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Re: [sig] Beets & red eggs

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  • Jenna Mitelman
    Ilijana, To answer at least some of your questions, I usually just cook my eggs with the dying materials (onion skins, cabbage, etc.), although that makes it a
    Message 1 of 27 , Apr 5 5:10 PM
      Ilijana,

      To answer at least some of your questions, I usually just cook my eggs
      with the dying materials (onion skins, cabbage, etc.), although that
      makes it a bit more difficult to control how strongly colored they
      get. But I find the dye goes on better that way, somehow - and it
      saves me a lot of time!
      And being a first generation Russian, I always add salt to my eggs, as
      well, even while dying them - it does keep them from cracking, since
      it increases the boiling temperature slightly, and allows you to
      achieve the same boiling with smaller bubbles, and thus less cracking.
      And it's never affected the dyes for me.

      ~Aryenne

      On Apr 5, 2005 2:39 PM, Ilijana Krakowska <ilijanakrakowska@...> wrote:
      > I'd be interested to know what happens when you start with uncooked farm eggs and cook them in the dyebath, rather than in plain salted water.
      >
      > Do you salt your water when you cook the eggs? My father (1st-generation Polish-American) said it keeps the eggs from cracking.

      ***********************************************
      Jenna Mitelman

      (612) 678-5678 (Day)
      (612) 872-0272 (Eve)
      (763) 234-1816 (Cell)

      Jenna.Mitelman@...
    • Jenna Mitelman
      Kseniia, I ve never tried this myself, but I ve been told by some acquaintances who dye fabric that onion skins definitely do work for that (although you d
      Message 2 of 27 , Apr 5 5:13 PM
        Kseniia,

        I've never tried this myself, but I've been told by some acquaintances
        who dye fabric that onion skins definitely do work for that (although
        you'd need a lot of them), and I think (although I'm not certain on
        this part) that the modant they use is alum.

        ~Aryenne

        On Apr 5, 2005 6:02 PM, Kseniia Smolnianina <kseniia@...> wrote:
        >
        > On a side note, can you use onion skins to dye fabric? If so, how
        > colorfast is it? What mordant would you use?

        ***********************************************
        Jenna Mitelman

        (612) 678-5678 (Day)
        (612) 872-0272 (Eve)
        (763) 234-1816 (Cell)

        Jenna.Mitelman@...
      • Susan Koziel
        ... No just experimenting. I have used the onion skins with great results. I ve found that if you time the yellow onion skins you can get anywhere from a pale
        Message 3 of 27 , Apr 5 6:54 PM
          :)
          No just experimenting.
          I have used the onion skins with great results.
          I've found that if you time the yellow onion skins you
          can get anywhere from a pale yellow to a rich gold or
          brown colour. You also don't need to boil them.
          -Kataryna

          --- Jenna Mitelman <jenna.mitelman@...> wrote:
          >
          > Kataryna,
          >
          > If your goal is to get a red color (as opposed to
          > just experimenting,
          > which is great in and of itself!), then boiling
          > things with red onion
          > skins works *wonderfully* and gives an amazing deep
          > rich mahogany red.
          > And no alcohol or waiting time is necessary.
          > Yellow onion skins work pretty well, too.
          > (White onions will give you a yellow-orange color,
          > so be careful when
          > picking them out).
          >
          > ~Aryenne
          >
          > ***********************************************
          > Jenna Mitelman
          >
          > (612) 678-5678 (Day)
          > (612) 872-0272 (Eve)
          > (763) 234-1816 (Cell)
          >
          > Jenna.Mitelman@...
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Susan Koziel
          Hi, I haven t tried boiling them at all in the beet juice, but I suspect that it might not work, since the alcohol would cook off... but it s worth a try. The
          Message 4 of 27 , Apr 5 7:01 PM
            Hi,
            I haven't tried boiling them at all in the beet
            juice, but I suspect that it might not work, since the
            alcohol would cook off... but it's worth a try. The
            pickled beet juice had salt in it. ;)

            Also the reason your commercial eggs don't dye well is
            that they have been washed with soap and bleach which
            cleans them of salmonella (this is required by law for
            eggs that are sold to stores - at least in Canada).
            The only way to get unbleached eggs is to ask your
            local farmer for eggs that haven't been washed. Around
            here most of the egg farmers are more then happy to
            sell a dozen unwashed eggs with out question... but
            I'm fortunate to live in Ukrainian community so
            writing eggs is commonplace, and expected all year
            round. On the down side it means I actually have to
            pay for the pill bottles from the drug store that I
            used to get for free in the city. (I use them for
            packing eggs I've done)

            -Kataryna

            --- Ilijana Krakowska <ilijanakrakowska@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > This was really fascinating!
            >
            > I'd be interested to know what happens when you
            > start with uncooked farm eggs and cook them in the
            > dyebath, rather than in plain salted water.
            >
            > Do you salt your water when you cook the eggs? My
            > father (1st-generation Polish-American) said it
            > keeps the eggs from cracking.
            >
            > I'm also wondering if the egg industry might apply
            > some type of sealant to the shells, as I have had
            > trouble coloring some of them with regular
            > commercial egg dye.
            >
            > Ilijana Krakowska
            >
            > Susan Koziel <kataryna_dragonweaver@...>
            > wrote:
            > 3) Test using unbleached farm eggs (as opposed to
            > the
            > commercial eggs I bought)
            > 4) Test using unboiled eggs.
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
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          • Susan Koziel
            To get smaller bubbles you want to leave a spoon or a glass rod in the boiling water... this allows a hot spot where the bubbles congregate around and a place
            Message 5 of 27 , Apr 5 7:03 PM
              To get smaller bubbles you want to leave a spoon or a
              glass rod in the boiling water... this allows a hot
              spot where the bubbles congregate around and a place
              where they will come to the surface easier.
              That's why chemists leave their glass stir sticks
              in their beakers or use small glass beads at the
              bottom of the beaker (called boiling beads).
              -Kataryna

              --- Jenna Mitelman <jenna.mitelman@...> wrote:
              >
              > Ilijana,
              >
              > To answer at least some of your questions, I usually
              > just cook my eggs
              > with the dying materials (onion skins, cabbage,
              > etc.), although that
              > makes it a bit more difficult to control how
              > strongly colored they
              > get. But I find the dye goes on better that way,
              > somehow - and it
              > saves me a lot of time!
              > And being a first generation Russian, I always add
              > salt to my eggs, as
              > well, even while dying them - it does keep them from
              > cracking, since
              > it increases the boiling temperature slightly, and
              > allows you to
              > achieve the same boiling with smaller bubbles, and
              > thus less cracking.
              > And it's never affected the dyes for me.
              >
              > ~Aryenne
              >
              > On Apr 5, 2005 2:39 PM, Ilijana Krakowska
              > <ilijanakrakowska@...> wrote:
              > > I'd be interested to know what happens when you
              > start with uncooked farm eggs and cook them in the
              > dyebath, rather than in plain salted water.
              > >
              > > Do you salt your water when you cook the eggs? My
              > father (1st-generation Polish-American) said it
              > keeps the eggs from cracking.
              >
              > ***********************************************
              > Jenna Mitelman
              >
              > (612) 678-5678 (Day)
              > (612) 872-0272 (Eve)
              > (763) 234-1816 (Cell)
              >
              > Jenna.Mitelman@...
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Susan Koziel
              Hi. It works well and is colour fast. You do need a lot though. You can get them by asking the local produce department if you can get the discarded dry skins
              Message 6 of 27 , Apr 5 7:05 PM
                Hi.
                It works well and is colour fast. You do need a lot
                though. You can get them by asking the local produce
                department if you can get the discarded dry skins from
                them.
                -Kataryna

                --- Jenna Mitelman <jenna.mitelman@...> wrote:
                >
                > Kseniia,
                >
                > I've never tried this myself, but I've been told by
                > some acquaintances
                > who dye fabric that onion skins definitely do work
                > for that (although
                > you'd need a lot of them), and I think (although I'm
                > not certain on
                > this part) that the modant they use is alum.
                >
                > ~Aryenne
                >
                > On Apr 5, 2005 6:02 PM, Kseniia Smolnianina
                > <kseniia@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > On a side note, can you use onion skins to dye
                > fabric? If so, how
                > > colorfast is it? What mordant would you use?
                >
                > ***********************************************
                > Jenna Mitelman
                >
                > (612) 678-5678 (Day)
                > (612) 872-0272 (Eve)
                > (763) 234-1816 (Cell)
                >
                > Jenna.Mitelman@...
                >
                >
                >
                >
              • stiobhard
                i assume you are dying the eggshell and not the egg itsef. it seems the egg white (when hardboiled) would take colour better. but i havent done this. i dont
                Message 7 of 27 , Apr 5 7:10 PM
                  i assume you are dying the eggshell and not the egg itsef. it seems
                  the egg white (when hardboiled) would take colour better. but i havent
                  done this. i dont even eat eggs myself.

                  however i made this wonderful polish salad once that included
                  sauerkraut, raisins and apples and perchance some other ingredients
                  ive now forgotten. but one major part was a jar of beet juice (the
                  actual beets didnt get used in the recipe) to turn everything this
                  wonderful purply red. ande it worked quite well. actually most
                  everyone was kind of afraid to try it and its a pity because it was
                  the most wonderful mixture of sweet and sour flavours. and the beet
                  colour was most vibrant on the plate.

                  looking at your experiment im guessing the vinegar was acting with the
                  beet juice. and maybe its easier to dye cabbage than eggs but
                  anyway... i thought i should mention it. is anyone else familiar with
                  this recipe? i am not polish i just happened to run across this salad
                  at random flipping through a cookbook in the library.

                  stiobhard
                • Lente
                  several years ago one of the martha stwart magazines had a short article about dyeing eggs in natural materials like onion skins, I even seem to remember some
                  Message 8 of 27 , Apr 5 11:02 PM
                    several years ago one of the martha stwart magazines had a short article
                    about dyeing eggs in natural materials like onion skins, I even seem to
                    remember some spices being used. I don't remember much more than that.

                    Kathws

                    Sent: Tuesday, April 05, 2005 7:54 PM
                    Subject: Re: [sig] Beets & red eggs
                    > No just experimenting.
                    > I have used the onion skins with great results.
                    > I've found that if you time the yellow onion skins you
                    > can get anywhere from a pale yellow to a rich gold or
                    > brown colour. You also don't need to boil them.
                    > -Kataryna
                  • Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik
                    Greetings! ... That s it. The first generation usually knows that. Thir fathers fathers didn t. The egg cracks in the boiling water simply because of the
                    Message 9 of 27 , Apr 5 11:58 PM
                      Greetings!

                      > Do you salt your water when you cook the eggs? My father (1st-generation Polish-American) said it keeps the eggs from cracking.

                      That's it.
                      The first generation usually knows that. Thir fathers' fathers didn't.
                      The egg cracks in the boiling water simply because of the temperature difference, when you pick it out of the refridgerator. If you store your eggs in a warm place or let them warm before boiling, they are not supposed to crack. This is just a typical 20-century "common knowledge, almost folk lore".

                      Not for mere correction but to remind that this practice was not in the least period...


                      But usually we do not boil the eggs in dye. We boil the skins to get the dye, and then let the eggs lie in the liquid for a night. that's all.

                      Bye,
                      Alex.
                    • Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik
                      Greetings! ... I did it two years ago, to dye two tunics. Thick cotton. Yellow onions skins. No mordant, actually. Washed the just-sewn shirt in a detergent
                      Message 10 of 27 , Apr 6 12:14 AM
                        Greetings!

                        > On a side note, can you use onion skins to dye fabric? If so, how
                        > colorfast is it? What mordant would you use?

                        I did it two years ago, to dye two tunics. Thick cotton. Yellow onions skins. No mordant, actually. Washed the just-sewn shirt in a detergent (actually, can't say why - it was not wool...), sank it in a enamel can with the dye.

                        The thing is that first (when the onion skins are less than desired) the color of the shirt is light pink like an early sunrise on dry summer morning, then, when you add more skins (I picked the shirt out and put the dye back on the stove adding onion skins to get it darker), the yellowish shade is added. Then the color ceased being pink and became a typical color of light beer or whisky.

                        In two years I used my tunics (one was used as a viking-type shirt, the other was worn under the woolen monk's habit) heavily. One is more yellow (a SLIGHT pinky shade), the other is more pink than yellow (I coloured it the other day, and the dye was thinner). I washed them as ordinary linen, with detergent. The color faded but not greatly. Of course, no dark color is obtainable, but light beer colour just remains.


                        Bye,
                        Alex.
                      • jennifer knox
                        onion skins are very easy to dye with. start with a 15% alum mordant (this is not necessary with onion skins, however, as they are their own mordant. the alum
                        Message 11 of 27 , Apr 6 12:54 AM
                          onion skins are very easy to dye with. start with a 15% alum mordant (this is not necessary with onion skins, however, as they are their own mordant. the alum brightens it a bit, and helps get the color on linen better). then soak the onion skins for a bit and then boil them. when this is done, take the rinsed and damp fabric or yarn and keep it in the dye bath on a low heat for an hour or so. red skins make different colors on different fabrics (brown to greenish, brown ones can make anywhere from a gold to rust to brown.
                          if you need any help with dying, feel free to email me. i do quite a lot of it.
                          anya


                          Kseniia Smolnianina <kseniia@...> wrote:
                          On a side note, can you use onion skins to dye fabric? If so, how
                          colorfast is it? What mordant would you use?

                          Inquiring minds want to know...

                          --Kseniia

                          On Apr 5, 2005 1:25 PM, Jenna Mitelman <jenna.mitelman@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > Kataryna,
                          >
                          > If your goal is to get a red color (as opposed to just experimenting,
                          > which is great in and of itself!), then boiling things with red onion
                          > skins works *wonderfully* and gives an amazing deep rich mahogany red.
                          > And no alcohol or waiting time is necessary.
                          > Yellow onion skins work pretty well, too.
                          > (White onions will give you a yellow-orange color, so be careful when
                          > picking them out).

                          --
                          **********************************
                          Lady Kseniia Smolnianina
                          Barony of Three Mountains
                          Note my new e-mail address!


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                        • jennifer knox
                          the thing with cotton is that it needs to be dyed in a different way, and often with different plants than other fabrics. it takes alot more care and ph
                          Message 12 of 27 , Apr 6 12:57 AM
                            the thing with cotton is that it needs to be dyed in a different way, and often with different plants than other fabrics. it takes alot more care and ph control than wool or silk do. if you read german ive got a 2000 page book on medieval dye practices with plant discriptions, historical documentation and chemical analysis on what exactly dyes what. theres also a section on making medieval paints and coloring paper too.
                            anya


                            Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik <Posadnik@...> wrote:


                            Greetings!

                            > On a side note, can you use onion skins to dye fabric? If so, how
                            > colorfast is it? What mordant would you use?

                            I did it two years ago, to dye two tunics. Thick cotton. Yellow onions skins. No mordant, actually. Washed the just-sewn shirt in a detergent (actually, can't say why - it was not wool...), sank it in a enamel can with the dye.


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                          • susannah53
                            I know there was a post about grocery store eggs, but since I get my messages in digest form, and deleted them, I can t find it now! Anyway, I ve always washed
                            Message 13 of 27 , Apr 6 3:09 AM
                              I know there was a post about grocery store eggs, but since I get my
                              messages in digest form, and deleted them, I can't find it now!
                              Anyway, I've always washed eggs in a vinegar solution to clean them
                              and cut the grease that might be on the shell. I used to think that
                              this was the only reason that I washed them, not realizing that the
                              vinegar etches the shell a bit, and makes it easier to accept the dye.
                              That's why you put vinegar in dye for coloring eggs too. I imagine
                              that the "Easter egg dye" that says "doesn't need vinegar" on the
                              packet has citric acid or something in it, that does the same thing.
                              The commercial pysanky dyes all call for addition of vinegar as you
                              mix up the dye. The orange doesn't, as this color is used mainly as a
                              "wash" when one changes color schemes. As an orange dye it is not
                              very satisfactory. I am totally not an expert, especially when it
                              comes to natural dyes from plant and food stuffs. Though I HAVE been
                              trying to write pysanky using traditional tools, this doesn't extend
                              to my dyes; they're exclusively from the Ukrainian Gift Shop and Surma!

                              Susannah
                            • Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik
                              Greetings! ... Thanks, but - alas, I have no dictionaries to read a specialized text in German. I used to read about fabric dyeing at Stefan s Florilegium. As
                              Message 14 of 27 , Apr 6 3:32 AM
                                Greetings!
                                > the thing with cotton is that it needs to be dyed in a different way, and often with different plants than other fabrics. it takes alot more care and ph control than wool or silk do. if you read german ive got a 2000 page book on medieval dye practices with plant discriptions, historical documentation and chemical analysis on what exactly dyes what. theres also a section on making medieval paints and coloring paper too.
                                > anya
                                Thanks, but -
                                alas, I have no dictionaries to read a specialized text in German.

                                I used to read about fabric dyeing at Stefan's Florilegium. As I seldom wear bright fabrics and my persona is South Siberia-East Europe-bound, I have no need to dye linen. My overclothes are made of cotton or silk, while linen is great as it is, undyed, in underwear and shirts. Say, Persian outfit usually requires a white shirt.

                                But thanks, anyway.
                              • Kseniia Smolnianina
                                Thanks so much, Anya and everyone! I m off to Copenhagen and France for 12 days, but when I return I may have more questions. Dying is something I keep
                                Message 15 of 27 , Apr 6 5:20 AM
                                  Thanks so much, Anya and everyone! I'm off to Copenhagen and France
                                  for 12 days, but when I return I may have more questions. Dying is
                                  something I keep meaning to get into...

                                  --Kseniia

                                  On Apr 6, 2005 12:54 AM, jennifer knox <jeniferknox@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > if you need any help with dying, feel free to email me. i do quite a lot of it.
                                  > anya
                                  >


                                  --
                                  **********************************
                                  Lady Kseniia Smolnianina
                                  Barony of Three Mountains
                                  Note my new e-mail address!
                                • Jadwiga Zajaczkowa / Jenne Heise
                                  ... I ve wondered about that. If you were usually dyeing *cloth*, which generally involves simmering the cloth in the dyepot, would you, when you came to dye
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Apr 6 9:15 AM
                                    > But usually we do not boil the eggs in dye. We boil the skins to get the dye, and then let the eggs lie in the liquid for a night. that's all.

                                    I've wondered about that. If you were usually dyeing *cloth*, which
                                    generally involves simmering the cloth in the dyepot, would you, when
                                    you came to dye eggs, do it with heat or without? You get different
                                    colors, for instance, if you boil your eggs with the onion skins, than
                                    if you soak the eggs in boiled-onion-skin liquid.

                                    --
                                    -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@...
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                                    Vimes: "I think I may let people upset themselves."
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                                  • Susan Koziel
                                    I always thought it would make sense to boil the eggs if you were using a cloth dye on them... you d just drop them in with the cloth being dyed. But if you
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Apr 6 10:41 AM
                                      I always thought it would make sense to boil the
                                      eggs if you were using a cloth dye on them... you'd
                                      just drop them in with the cloth being dyed.

                                      But if you were coming from the perspective of a
                                      painter or someone decorating eggs as a 'work of art'
                                      you'd use those materials which could mean colouring
                                      the eggs in a cold dye bath.

                                      I guess it would depend what a person had access to
                                      at the time... were they into scribal type activities?
                                      then maybe they'd use left over pigments. Or had they
                                      done some clothing dying that day... then they'd use
                                      the left over dye vat... maybe hot, maybe cold.

                                      Based on daVinci's writtings about his pigment
                                      experimentation for painting... he tried lots of
                                      things from lots of places, he even wrote if it worked
                                      well or not. My guess is that anyone else that was
                                      working on this sort of thing did the same and shared
                                      some of what they knew with their neighbours.

                                      This is why I think it's worth my time to figure out
                                      if pysanky decorations were done using a resist method
                                      (wax or paste) since the designs don't remain
                                      distinctive if you have to use a hot dying method.
                                      Basically if you can show that wax or paste resist was
                                      used in period to decorate eggs then you can, via
                                      conjecture, say that cold dye vats were used to dye
                                      things (specifically eggs).

                                      As you can tell I've thought about this way too
                                      much. :) I like the whole dye/wax process of
                                      decorating eggs, but until I find some really solid
                                      information on it's use prior to 1600's then I'll have
                                      to settle with painting, gilting, dying (with out the
                                      wax resist), enameling, and making ceramic eggs.
                                      ;)
                                      -Kataryna
                                    • Stacey Mihallik
                                      My husband s family has the tradition of pickling hard boiled eggs in pickled beet juice for Easter morning. They eat the eggs with cold polska kielbasa and
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Apr 6 11:35 AM
                                        My husband's family has the tradition of pickling hard boiled eggs in pickled beet juice for Easter morning. They eat the eggs with cold polska kielbasa and grated horseradish (sometimes mixed with grated beets). It makes the eggs the most beautiful color! However, since I don't like beets or hard boiled eggs, I really can't say how they taste. :)

                                        Basically, you boil the eggs, peel them while still hot (ouch!), and put them in a container with the pickled beets and juice. The beets help keep the eggs submerged. Stir the eggs a few times a day for three days. The color (and I assume the flavor) permeates all the way through the white.

                                        Alzbeta

                                        stiobhard <stiobhard@...> wrote:
                                        i assume you are dying the eggshell and not the egg itsef. it seems
                                        the egg white (when hardboiled) would take colour better. but i havent
                                        done this. i dont even eat eggs myself.



                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Susan Koziel
                                        Hi, Actually the vinegar is also acting as a mordant for the dyes you use with the egg. It also reacts with the calcium in the egg shell making the shell
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Apr 6 2:54 PM
                                          Hi,
                                          Actually the vinegar is also acting as a mordant for
                                          the dyes you use with the egg. It also reacts with the
                                          calcium in the egg shell making the shell softer and
                                          the pores of the egg larger. Soaking an egg in vinegar
                                          long enough will soften the shell enough that you can
                                          squeeze it into a bottle (that's how the egg in the
                                          bottle trick is done). Acetic Acid (Vinegar) has a
                                          particular affinity for the ions that are in hard
                                          water (Calcium, and Magnesium) and makes a great way
                                          to remove hard water stains off dishes, mirrors, and
                                          anything else.
                                          This is also why when you have a egg that has either
                                          sat to long in a dye bath or has been through to many
                                          dye baths you end up with dye that tends to rub off.
                                          At that point the pores of the egg are either clogged
                                          with the dye molecules or perhaps to etched away and
                                          it doesn't matter what you do to the egg you won't get
                                          good colouration unless you break down and paint the
                                          egg.
                                          Orange is not a dye that requires a vinegar mordant
                                          and that's why it works as a rinse... I have two
                                          separate pots of Orange one for dying only and one for
                                          rinsing.
                                          If you do really quick dye baths you can get through
                                          2 rounds of colours (this allows you to do touch ups).
                                          No colour, yellow, blue, green, orange, red, purple,
                                          black, bleach (2 second or less - rinse with water
                                          twice and re beach 2 seconds rinse again with water
                                          twice), yellow, blue, green, orange, red, purple,
                                          black. By the second black the black may be smudging
                                          off... so you use the second round of dyeing to do
                                          touch up work only... work with a pin to clean up
                                          lines and such & only do the colours you absolutely
                                          have to. Sometimes melting the wax off to look at the
                                          egg and then re-waxing the whole egg is the best way
                                          to find what touch ups can be done. The pin allows you
                                          to make really really fine lines on the egg and you
                                          can actually do black out lining that way if required.
                                          The reason I suggest farm eggs is because a free
                                          range chicken will produce eggs with thicker shells,
                                          these chickens aren't force feed - they run around
                                          lots and they produce tougher shells. Generally
                                          chicken farm chickens are feed and raised to produce
                                          shells that break easily - you don't want that for
                                          making easter eggs. The thinner the shell the less dye
                                          it will hold (the larger the pores get with more dye
                                          baths).
                                          As for writing with traditional tools... I only got
                                          a electric kistka in the last year or so. Prior to
                                          that I used a cast set of kistka - aside from the
                                          really fine lines I prefer the cast kistka for making
                                          my eggs. I have two kistka that my father and I made
                                          out of a bit of tin and some wood... it works almost
                                          as well as any medium sized commercial kistka, but
                                          tends to twist around if it gets too hot.
                                          -Kataryna-who's-babbling-way-way-to-much-about-eggs
                                        • Susan Koziel
                                          Hmmm that brings up a point I may have forgotten to add... Putting a boiled egg (yes I am talking of the egg shells being dyed not the egg it self) into
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Apr 6 3:09 PM
                                            Hmmm that brings up a point I may have forgotten to
                                            add... Putting a boiled egg (yes I am talking of the
                                            egg shells being dyed not the egg it self) into
                                            pickled beet juice does not result in dying of the
                                            shell. I had tried that many years earlier when I
                                            first started trying to use dyes that might have been
                                            used in period.
                                            ;)
                                            I feel I can safely say it's something about the
                                            vinegar and the alcohol... especially when I say the
                                            amount of precipatate increase in the bottom of my
                                            glass when I added the alcohol.

                                            I'm wondering if the first egg work so well because it
                                            was still warm and sitting in the pickled beet juice
                                            before the alcohol was added. The eggs added to the
                                            dye after didn't seem to absorb as much of the dye.
                                            -Kataryna


                                            --- stiobhard <stiobhard@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > i assume you are dying the eggshell and not the egg
                                            > itsef. it seems
                                            > the egg white (when hardboiled) would take colour
                                            > better. but i havent
                                            > done this. i dont even eat eggs myself.
                                            >
                                            > however i made this wonderful polish salad once that
                                            > included
                                            > sauerkraut, raisins and apples and perchance some
                                            > other ingredients
                                            > ive now forgotten. but one major part was a jar of
                                            > beet juice (the
                                            > actual beets didnt get used in the recipe) to turn
                                            > everything this
                                            > wonderful purply red. ande it worked quite well.
                                            > actually most
                                            > everyone was kind of afraid to try it and its a pity
                                            > because it was
                                            > the most wonderful mixture of sweet and sour
                                            > flavours. and the beet
                                            > colour was most vibrant on the plate.
                                            >
                                            > looking at your experiment im guessing the vinegar
                                            > was acting with the
                                            > beet juice. and maybe its easier to dye cabbage than
                                            > eggs but
                                            > anyway... i thought i should mention it. is anyone
                                            > else familiar with
                                            > this recipe? i am not polish i just happened to run
                                            > across this salad
                                            > at random flipping through a cookbook in the
                                            > library.
                                            >
                                            > stiobhard
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                          • Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik
                                            Greetings ... Never bothered about that. My great-granny and my granny used both (the former sometimes boiled the eggs with onion skins, the latter USUALLY put
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Apr 6 11:47 PM
                                              Greetings

                                              >
                                              > > But usually we do not boil the eggs in dye. We boil the skins to get the dye, and then let the eggs lie in the liquid for a night. that's all.
                                              >
                                              > I've wondered about that. If you were usually dyeing *cloth*, which
                                              > generally involves simmering the cloth in the dyepot, would you, when
                                              > you came to dye eggs, do it with heat or without? You get different
                                              > colors, for instance, if you boil your eggs with the onion skins, than
                                              > if you soak the eggs in boiled-onion-skin liquid.

                                              Never bothered about that. My great-granny and my granny used both (the former sometimes boiled the eggs with onion skins, the latter USUALLY put them into the ready liquid/ My other granny made it the latter way also). The point also is in the fact now they (in Russia I mean) usually add Manganese solution to onion skins, to make light mahogany colour instead of brownish one. You may never boil manganese solution in any dish, if you hope to use it again. That damn thing sticks even to glass. That is why my6 granny made the onion skins &manganese OR onion skins dye and simply put the eggs there there. A night for onion skins, several hours for manganese. Something like that.

                                              And, BTW, I can't say that my great-granny's eggs were of different colour. There's some saturation limit, imho.

                                              Bye,
                                              Alex.
                                            • Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik
                                              Greetings! ... BTW, I forgot one more thing, speaking about boiling egs with onion skins or not. Eggs boiled with onion skins (just remember that was done by
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Apr 7 12:00 AM
                                                Greetings!
                                                > i assume you are dying the eggshell and not the egg itsef. it seems
                                                > the egg white (when hardboiled) would take colour better. but i havent
                                                > done this. i dont even eat eggs myself.

                                                BTW, I forgot one more thing, speaking about boiling egs with onion skins or not.

                                                Eggs boiled with onion skins (just remember that was done by my great-granny, who first saw a gas stove when she was about 50, and the conventional countryhouse stove gives a much different temperature regime, so the orignal technology she reproduced on a gas stove, was god knows how much different) always were coloured inside. The egg white was simply brown on the surface. Only eggs boiled in the dye looked like that.

                                                Bye,
                                                Alex.
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