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[silk] Hogwarts Headaches

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  • Udhay Shankar N
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2003/10/31/wpott31.xml&sSheet=/news/2003/10/31/ixworld.html Telegraph | News | Hogwarts head is new curse
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 30, 2003
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      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2003/10/31/wpott31.xml&sSheet=/news/2003/10/31/ixworld.html

      Telegraph | News | Hogwarts head is new curse of Potter fans
      By Marcus Warren in New York
      (Filed: 31/10/2003)

      Young American fans of Harry Potter have suffered "Hogwarts headaches"
      caused by the physical effort of reading the latest - and heaviest - of the
      books about the adolescent wizard.

      The condition was the direct result of ploughing through Harry Potter and
      the Order of the Phoenix, said the doctor who diagnosed the complaint. The
      book's US edition runs to 870 pages and weighs nearly 3lb.

      "The obvious cure - taking a break from reading - was rejected by two of
      the three patients," Dr Howard Bennett wrote in a letter to the New England
      Journal of Medicine.

      The children chose to take a painkiller instead. The journal, in its issue
      published yesterday, warned of more "misery for Muggles".

      Dr Bennett forecast "an epidemic" of the problem if future books in the
      Harry Potter series continued the trend of being longer and weighing more
      than their predecessor.

      The outbreak of headaches coincided with the publication this summer of the
      fifth volume in the saga and the frenzied efforts of fans to read it, often
      at one sitting.

      The sufferers diagnosed by Dr Bennett at his Washington practice complained
      of two to three days of dull headache and were "free of any symptoms
      suggesting an underlying infectious or neurological cause," he wrote.

      "I went through the standard history and physical exam but I couldn't
      figure it out," Dr Bennett said of the first patient.

      "The headaches were bothering her, so I said, 'Let's go through your day.'
      Then I found out."

      He was soon on the lookout for other cases. "The third child I could
      diagnose over the phone," he told The Telegraph.

      His letter follows a tradition of similar letters to the journal alerting
      the world to "frisbee finger", "Space Invader wrist" and "Nintendo tendonitis".

      J K Rowling's portrayal of magic, spells, curses and monsters was not to
      blame for the children's woes, said Dr Bennett, who added that he and his
      two children were Harry Potter fans.

      "If children can take a break from time to time, read at a desk and with
      good light, that certainly would help," he advised parents worried for
      their sons' and daughters' health.

      "All the children who suffered headaches are fine now. There have been no
      recurrences or relapses."


      --
      ((Udhay Shankar N)) ((udhay @ pobox.com)) ((www.digeratus.com))
    • sastry
      The last time I heard something so ridiculous and pointless was from the British Medical Journal in the 80s when cellular phones were just beginning to appear.
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 31, 2003
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        The last time I heard something so ridiculous and pointless was from the
        British Medical Journal in the 80s when cellular phones were just beginning
        to appear.

        Some joker described what he called was "Yuppie ear" caused by poking a
        cellular phone antenna through an eardrum while trying to speak while driving.

        Prior to that the record for ridiculousness was "hibiscrubus muckoshirtii"
        the condition of getting a pink spray of the antiseptic "Hibiscrub" mucking
        up your clean shirt because the congealed Hibiscrub on the pump nozzle caused
        the spray to hit your shirt rather than your outstretched hand.

        On Friday 31 October 2003 08:12, you wrote:
        > http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2003/10/31/wpott31.xml
        >&sSheet=/news/2003/10/31/ixworld.html
        >
        > Telegraph | News | Hogwarts head is new curse of Potter fans
        > By Marcus Warren in New York
        > (Filed: 31/10/2003)
        >
        > Young American fans of Harry Potter have suffered "Hogwarts headaches"
        > caused by the physical effort of reading the latest - and heaviest - of the
        > books about the adolescent wizard.
        >
        > The condition was the direct result of ploughing through Harry Potter and
        > the Order of the Phoenix, said the doctor who diagnosed the complaint. The
        > book's US edition runs to 870 pages and weighs nearly 3lb.
        >
        > "The obvious cure - taking a break from reading - was rejected by two of
        > the three patients," Dr Howard Bennett wrote in a letter to the New England
        > Journal of Medicine.
        >
        > The children chose to take a painkiller instead. The journal, in its issue
        > published yesterday, warned of more "misery for Muggles".
        >
        > Dr Bennett forecast "an epidemic" of the problem if future books in the
        > Harry Potter series continued the trend of being longer and weighing more
        > than their predecessor.
        >
        > The outbreak of headaches coincided with the publication this summer of the
        > fifth volume in the saga and the frenzied efforts of fans to read it, often
        > at one sitting.
        >
        > The sufferers diagnosed by Dr Bennett at his Washington practice complained
        > of two to three days of dull headache and were "free of any symptoms
        > suggesting an underlying infectious or neurological cause," he wrote.
        >
        > "I went through the standard history and physical exam but I couldn't
        > figure it out," Dr Bennett said of the first patient.
        >
        > "The headaches were bothering her, so I said, 'Let's go through your day.'
        > Then I found out."
        >
        > He was soon on the lookout for other cases. "The third child I could
        > diagnose over the phone," he told The Telegraph.
        >
        > His letter follows a tradition of similar letters to the journal alerting
        > the world to "frisbee finger", "Space Invader wrist" and "Nintendo
        > tendonitis".
        >
        > J K Rowling's portrayal of magic, spells, curses and monsters was not to
        > blame for the children's woes, said Dr Bennett, who added that he and his
        > two children were Harry Potter fans.
        >
        > "If children can take a break from time to time, read at a desk and with
        > good light, that certainly would help," he advised parents worried for
        > their sons' and daughters' health.
        >
        > "All the children who suffered headaches are fine now. There have been no
        > recurrences or relapses."
      • Vishal Doshi
        ... http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2003/10/31/wpott31.xml ... Sounds like a winner; of next years Ig Nobel that is. Someone should notify
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 31, 2003
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          > On Friday 31 October 2003 08:12, you wrote:
          >>
          http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2003/10/31/wpott31.xml
          >> &sSheet=/news/2003/10/31/ixworld.html
          >>
          >> Telegraph | News | Hogwarts head is new curse of Potter fans
          >> By Marcus Warren in New York
          >> (Filed: 31/10/2003)
          >>
          >> Young American fans of Harry Potter have suffered "Hogwarts
          >> headaches" caused by the physical effort of reading the latest - and
          >> heaviest - of the books about the adolescent wizard.
          >>

          Sounds like a winner; of next years Ig Nobel that is. Someone should notify
          the Annals of Improbable Research!


          Vishal.
        • Sudhakar Chandra
          ... Thats all fine and dandy. Does your erudite knowlede of the the stupidities of the BMJ or the intellectual shortcomings of the common people (those
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 31, 2003
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            On 10/31/03 06:24, sastry wrote:
            > The last time I heard something so ridiculous and pointless was from the
            > British Medical Journal in the 80s when cellular phones were just beginning
            > to appear.

            Thats all fine and dandy. Does your erudite knowlede of the the
            stupidities of the BMJ or the intellectual shortcomings of the common
            people (those sheep!) give you the license not to edit the post that you
            are quoting?

            <snip>

            > On Friday 31 October 2003 08:12, you wrote:
            >
            >>http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2003/10/31/wpott31.xml
            >>&sSheet=/news/2003/10/31/ixworld.html

            <snip offending portions>

            Thaths
            --
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            Lisa: Dad! This is a documentary on the homeless.
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          • sastry
            On Friday 31 October 2003 22:02, you wrote: Does your erudite knowlede of the the ... Apparently not. Why do you ask?
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 31, 2003
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              On Friday 31 October 2003 22:02, you wrote:
              Does your erudite knowlede of the the
              > stupidities of the BMJ or the intellectual shortcomings of the common
              > people (those sheep!) give you the license not to edit the post that you
              > are quoting?
              >

              Apparently not.

              Why do you ask?
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