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Re[2]: [sig] I've been asked for help w/ N Slavic feast

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  • Alexey Kiyaikin
    Greetings ... JZJH *nod* Baking in the coals, yes. I remember reading that flatbreads were JZJH baked this way, too. Were they put in earthenware/ceramic
    Message 1 of 20 , May 27, 2004
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      Greetings

      Thursday, May 27, 2004, 6:54:05 PM, you wrote:

      >> JZJH> Frying meat in a pan isn't that typical of Western period cookery, either,
      >> JZJH> except for fish... so that's no surprise.
      >> Grilling/frying on the open fire was not typical for Russia either.
      >> baking in... (coils? ashes? what remains of the fire when it is still
      >> burning withoiut flames - damn mental block...), yes.
      JZJH> *nod* Baking in the coals, yes. I remember reading that flatbreads were
      JZJH> baked this way, too. Were they put in earthenware/ceramic baking pots,
      JZJH> wrapped in dough, wrapped in leaves, or otherwise?

      As with the Svyatoslav case, I'd suggest just digging it into coals as
      it is with potatoes (potatoes baked in coals is a VERY popular outdoor
      meal, like grilling in the USA :-) ). Pokhlebkin claims only two ways
      of cooking meat: boiling and baking. Ceramic pots of different shape ARE
      mentioned anywhere though I never dug deep enough to find out the design of the
      earliest kitchen devices. Wouldn't say they could use dough,
      agriculture was not too productive to spend wheat/rhye on that. About
      the leaves, can't say.

      Baking fish and -!- birds (chicken, goose, etc) in clay - must be a very early
      way. Clay "dough" is spread over the fish that is NOT stripped of its
      scales, or the birds that are never feathered. Then it's dug into the
      coals. When the clay becomes
      rock-hard and the dish is ready, all the scales/feathers go with the
      clay they stuck to, and the ready-to-eat meal remaiuns.
      Hunters/fishermen on major rivers often did that in XIX and XX centuries.


      --
      Bye,
      Alex mailto:Posadnik@...
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