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Re: [sig] Digest Number 1635

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  • Sarah Brooks
    ... I find that using the Russian phrases involves following it immediately with the English translation. I also find that many of my closest friends will use
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 11, 2005
      > I was wondering if anybody has ever thought of or already has made up
      > some common phrases someone could use to liven up their persona...Any
      > thoughts?
      >
      > Vlakh


      I find that using the Russian phrases involves following it immediately with the English translation. I also find that many of my closest friends will use the Russian phrase if they *really* need my attention quickly, or if they are discreetly correcting my children and do not want to advertise the fact that the child needs correction.

      Some of the simplest phrases for your friends to not be baffled by, and to even incorporate into their own vocabulary are those invloving food, drink, greetings, etc.

      I'll break down a few here phonetically and with my predominately Volga accent, which is slightly different than that of Moscow or other regions.

      Please - Pahjalsta

      Thank you - Spaseeba (o ending sound in Moscow)

      Do you want - HoeTish?

      I want - Ya H'atchoo

      to eat? - CooSheit?

      tea? - Chai?

      To sleep - Spot?

      Apple? - Yabaka

      Toilet/Bath? - Toilette

      Compote? (a boiled fruit sugar and water drink with the chunks of fruit left in)

      Kvas? (a fermented drink made of stale bread, sugar, and served more like Shandy in England than like Beer in the US - to those of almost any age, as a beverage with things which might be yukky with a sweet drink like compote, say, dried fish).

      Hello (formal) - Drastveetsia

      Hi (very informal, usually used with/by children or very close friends/family) - Drastia

      Good Bye (formal) - Das Veedanya

      Bye Bye - (Very informal, as above) - PaKa

      Stop! - Stoy!

      Mine - Moya

      No - Nyet

      Yes - Da

      It is Not Necessary or I do not need - Ne Nada

      You are a radish head (means like you are so silly if by someone who loves you anyway and means like you are an arsehole idiot if they don't know or like you) - Tbia Radiska. If Gennadiy is my silly friend, I might refer to him by saying 'Genna es moya Radiska', (Gennady is my radish head) or simply "Genna Radiska".

      Fortunately, Russian allows almost any configuration of words to be understood, unlike many other languages. There are definitely rules of grammar, but they are definitely less required for communication than in say, English. There are people on the list with a far greater command of the language than I, I am sure, and hopefully they will be able to throw a few common phrases out, too.

      Sasha



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    • Jessica Rydill
      Actually, I would be quite interested in common Russian phrases too. I m writing this book with Russified characters and at the moment they mainly speak bits
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 11, 2005
        Actually, I would be quite interested in common Russian phrases too. I'm
        writing this book with Russified characters and at the moment they mainly
        speak bits of Yiddish. I'd quite like to give them a bit more authenticity.

        At the moment, my Russian vocabulary is somewhat basic. The only ones I can
        think of are "Borzhe moi" and "Zdravuytie". As for archaisms, my main source
        is operas by Rimsky and Mussorgsky, where people seem to shout "Slava" an
        awful lot.

        What is Slovo? (apart from the obvious!)

        Jessica (not an SCA member)


        > Message: 2
        > Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 10:10:39 -0400
        > From: Danks Cole <corgano@...>
        > Subject: Commonly used Russian phrases...
        >
        >
        > Hey all...
        >
        > I was wondering if anybody has ever thought of or already has made up
        > some common phrases someone could use to liven up their persona...Any
        > thoughts?
        >
        > Vlakh
      • goldschp@tds.net
        ... Good of you to ask...Slovo is the quarterly newsletter of the Slavic Interest Group (of which this listserv is part of as well). See it at the SIG
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 11, 2005
          >
          > What is Slovo? (apart from the obvious!)
          >
          > Jessica (not an SCA member)

          Good of you to ask...Slovo is the quarterly newsletter of the Slavic Interest Group (of which this listserv is part of as well). See it at the SIG website:

          http://slavic.freeservers.com

          Unless you were asking what the word "slovo" means.. in which case I have actually just answered that question as well. :)

          -- Paul Wickenden
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