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Name help?/

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  • Marilyn Kinyon
    OK I m back with another question..lol For Kievan Russia . I have found Mariia in the Birch Bark letters. I am wanting to use this with a discriptive. What
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 14, 2004
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      OK I'm back with another question..lol

      For Kievan Russia .

      I have found Mariia in the Birch Bark letters. I am wanting to use
      this with a discriptive. What would be time appropriate for Mariia
      the cat,,, or wildcat ,,, or shrewd cat ...if there would be such a
      construct? Maybe someone would be so kind as to list the
      possiblities. Does this seem realistic and do able? If so how would
      it be written and pronounced. I am striving for 11th or 12th
      century. Thank You for your patientance and help.
    • Paul W. Goldschmidt
      I m sorry, but catty or cat-like are not period Russian naming concepts. We have very little on feminine naming practices for Kievan Rus beyond their given
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 14, 2004
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        I'm sorry, but "catty" or "cat-like" are not period Russian naming concepts.

        We have very little on feminine naming practices for Kievan Rus beyond
        their given names. What you'd find in later periods (like 15th-16th
        century Moscovy) is that women's descriptives tended to be straight
        adjectives: "red/beautiful", "quiet", "tall", "wide".

        In later Russian names, you might find surnames that evoked animal
        images. I have an article on such bynames in my "archive":

        http://www.goldschp.net/archive/zoonames.html

        But none of these are Kievan Rus names. In the 11th century, the only real
        bynames we see are patronymics. The adjectival descriptive bynames are
        exclusive to men.

        -- Paul

        At 05:39 PM 6/14/2004 +0000, you wrote:
        >OK I'm back with another question..lol
        >
        >For Kievan Russia .
        >
        >I have found Mariia in the Birch Bark letters. I am wanting to use
        >this with a discriptive. What would be time appropriate for Mariia
        >the cat,,, or wildcat ,,, or shrewd cat ...if there would be such a
        >construct? Maybe someone would be so kind as to list the
        >possiblities. Does this seem realistic and do able? If so how would
        >it be written and pronounced. I am striving for 11th or 12th
        >century. Thank You for your patientance and help.
      • Marilyn Kinyon
        OK well ..this is getting surreal.. Maybe you can give me some ideas then. What would I be called if I wanted a byname which means Petrs wife? Or if I
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 14, 2004
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          OK well ..this is getting surreal..

          Maybe you can give me some ideas then.

          What would I be called if I wanted a byname which means Petrs' wife?

          Or if I submitted Babcia Mariia do you think it would have any chance
          of getting passed?

          I really don't care about a byname but SCA requires two..lol

          Thanx again
        • Paul W. Goldschmidt
          ... Petrova zhena is the late period way of indicating this. Petrova by itself would work fine. ... Not sure what Babcia is (but I probably missed that
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 15, 2004
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            At 11:03 PM 6/14/2004 +0000, you wrote:
            >OK well ..this is getting surreal..
            >
            >Maybe you can give me some ideas then.
            >
            >What would I be called if I wanted a byname which means Petrs' wife?

            Petrova zhena is the late period way of indicating this. Petrova by itself
            would work fine.

            >Or if I submitted Babcia Mariia do you think it would have any chance
            >of getting passed?

            Not sure what Babcia is (but I probably missed that discussion). :)

            Sounds like it wouldn't hurt for you to do some research on names and
            naming practices. No need to rush into getting a name. And it sounds like
            you're pretty open to ideas. My Dictionary has a pretty in depth section
            on naming practices that can get you started, but reading up on the history
            a bit more will help you as well.

            -- Paul Wickenden
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