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Commonly used Russian phrases...

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  • Danks Cole
    Hey all... I was wondering if anybody has ever thought of or already has made up some common phrases someone could use to liven up their persona...Any
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 10, 2005
      Hey all...

      I was wondering if anybody has ever thought of or already has made up
      some common phrases someone could use to liven up their persona...Any
      thoughts?

      Vlakh
    • goldschp@tds.net
      Sounds like a great article for Slovo.... :)
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 10, 2005
        Sounds like a great article for Slovo.... :)

        > I was wondering if anybody has ever thought of or already has made up
        > some common phrases someone could use to liven up their persona...Any
        > thoughts?
        >
        > Vlakh
      • Danks Cole
        Be sure to let me know if anybody submits anything seeing as how I know almost no Russian... Vlakh ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 10, 2005
          Be sure to let me know if anybody submits anything seeing as how I know
          almost no Russian...

          Vlakh

          goldschp@... wrote:

          > Sounds like a great article for Slovo.... :)
          >
          > > I was wondering if anybody has ever thought of or already has made up
          > > some common phrases someone could use to liven up their persona...Any
          > > thoughts?
          > >
          > > Vlakh
          >
          >
          >
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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Fionnghuala Na Lamh-Bann
          Vlakh, You mean period Russian? Or do you care if it s modern? If not, below is some simple stuff I remember from Russian class in college. (Pardon the
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 10, 2005
            Vlakh,

            You mean period Russian? Or do you care if it's modern? If not, below is some simple stuff I remember from Russian class in college.

            (Pardon the atrocious phonetic spelling. Cyrillic does NOT transliterate into Roman letters well.)

            ZDRAST-vuy: Hello (informal, to one person)

            Zdrast-VUIY-tchye: Hello (more formal, or to multiple people)

            KAK VUIY puzh-ee-VAY-yet-tchye?: How are you?

            puh-ZHAL'-stah = Please (also, "you're welcome")

            SPASS-see-bah: Thank you

            ees-veh-NEE-tcheh: Excuse me

            GOSS-pod, or BOY-ar: Lord ("moy" afterwards, for "my")

            DA-ma, or boy-ar-EE-na: Lady ("mo-YA" afterwards, for "my")

            DO sfee-DAN-ya: Goodbye (roughly, "Go with God.")

            prosh-CHAN-ya: Goodbye (secular)

            If you already know all this stuff, there is a lot more at: http://www.meirionnydd.force9.co.uk/russian/expressions.html ...but you need to have a working knowledge of Cyrillic.

            Either way, I'm sure those more fluent in the language will jump in. ;)




            ~Fionnghuala of the White Hands

            "Le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connait point." ----Blaise Pascal, 1623-1662
            (The Heart has its reasons, whereof Reason knows nothing.)

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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • LiudmilaV@aol.com
            In a message dated 1/10/2005 6:56:01 AM Pacific Standard Time, goldschp@tds.net writes: Sounds like a great article for Slovo.... :) ... I d like to hear from
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 10, 2005
              In a message dated 1/10/2005 6:56:01 AM Pacific Standard Time,
              goldschp@... writes:

              Sounds like a great article for Slovo.... :)

              > I was wondering if anybody has ever thought of or already has made up
              > some common phrases someone could use to liven up their persona...Any
              > thoughts?
              >
              > Vlakh





              I'd like to hear from soneone for whom it worked. I know plenty of phrases,
              but I find that using them just baffles people. Though whenever I do
              storytelling, I begin in Russian with"v necotorom tsarstve, v necotorom gosudarstve,"
              immediately switching to English translation : "in a certain kingdom, in a
              certain land" That works well, and I have to give credit for the idea to
              Mistress Soraya.

              Liudmila


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Danks Cole
              I mean stuff like thank you s, hello s, good-bye s...etc....oh..and how the word should be pronounced Vlakh
              Message 6 of 12 , Jan 11, 2005
                I mean stuff like thank you's, hello's, good-bye's...etc....oh..and how
                the word should be pronounced

                Vlakh
              • Lisa Kies
                X-JumpGate Networks Webmail - Mason City, Iowa: Originating-IP I ve taught a class on making a Russian persona that included some basic Russian phrases, just
                Message 7 of 12 , Jan 11, 2005
                  X-JumpGate Networks Webmail - Mason City, Iowa: Originating-IP

                  I've taught a class on making a Russian persona that included some basic
                  Russian phrases, just to help people get deeper into their own persona story.

                  But I, too, have had only had limited success using Russian during events. I
                  can sometimes get away with a Russian phrase where the meaning would be
                  blatantly obvious, i.e. "Thank you" but most people still aren't prepared to
                  play along. The best way I've found is to throw out the Russian, and then
                  immediately correct myself with the English translation, pretending that I said
                  the Russian accidentally and then caught myself. It helps expand people's
                  horizons.

                  Sofya la Rus

                  Quoting LiudmilaV@...:
                  >
                  > I'd like to hear from soneone for whom it worked. I know plenty of phrases,
                  > but I find that using them just baffles people. Th



                  *************************************************
                  ***> JumpGate Networks - Mason City, Iowa <***
                  ***> Voice: 641-424-5307 Fax: 641-424-5346 <***
                  ***> www.jumpgate.net <***
                  *************************************************
                • Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik
                  Greetings! Sorry, but... ... late P or completely OOP. More period is Zdrav bud - literally be healthy , actually hello . ... Same. ... Completely OOP. Not
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jan 12, 2005
                    Greetings!
                    Sorry, but...


                    > You mean period Russian? Or do you care if it's modern? If not, below is some simple stuff I remember from Russian class in college.
                    > (Pardon the atrocious phonetic spelling. Cyrillic does NOT transliterate into Roman letters well.)
                    > ZDRAST-vuy: Hello (informal, to one person)
                    late P or completely OOP.
                    More period is Zdrav bud' - literally "be healthy", actually "hello".

                    > Zdrast-VUIY-tchye: Hello (more formal, or to multiple people)
                    Same.


                    > KAK VUIY puzh-ee-VAY-yet-tchye?: How are you?
                    Completely OOP. Not used in modern Russian either. It is the calc from How do you do - and no less formal than that.

                    > puh-ZHAL'-stah = Please (also, "you're welcome")
                    simpler is Proshu (analog is the Polish - Proshe, but in Russian the stress is on the 2nd syllable)

                    > SPASS-see-bah: Thank you
                    > ees-veh-NEE-tcheh: Excuse me
                    ee-z-vee-nee. Above is given the plural - polite "plural" form of addressing (originally, the dual) is at least a century OOP. Even the tsar was addressed in the singular - zdravstvui, zdrav bud', eezveenee.

                    > GOSS-pod, or BOY-ar: Lord ("moy" afterwards, for "my")
                    Gospod' is the Lord. God. No human was called like that. The word afair is a borrowing from the Gothic.

                    Gospodin, vocative (in address) - Gospodine (gos-po-dee-nie)

                    Boyar means differrent things in early and late period: first it meant just something like "senior host" of teh Knyaz's Druzhina. Later it was just the name of teh high aristocratic class. It all depends.

                    >
                    > DA-ma, or boy-ar-EE-na: Lady ("mo-YA" afterwards, for "my")
                    Gospozha. Dama is the OOP borrowing from the French. "Moya" is the calc from the "MY lord" or "MY Lady" and was never used in Russian, be it P or OOP.

                    > DO sfee-DAN-ya: Goodbye (roughly, "Go with God.")
                    ??????????
                    Literally it means "see you later". No God.

                    afair not used in period.

                    > prosh-CHAN-ya: Goodbye (secular)
                    no Russian.


                    > If you already know all this stuff, there is a lot more at: http://www.meirionnydd.force9.co.uk/russian/expressions.html ...but you need to have a working knowledge of Cyrillic.

                    It's a terrible salad of Russian phrases of dofferent fields - from youth slang of 1960s to litearture cliches, with at least half dozen misprints. IT IS NOT PERIOD!!!!!!!!!!!!! IT IS HARDLY RUSSIAN!!!!!!


                    bye,
                    Alex
                  • Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik
                    Greetings! Sorry, but... ... late P or completely OOP. More period is Zdrav bud - literally be healthy , actually hello . ... Same. ... Completely OOP. Not
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jan 12, 2005
                      Greetings!
                      Sorry, but...


                      > You mean period Russian? Or do you care if it's modern? If not, below is some simple stuff I remember from Russian class in college.
                      > (Pardon the atrocious phonetic spelling. Cyrillic does NOT transliterate into Roman letters well.)
                      > ZDRAST-vuy: Hello (informal, to one person)
                      late P or completely OOP.
                      More period is Zdrav bud' - literally "be healthy", actually "hello".

                      > Zdrast-VUIY-tchye: Hello (more formal, or to multiple people)
                      Same.


                      > KAK VUIY puzh-ee-VAY-yet-tchye?: How are you?
                      Completely OOP. Not used in modern Russian either. It is the calc from How do you do - and no less formal than that.

                      > puh-ZHAL'-stah = Please (also, "you're welcome")
                      simpler is Proshu (analog is the Polish - Proshe, but in Russian the stress is on the 2nd syllable)

                      > SPASS-see-bah: Thank you
                      > ees-veh-NEE-tcheh: Excuse me
                      ee-z-vee-nee. Above is given the plural - polite "plural" form of addressing (originally, the dual) is at least a century OOP. Even the tsar was addressed in the singular - zdravstvui, zdrav bud', eezveenee.

                      > GOSS-pod, or BOY-ar: Lord ("moy" afterwards, for "my")
                      Gospod' is the Lord. God. No human was called like that. The word afair is a borrowing from the Gothic.

                      Gospodin, vocative (in address) - Gospodine (gos-po-dee-nie)

                      Boyar means differrent things in early and late period: first it meant just something like "senior host" of teh Knyaz's Druzhina. Later it was just the name of teh high aristocratic class. It all depends.

                      >
                      > DA-ma, or boy-ar-EE-na: Lady ("mo-YA" afterwards, for "my")
                      Gospozha. Dama is the OOP borrowing from the French. "Moya" is the calc from the "MY lord" or "MY Lady" and was never used in Russian, be it P or OOP.

                      > DO sfee-DAN-ya: Goodbye (roughly, "Go with God.")
                      ??????????
                      Literally it means "see you later". No God.

                      afair not used in period.

                      > prosh-CHAN-ya: Goodbye (secular)
                      no Russian.


                      > If you already know all this stuff, there is a lot more at: http://www.meirionnydd.force9.co.uk/russian/expressions.html ...but you need to have a working knowledge of Cyrillic.

                      It's a terrible salad of Russian phrases of dofferent fields - from youth slang of 1960s to litearture cliches, with at least half dozen misprints. IT IS NOT PERIOD!!!!!!!!!!!!! IT IS HARDLY RUSSIAN!!!!!!


                      bye,
                      Alex
                    • Tim Nalley
                      I ve always said that if I were either Tsar or Velikii Kniaz, I d have a herald sing me into court, big basso voice like a cantor in an Orthodox church. I just
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jan 14, 2005
                        I've always said that if I were either Tsar or Velikii
                        Kniaz, I'd have a herald sing me into court, big basso
                        voice like a cantor in an Orthodox church. I just love
                        the coronation scene in Eisenstien's Ivan the
                        Terrible, Part 1.

                        --- Lisa Kies <lkies@...> wrote:

                        > X-JumpGate Networks Webmail - Mason City, Iowa:
                        > Originating-IP
                        >
                        > I've taught a class on making a Russian persona that
                        > included some basic
                        > Russian phrases, just to help people get deeper into
                        > their own persona story.
                        >
                        > But I, too, have had only had limited success using
                        > Russian during events. I
                        > can sometimes get away with a Russian phrase where
                        > the meaning would be
                        > blatantly obvious, i.e. "Thank you" but most people
                        > still aren't prepared to
                        > play along. The best way I've found is to throw out
                        > the Russian, and then
                        > immediately correct myself with the English
                        > translation, pretending that I said
                        > the Russian accidentally and then caught myself. It
                        > helps expand people's
                        > horizons.
                        >
                        > Sofya la Rus
                        >
                        > Quoting LiudmilaV@...:
                        > >
                        > > I'd like to hear from soneone for whom it worked.
                        > I know plenty of phrases,
                        > > but I find that using them just baffles people. Th
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > *************************************************
                        > ***> JumpGate Networks - Mason City, Iowa <***
                        > ***> Voice: 641-424-5307 Fax: 641-424-5346 <***
                        > ***> www.jumpgate.net <***
                        > *************************************************
                        >




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                      • Amber morgan
                        Hi! Vlakh, Did you mean like neat things to say to liven up persona (SCA). Like culture specific Proverbs and Sayings ? I used search terms Russian Sayings
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jan 14, 2005
                          Hi! Vlakh,

                          Did you mean like neat things to say to liven up persona (SCA). Like culture specific "Proverbs and Sayings"?
                          I used search terms "Russian Sayings"
                          and got this right away.

                          http://www.friends-partners.org/oldfriends/literature/russian-proverbs.html

                          Amber-who's tounge speaks but head doesn't know

                          Take Care-I was looking for some of these too and maybe Alexski will speak up if there are any that are way totally ignorant---here is a link written by some russians to english speakers who can't fake the accent right. For Persona development. It covers how to say ruski sounding "the" vs. "take" ect.
                          http://www.sdandi.net/essays/R-accent
                        • Danks Cole
                          [Clip your posts] Hey Amber... That site is a great idea....thanks alot! Vlakh [Clip your posts]
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jan 16, 2005
                            [Clip your posts]

                            Hey Amber...

                            That site is a great idea....thanks alot!

                            Vlakh

                            [Clip your posts]
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