Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Name Question

Expand Messages
  • Griffin de Mohun
    Here is the cite: Grifina (f) -- Grifina, Polish queen, sister of Leshka Chernii. 1297. [Khr 262] Khr=Polnoe sobranie russkikh letopisei, Vol XXII (Pt 2):
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 2 6:14 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Here is the cite:

      Grifina (f) -- Grifina, Polish queen, sister of Leshka Chernii.
      1297. [Khr 262]

      Khr=Polnoe sobranie russkikh letopisei, Vol XXII (Pt 2): Khronograf
      zapadno-russkoi redaktsii. Saint Petersburg: Tipografiia M. A.
      Aleksandrova, 1914.

      Found at http://www.sca.org/heraldry/paul/g.html.

      Heck, I dont know enough about Polish history to know if she was a
      queen. ;) You guys are the experts. Just glad to know you should
      be able to make the name masculine.

      Griffin
    • P&MSulisz
      Are you sure she was a queen? The 13th c. is an age of dukes and princes in Poland. The only king of 13th c. was Przemysl II and his wifes were: Ludgarda,
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 2 2:19 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Are you sure she was a queen? The 13th c. is an age of dukes and princes in
        Poland. The only king of 13th c. was Przemysl II and his wifes were:
        Ludgarda, Ryksa and Margarita. Anyway: I don't know any polish queen named
        'Gryfina'.
        There was a family od dukes of West Pomerania and they were names 'Gryfici'.
        'Gryfina' could be polish (? rather pomeranian) female name. It will be
        correct to make a male form by dropping '-a' and make: Gryfin.

        Greetings,
        Magdalena z Wroclawia


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Griffin de Mohun" <mohun1066@...>
        To: <sig@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, February 29, 2004 5:03 AM
        Subject: [sig] Name Question


        > I found in the imcomparable Paul Wickenden's work the name Grifina
        > as a Polish queen dated to the 13th century. I am starting to do
        > Russian and have been known as Griffin for so long it would be hard
        > to break away from the name (any help on male garb would be much
        > appreciated as well).
        >
        > My question is whether it is acceptable (knowing nothing of the
        > Polish language except that it hasnt changed much over the year-
        > thank you Leo Frankowski!) to make the name masculine by dropping
        > the 'A' making Grifin.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Griffin
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • P&MSulisz
        Hello, I m very sorry but I have to disagree with your source. Leszek II Czarny (Leshek II the Blake) born circa 1240-42 died 1288 was never a crowned king of
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 6 3:58 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Hello,
          I'm very sorry but I have to disagree with your source.
          Leszek II Czarny (Leshek II the Blake) born circa 1240-42 died 1288 was
          never a crowned king of Poland. He was duke of Sieradz (1260), Leczyca
          (1260-1263), Inowroclaw (1273-1278), Krakow (Crakow) and Sandomierz (1279).
          In 1265 he married Gryfina daughter of Roscislaw duke of Halice, ban of
          Croatia and Maczwa (Matschva - I don't know English translations). Anyway
          Gryfina:
          1) was not a queen,
          2) was not Polish - although Slavic - the same is with her name...

          You should be very careful using old secondary sources. There is enough
          sources in Polish - the best (in my opinion) for 'regular' reader could be
          recently published: "Polska - dzieje cywilizacji i narodu" (Poland - history
          of the people and its civilization) in 6 Vol., Bertelsmann Media &
          Wydawnictwo Dolnoslaskie Warszawa-Wroclaw 2003. (www.swiatksiazki.pl or
          www.wd.wroc.pl )
          SCAdians could be most interested in 2 of them:
          vol.2 Monarchia Piastow 1038-1399 (Piast's Monarchy)
          vol.3 Monarchia Jagiellonow 1399-1586 (Jagiellonian Monarchy).
          It is not necessary to know Polish to benefit from this books a lot - they
          are full of colour illustrations. I'm very glad there is finally (after all
          those years!!!) kind of exellent encyclopedia of life, art and history of
          the people who used to live on the area of the present Poland. There you
          would find a lot pictures of the artefacts and genealogical tables.

          Witaj Leszku ze Szczytna,
          There is very nice castle of the Teutonic knight's in Szczytno.
          They had very interesting life here... Do you heve something in common with
          them ;)
          Your short summary of difficult relation of Polish people with their kings
          is very accurate :) although much better was in the Piast time than later.

          Magdalena z Wroclawia

          PS: 'portki' are traditionl wollen/felt pants of polish
          highlanders.


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Griffin de Mohun" <mohun1066@...>
          To: <sig@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, March 02, 2004 3:14 PM
          Subject: [sig] Re: Name Question


          > Here is the cite:
          >
          > Grifina (f) -- Grifina, Polish queen, sister of Leshka Chernii.
          > 1297. [Khr 262]
          >
          > Khr=Polnoe sobranie russkikh letopisei, Vol XXII (Pt 2): Khronograf
          > zapadno-russkoi redaktsii. Saint Petersburg: Tipografiia M. A.
          > Aleksandrova, 1914.
          >
          > Found at http://www.sca.org/heraldry/paul/g.html.
          >
          > Heck, I dont know enough about Polish history to know if she was a
          > queen. ;) You guys are the experts. Just glad to know you should
          > be able to make the name masculine.
          >
          > Griffin
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • noli_desiste
          So I had an entire day of nothing to do while trapped at the house waiting for the gas company to hook up my gas so I can have heat... (joy.) So I started
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 5, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            So I had an entire day of nothing to do while trapped at the house
            waiting for the gas company to hook up my gas so I can have heat...
            (joy.) So I started researching a name. After looking at the very
            little early information for women and just trying my darndest...
            this is what I came up with... I have decided I was born in Kiev
            around 940. I found a masculine form of a name I really liked and
            added an "a" for the feminine form. I found alot examples of that
            that went back to the 2d-3d centuries. I tried to pick a traditional
            name and make a simple patronymic (dad was born w/ dark hair and
            named Mavr.) Is this possibly passable? :

            Emiliana Mavra

            • Emelian (m) -- "flattering."
             Emelian. Lived in the 9th century. [Buk 18]


            • Mavr (m) -- "dark."
             Mavr, martyr. 3rd Century. [Buk 158]
            o Dims: Mavreshko. 1253. [Mor 117]
            o Pat Vars: Maurin (Iev Maurin). 1611-2. [RIB II 264]
            • Mavra (f) -- "dark." Fem of Mavr.
             Mavra, martyr. 13-14th Centuries. [Lev 41]
            o Dims: Mavritsa (Mavritsa Vasil'eva doch'). 1634-42. [RIB II
            734]


            Thank you!

            Emmie
          • Iustin Branov
            I am going to take a stab at this and say I don t think this quite fits. The Emiliana works fine. The problem seems to be with the Mavra . Mavra as is
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 5, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              I am going to take a stab at this and say I don't
              think this quite fits. The Emiliana works fine. The
              problem seems to be with the 'Mavra'. Mavra as is
              listed as a feminine variant in the dictionary would
              be as a given name. I think that what you would be
              going for here would be more along the lines of
              Emiliana Mavrova would work as an early period
              version. Slightly later would be Emliana Marvovicha.
              Paul also seems to suggest that something along the
              lines of Emiliana Mavrova doch' would also be
              appropriate. That is just what I get from my reading
              though. If I'm wrong, someone can correct me.

              Iustin

              --- noli_desiste <emmiewilliams@...> wrote:

              > So I had an entire day of nothing to do while
              > trapped at the house
              > waiting for the gas company to hook up my gas so I
              > can have heat...
              > (joy.) So I started researching a name. After
              > looking at the very
              > little early information for women and just trying
              > my darndest...
              > this is what I came up with... I have decided I was
              > born in Kiev
              > around 940. I found a masculine form of a name I
              > really liked and
              > added an "a" for the feminine form. I found alot
              > examples of that
              > that went back to the 2d-3d centuries. I tried to
              > pick a traditional
              > name and make a simple patronymic (dad was born w/
              > dark hair and
              > named Mavr.) Is this possibly passable? :
              >
              > Emiliana Mavra
              >
              > • Emelian (m) -- "flattering."
              >  Emelian. Lived in the 9th century. [Buk 18]
              >
              >
              >
              > • Mavr (m) -- "dark."
              >  Mavr, martyr. 3rd Century. [Buk 158]
              > o Dims: Mavreshko. 1253. [Mor 117]
              > o Pat Vars: Maurin (Iev Maurin). 1611-2. [RIB II
              > 264]
              > • Mavra (f) -- "dark." Fem of Mavr.
              >  Mavra, martyr. 13-14th Centuries. [Lev 41]
              > o Dims: Mavritsa (Mavritsa Vasil'eva doch').
              > 1634-42. [RIB II
              > 734]
              >
              >
              > Thank you!
              >
              > Emmie
              >
              >
              >


              K Tvoim Uslugam,
              Iustin

              ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Pomestnik Iustin Branov, among the Greeks Kyrios Iustinos o Roussos
              mka Justin Griffing
              Apprentice to Mistress Mirabel Belchere
              Pursuivant-at-Large
              Shire of Mt. Freehold, East Kingdom
              AIM: JMGriffingIM
              Yahoo!: IGriffing
              ICQ: 405166689

              __________________________________________________
              Do You Yahoo!?
              Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
              http://mail.yahoo.com
            • Paul W Goldschmidt
              I d say it depends on what you think the given name is. If you re registering Mavra as the given name, then Emiliana would be a fine patronymic, literally
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 5, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                I'd say it depends on what you think the given name is. If you're
                registering Mavra as the given name, then Emiliana would be a fine
                patronymic, literally "Emilian's Mavra." But I'm not quite buying
                Emiliana as a given name with Mavra as the patronymic. They're both
                weirdnesses.

                Thanks,
                Paul Wickenden

                At 04:10 PM 11/5/2007, you wrote:

                >I am going to take a stab at this and say I don't
                >think this quite fits. The Emiliana works fine. The
                >problem seems to be with the 'Mavra'. Mavra as is
                >listed as a feminine variant in the dictionary would
                >be as a given name. I think that what you would be
                >going for here would be more along the lines of
                >Emiliana Mavrova would work as an early period
                >version. Slightly later would be Emliana Marvovicha.
                >Paul also seems to suggest that something along the
                >lines of Emiliana Mavrova doch' would also be
                >appropriate. That is just what I get from my reading
                >though. If I'm wrong, someone can correct me.
                >
                >Iustin
                >
                >--- noli_desiste
                ><<mailto:emmiewilliams%40gmail.com>emmiewilliams@...> wrote:
                >
                > > So I had an entire day of nothing to do while
                > > trapped at the house
                > > waiting for the gas company to hook up my gas so I
                > > can have heat...
                > > (joy.) So I started researching a name. After
                > > looking at the very
                > > little early information for women and just trying
                > > my darndest...
                > > this is what I came up with... I have decided I was
                > > born in Kiev
                > > around 940. I found a masculine form of a name I
                > > really liked and
                > > added an "a" for the feminine form. I found alot
                > > examples of that
                > > that went back to the 2d-3d centuries. I tried to
                > > pick a traditional
                > > name and make a simple patronymic (dad was born w/
                > > dark hair and
                > > named Mavr.) Is this possibly passable? :


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Amy Tubbs
                Here is the link to Paul s webpage that tells how to make a Patronymic: http://www.sca.org/heraldry/paul/zgrammar.html I would recommend using Mavrova or
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 5, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  Here is the link to Paul's webpage that tells how to make a
                  Patronymic: http://www.sca.org/heraldry/paul/zgrammar.html

                  I would recommend using "Mavrova" or "Mavrova doch' ".

                  A little trick I did when looking for female first names is to use the
                  search feature on the webpage and enter (f) which is what Paul uses to
                  denote female names. That way I could scroll through the plethora of
                  male names to find the few female names.

                  On Nov 5, 2007 1:58 PM, noli_desiste <emmiewilliams@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > So I had an entire day of nothing to do while trapped at the house
                  > waiting for the gas company to hook up my gas so I can have heat...
                  > (joy.) So I started researching a name. After looking at the very
                  > little early information for women and just trying my darndest...
                  > this is what I came up with... I have decided I was born in Kiev
                  > around 940. I found a masculine form of a name I really liked and
                  > added an "a" for the feminine form. I found alot examples of that
                  > that went back to the 2d-3d centuries. I tried to pick a traditional
                  > name and make a simple patronymic (dad was born w/ dark hair and
                  > named Mavr.) Is this possibly passable? :
                  >
                  > Emiliana Mavra
                  >
                  > • Emelian (m) -- "flattering."
                  >  Emelian. Lived in the 9th century. [Buk 18]
                  >
                  > • Mavr (m) -- "dark."
                  >  Mavr, martyr. 3rd Century. [Buk 158]
                  > o Dims: Mavreshko. 1253. [Mor 117]
                  > o Pat Vars: Maurin (Iev Maurin). 1611-2. [RIB II 264]
                  > • Mavra (f) -- "dark." Fem of Mavr.
                  >  Mavra, martyr. 13-14th Centuries. [Lev 41]
                  > o Dims: Mavritsa (Mavritsa Vasil'eva doch'). 1634-42. [RIB II
                  > 734]
                  >
                  > Thank you!
                  >
                  > Emmie
                  >
                  >
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.