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Re[2]: [sig] Digest Number 1456

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  • "Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik"
    Greetings! ... Some correction: kudesnik in Russian was referred to FINNISH priests/magicians only. The phrase in the chronicle referring to the death of Oleg
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 29, 2004
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      Greetings!

      > http://www.okana.org/gods.html
      >
      > I found...
      > Magical practitioners included healers (male znakhar', female znakharka),
      > fortunetellers (male kudes'nik, female vorozheia) and sorcerers (male

      Some correction: kudesnik in Russian was referred to FINNISH priests/magicians only. The phrase in the chronicle referring to the death of Oleg was the phrase not of the Russian Volkhv, but of "some Kudesnik" - a finnish one, as that "witch-profession" was not used with the Russians.

      As for "vorozheia", the question is even more interesting. The traditional Slavic=Russian pairs of words with -oro-/-ra- demonstrate too well the closeness of words in Old Bulgarian (in other words, Old Slavic, Chutch Slavonic etc) and Old Russian (the Kievan Slavs languages). Vrag-vorog, "enemy", earlier, 90% sure, "wolf". Vran-voron, "raven". Or - look here - vrat-vorozhit. The first word in modern Russian means "to lie", but even 150 years ago it was "to talk, to chatter, to speak". Earlier that meant to heal with words, to charm. That's why Vrach in modern Russian is "doctor". Thus, Vrat' and Vorozhit' are words with same roots but of different dialects, that's why they are seldom treated as similar. So, imho, the male equivalent of Vorozheia simply can't be Kudesnik. Vrach, or some other word with same root.


      Bye,
      Alex
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