his emotions

            COLLARDS  Jun 22- Jul 23   Collards have a genius for communication. They love to get in the
            "melting pot" of life and share their essence with the essences of  those around them. Collards make good social workers, psychologists, and baseball managers. As far as your personal life goes, if you are
            Collards, stay away from Moon Pies. It just won't work. Save yourself a lot of headaches.


             
            Senebty
            TRINITY
             
            " If you take the Christian Bible and put it out into the rain, wind and snow, it will soon dissolve. Our religion IS the rain, wind and snow."---as said to an herbalist by a Native American medicine woman.
            "What other people think of me is none of my business." unknown



            From: Seaglass Vision <seaglassvision@...>
            To: silverliningcircle@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wed, June 1, 2011 2:26:12 PM
            Subject: [silverliningcircle] Re: Litha

             

            Hi Trinity,

            Tuesday June 21, 2011
            6:30 pm
            Dinner
            La Parrilla Mexican Restaurant
            4771 Montgomery Highway
            Dothan, AL 36303-1659
            (334) 671-7090
            Casual dress, everyone pays for their own meal as we celebrate the summer solstice.

            Hope to see you there!

            Blessed be,

            Vision

            --- In silverliningcircle@yahoogroups.com, Trinity Songbird <TrinitySbrd369@...> wrote:
            >
            > when and where is the Litha gathering? I would love to come
            >  
            > Senebty
            > TRINITY
            >
            > " If you take the Christian Bible and put it out into the rain, wind and snow,
            > it will soon dissolve. Our religion IS the rain, wind and snow."---as said to an
            > herbalist by a Native American medicine woman.
            > "What other people think of me is none of my business." unknown
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Silver Shadow <silvershadow3x@...>
            > To: silverliningcircle@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Wed, June 1, 2011 6:31:36 AM
            > Subject: [silverliningcircle] Litha
            >
            >  
            > Hello all :)
            >
            > The Wheel of the the Year is slowly turning. I am sure everyone has noticed the
            > dramtic increase in the temp outside! Midsummer is upon us as our Summer
            > Solstice and otherwise known as Litha or the Feast of the Fairy.
            >
            > Midsummer is consummation.
            > Peak of life the elevation,
            > Between the fires and the vales,
            > God and Goddess happy sails.
            > Fire and water in a balance,
            > joined and formed in elegance.
            > Steamy dance of high creation,
            > giving vent to Earthly Station.
            >
            > - Raven's Wing
            >
            > Litha is one of the four solar festivals of the Wheel and is the time when the
            > God commands the ripening and blossoming of the fields and nature. Litha is on
            > the longest day of the year. There is traditionally much celebration for all of
            > our blessings that have come to fruition.
            >
            >
            > One legend says that Litha is the night that the fairy world is most active and
            > easier to see. (Think the play A Midsummer Night's Dream.) One legend says that
            > rubbing fern seed on your eyes at the stroke of midnight would enable you to see
            > the fae more easily. A word of caution....do not invite fairies into your home.
            > They are mischevious little things.
            >
            >
            > The bonfires that are lit in ceebration of Midsummer are said to be remnants of
            > the Druid rites to ward off evil spirits and honor the Sun.
            >
            > Now is also the time to gather your herbs. They are said to be most potent on
            > this night. This peak in the harvesting season should be noted and these herbs
            > marked as such for use in certain spells.
            >
            > All this being said....we are celebrating together on our Midsummer night. This
            > makes my heart very happy. We wish to honor the God and Goddess as much as we
            > can in the public setting we have chosen. Vision and I will be bringing a few
            > things such as summer flowers to make a small (subtle and discreet) altar on our
            > table. Please feel free to bring anything small that you would like to
            > contribute.
            >
            >
            > We look so forward to seeing everyone.
            >
            > Blessed be....Love and light...
            > Shadow
            >

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