Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Commonly used Russian phrases...

Expand Messages
  • Fionnghuala Na Lamh-Bann
    Vlakh, You mean period Russian? Or do you care if it s modern? If not, below is some simple stuff I remember from Russian class in college. (Pardon the
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 10, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Vlakh,

      You mean period Russian? Or do you care if it's modern? If not, below is some simple stuff I remember from Russian class in college.

      (Pardon the atrocious phonetic spelling. Cyrillic does NOT transliterate into Roman letters well.)

      ZDRAST-vuy: Hello (informal, to one person)

      Zdrast-VUIY-tchye: Hello (more formal, or to multiple people)

      KAK VUIY puzh-ee-VAY-yet-tchye?: How are you?

      puh-ZHAL'-stah = Please (also, "you're welcome")

      SPASS-see-bah: Thank you

      ees-veh-NEE-tcheh: Excuse me

      GOSS-pod, or BOY-ar: Lord ("moy" afterwards, for "my")

      DA-ma, or boy-ar-EE-na: Lady ("mo-YA" afterwards, for "my")

      DO sfee-DAN-ya: Goodbye (roughly, "Go with God.")

      prosh-CHAN-ya: Goodbye (secular)

      If you already know all this stuff, there is a lot more at: http://www.meirionnydd.force9.co.uk/russian/expressions.html ...but you need to have a working knowledge of Cyrillic.

      Either way, I'm sure those more fluent in the language will jump in. ;)




      ~Fionnghuala of the White Hands

      "Le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connait point." ----Blaise Pascal, 1623-1662
      (The Heart has its reasons, whereof Reason knows nothing.)

      "Caesar si viveret, ad remum dareris." (If Caesar was still alive, you'd be chained to an oar.)



      ---------------------------------
      Do you Yahoo!?
      Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Get it on your mobile phone.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Danks Cole
      I mean stuff like thank you s, hello s, good-bye s...etc....oh..and how the word should be pronounced Vlakh
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 11, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        I mean stuff like thank you's, hello's, good-bye's...etc....oh..and how
        the word should be pronounced

        Vlakh
      • Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik
        Greetings! Sorry, but... ... late P or completely OOP. More period is Zdrav bud - literally be healthy , actually hello . ... Same. ... Completely OOP. Not
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 12, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Greetings!
          Sorry, but...


          > You mean period Russian? Or do you care if it's modern? If not, below is some simple stuff I remember from Russian class in college.
          > (Pardon the atrocious phonetic spelling. Cyrillic does NOT transliterate into Roman letters well.)
          > ZDRAST-vuy: Hello (informal, to one person)
          late P or completely OOP.
          More period is Zdrav bud' - literally "be healthy", actually "hello".

          > Zdrast-VUIY-tchye: Hello (more formal, or to multiple people)
          Same.


          > KAK VUIY puzh-ee-VAY-yet-tchye?: How are you?
          Completely OOP. Not used in modern Russian either. It is the calc from How do you do - and no less formal than that.

          > puh-ZHAL'-stah = Please (also, "you're welcome")
          simpler is Proshu (analog is the Polish - Proshe, but in Russian the stress is on the 2nd syllable)

          > SPASS-see-bah: Thank you
          > ees-veh-NEE-tcheh: Excuse me
          ee-z-vee-nee. Above is given the plural - polite "plural" form of addressing (originally, the dual) is at least a century OOP. Even the tsar was addressed in the singular - zdravstvui, zdrav bud', eezveenee.

          > GOSS-pod, or BOY-ar: Lord ("moy" afterwards, for "my")
          Gospod' is the Lord. God. No human was called like that. The word afair is a borrowing from the Gothic.

          Gospodin, vocative (in address) - Gospodine (gos-po-dee-nie)

          Boyar means differrent things in early and late period: first it meant just something like "senior host" of teh Knyaz's Druzhina. Later it was just the name of teh high aristocratic class. It all depends.

          >
          > DA-ma, or boy-ar-EE-na: Lady ("mo-YA" afterwards, for "my")
          Gospozha. Dama is the OOP borrowing from the French. "Moya" is the calc from the "MY lord" or "MY Lady" and was never used in Russian, be it P or OOP.

          > DO sfee-DAN-ya: Goodbye (roughly, "Go with God.")
          ??????????
          Literally it means "see you later". No God.

          afair not used in period.

          > prosh-CHAN-ya: Goodbye (secular)
          no Russian.


          > If you already know all this stuff, there is a lot more at: http://www.meirionnydd.force9.co.uk/russian/expressions.html ...but you need to have a working knowledge of Cyrillic.

          It's a terrible salad of Russian phrases of dofferent fields - from youth slang of 1960s to litearture cliches, with at least half dozen misprints. IT IS NOT PERIOD!!!!!!!!!!!!! IT IS HARDLY RUSSIAN!!!!!!


          bye,
          Alex
        • Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik
          Greetings! Sorry, but... ... late P or completely OOP. More period is Zdrav bud - literally be healthy , actually hello . ... Same. ... Completely OOP. Not
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 12, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Greetings!
            Sorry, but...


            > You mean period Russian? Or do you care if it's modern? If not, below is some simple stuff I remember from Russian class in college.
            > (Pardon the atrocious phonetic spelling. Cyrillic does NOT transliterate into Roman letters well.)
            > ZDRAST-vuy: Hello (informal, to one person)
            late P or completely OOP.
            More period is Zdrav bud' - literally "be healthy", actually "hello".

            > Zdrast-VUIY-tchye: Hello (more formal, or to multiple people)
            Same.


            > KAK VUIY puzh-ee-VAY-yet-tchye?: How are you?
            Completely OOP. Not used in modern Russian either. It is the calc from How do you do - and no less formal than that.

            > puh-ZHAL'-stah = Please (also, "you're welcome")
            simpler is Proshu (analog is the Polish - Proshe, but in Russian the stress is on the 2nd syllable)

            > SPASS-see-bah: Thank you
            > ees-veh-NEE-tcheh: Excuse me
            ee-z-vee-nee. Above is given the plural - polite "plural" form of addressing (originally, the dual) is at least a century OOP. Even the tsar was addressed in the singular - zdravstvui, zdrav bud', eezveenee.

            > GOSS-pod, or BOY-ar: Lord ("moy" afterwards, for "my")
            Gospod' is the Lord. God. No human was called like that. The word afair is a borrowing from the Gothic.

            Gospodin, vocative (in address) - Gospodine (gos-po-dee-nie)

            Boyar means differrent things in early and late period: first it meant just something like "senior host" of teh Knyaz's Druzhina. Later it was just the name of teh high aristocratic class. It all depends.

            >
            > DA-ma, or boy-ar-EE-na: Lady ("mo-YA" afterwards, for "my")
            Gospozha. Dama is the OOP borrowing from the French. "Moya" is the calc from the "MY lord" or "MY Lady" and was never used in Russian, be it P or OOP.

            > DO sfee-DAN-ya: Goodbye (roughly, "Go with God.")
            ??????????
            Literally it means "see you later". No God.

            afair not used in period.

            > prosh-CHAN-ya: Goodbye (secular)
            no Russian.


            > If you already know all this stuff, there is a lot more at: http://www.meirionnydd.force9.co.uk/russian/expressions.html ...but you need to have a working knowledge of Cyrillic.

            It's a terrible salad of Russian phrases of dofferent fields - from youth slang of 1960s to litearture cliches, with at least half dozen misprints. IT IS NOT PERIOD!!!!!!!!!!!!! IT IS HARDLY RUSSIAN!!!!!!


            bye,
            Alex
          • Tim Nalley
            I ve always said that if I were either Tsar or Velikii Kniaz, I d have a herald sing me into court, big basso voice like a cantor in an Orthodox church. I just
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 14, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              I've always said that if I were either Tsar or Velikii
              Kniaz, I'd have a herald sing me into court, big basso
              voice like a cantor in an Orthodox church. I just love
              the coronation scene in Eisenstien's Ivan the
              Terrible, Part 1.

              --- Lisa Kies <lkies@...> wrote:

              > X-JumpGate Networks Webmail - Mason City, Iowa:
              > Originating-IP
              >
              > I've taught a class on making a Russian persona that
              > included some basic
              > Russian phrases, just to help people get deeper into
              > their own persona story.
              >
              > But I, too, have had only had limited success using
              > Russian during events. I
              > can sometimes get away with a Russian phrase where
              > the meaning would be
              > blatantly obvious, i.e. "Thank you" but most people
              > still aren't prepared to
              > play along. The best way I've found is to throw out
              > the Russian, and then
              > immediately correct myself with the English
              > translation, pretending that I said
              > the Russian accidentally and then caught myself. It
              > helps expand people's
              > horizons.
              >
              > Sofya la Rus
              >
              > Quoting LiudmilaV@...:
              > >
              > > I'd like to hear from soneone for whom it worked.
              > I know plenty of phrases,
              > > but I find that using them just baffles people. Th
              >
              >
              >
              > *************************************************
              > ***> JumpGate Networks - Mason City, Iowa <***
              > ***> Voice: 641-424-5307 Fax: 641-424-5346 <***
              > ***> www.jumpgate.net <***
              > *************************************************
              >




              __________________________________
              Do you Yahoo!?
              Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Get it on your mobile phone.
              http://mobile.yahoo.com/maildemo
            • Amber morgan
              Hi! Vlakh, Did you mean like neat things to say to liven up persona (SCA). Like culture specific Proverbs and Sayings ? I used search terms Russian Sayings
              Message 6 of 12 , Jan 14, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi! Vlakh,

                Did you mean like neat things to say to liven up persona (SCA). Like culture specific "Proverbs and Sayings"?
                I used search terms "Russian Sayings"
                and got this right away.

                http://www.friends-partners.org/oldfriends/literature/russian-proverbs.html

                Amber-who's tounge speaks but head doesn't know

                Take Care-I was looking for some of these too and maybe Alexski will speak up if there are any that are way totally ignorant---here is a link written by some russians to english speakers who can't fake the accent right. For Persona development. It covers how to say ruski sounding "the" vs. "take" ect.
                http://www.sdandi.net/essays/R-accent
              • Danks Cole
                [Clip your posts] Hey Amber... That site is a great idea....thanks alot! Vlakh [Clip your posts]
                Message 7 of 12 , Jan 16, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  [Clip your posts]

                  Hey Amber...

                  That site is a great idea....thanks alot!

                  Vlakh

                  [Clip your posts]
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.