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pysanky and kistky

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  • susannah53
    Pat Niedrich suggested that I put my question to this list. Do any of you write pysanky (AKA Ukrainian Easter eggs)? In researching Polish pisanki I read
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 9, 2004
      Pat Niedrich suggested that I put my question to this list. Do any
      of you write pysanky (AKA Ukrainian Easter eggs)? In researching
      Polish pisanki I read about pisanki being taken to graves in the
      1400s, so hope you consider them to fit into your time frame.
      Anyway, on to my question: I'm doing research to write an article
      about the "evolution of the kistka." I have a lot of great
      information about the types that people use today, but haven't been
      able to find anything about what might have been used in, say, the
      early 19th century, 18th century and before. Has anyone read
      anything that they could suggest to me? I unfortunately cannot read
      Ukrainian, Polish, Slovak, etc. but do read French and German.

      Thanks much!

      Susannah
    • MoxFool@aol.com
      In a message dated 1/9/2004 2:58:40 PM Eastern Standard Time, susannah@techgallery.com writes: Pat Niedrich suggested that I put my question to this list. Do
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 9, 2004
        In a message dated 1/9/2004 2:58:40 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        susannah@... writes:
        Pat Niedrich suggested that I put my question to this list. Do any
        of you write pysanky (AKA Ukrainian Easter eggs)? In researching
        Polish pisanki I read about pisanki being taken to graves in the
        1400s, so hope you consider them to fit into your time frame.
        Anyway, on to my question: I'm doing research to write an article
        about the "evolution of the kistka." I have a lot of great
        information about the types that people use today, but haven't been
        able to find anything about what might have been used in, say, the
        early 19th century, 18th century and before. Has anyone read
        anything that they could suggest to me? I unfortunately cannot read
        Ukrainian, Polish, Slovak, etc. but do read French and German.

        Thanks much!

        Susannah

        Witam, Czesc Panstvo!

        I have a brown wooden one my grandmother gave me. I always wondered what it
        was for.

        Dziekuje!
        Pan Zygmunt Nadratowski
        Middle Kingdom, Barony of the Northwoods, The Shire of Talonval
        Northwoods Baronial rapier champion, The Sword of Pentamere
        Student of THL Albyn Buckthorne, C.B.R.
        Living in the Land of the Free, because of the Brave


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Susan Koziel
        ... Yes, I m actually known for it in my SCA area (Avacal, AnTir). ... Decorating eggs definately falls into our time frame, but the manner in which Ukrainian
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 9, 2004
          --- MoxFool@... wrote:
          > In a message dated 1/9/2004 2:58:40 PM Eastern
          > Standard Time,
          > susannah@... writes:
          > Pat Niedrich suggested that I put my question to
          > this list. Do any
          > of you write pysanky (AKA Ukrainian Easter eggs)?

          Yes, I'm actually known for it in my SCA area (Avacal,
          AnTir).

          > In researching
          > Polish pisanki I read about pisanki being taken to
          > graves in the
          > 1400s, so hope you consider them to fit into your
          > time frame.

          Decorating eggs definately falls into our time frame,
          but the manner in which Ukrainian eggs are decorated
          has not been proven to exist for our time.

          I have read about a number of Ukrainian eggs in graves
          too, but so far have not been able to find reliable
          pictures of them, or actually anything that I would
          consider a primary source (just people quoting people
          who quoted them).
          If you've got more info, or books or references I'd
          love to know them. Its sort of a quest of mine to
          prove that batik/wax resist eggs (Ukrainian pysanki
          are period).
          Period decorated eggs ones I have found pictures of
          are from German graves, and they are dyed only one
          colour. I also have a picture of a painting that shows
          stripped eggs, it's from Italy.

          The symbolism on the eggs is definately period...
          since many of the symbols can be traced back to
          designs on Trypillian pottery & later.


          > Anyway, on to my question: I'm doing research to
          > write an article
          > about the "evolution of the kistka." I have a lot
          > of great
          > information about the types that people use today,
          > but haven't been
          > able to find anything about what might have been
          > used in, say, the
          > early 19th century, 18th century and before. Has
          > anyone read
          > anything that they could suggest to me?

          Okay, early 19th century they look like a standard
          wooden on. I have one that my grandmother used in the
          early 1900's. Before that I don't know (yet).... but
          look up the type of pysanki that are done using a drop
          & pull method, they are the simpleist to do and can be
          done with a candle and a sharpened stick to pull the
          wax. I personally stick a pin in the end of a twig.
          That way I can control where the wax drops better.

          Other then that you could look up the tools that were
          used to do ceramic wax resist. I have an 1800's
          picture of a man "painting" ceramics with what looks
          like a kistka (& not a brush - at least to me). It's
          also possible to paint eggs with wax using a standard
          paint brush.
          -Kataryna
          PS: I will fill out my web page with all the info I've
          collected this weekend (It will give me an excuse to
          get it done).
        • A Irinevna
          Hello, I am a Newbie, and have only posted to the board once, in my quest for a name (which was a no-go, unfortunately), but I have been lurking for months and
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 9, 2004
            Hello,

            I am a Newbie, and have only posted to the board once, in my quest for a name (which was a no-go, unfortunately), but I have been lurking for months and months (which does sound rather unsavoury, doesn't it?).

            This is a subject near and dear to my heart, and I am so thrilled to see someone interested in pysanky. I do it - badly, but happily. Unfortunately, I have absolutely no period info about it for you.

            I am in An Tir (Lionsgate).

            Amalie (mundane name - still looking for a persona)


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • susannah53
            Thank you all so much! I hoped I would hit paydirt here! Actually you all probably have more definitive documentation than I do; when I write articles for
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 9, 2004
              Thank you all so much! I hoped I would hit "paydirt" here! Actually
              you all probably have more definitive documentation than I do; when I
              write articles for my pysanky newsletter, they are often "fast and
              dirty" in that I don't do months of research, plus being in a rural
              area I don't have access to experts, and must rely mostly on library
              research. I suppose that I should try to find at least three sources
              that verify a story before I accept it, but....Anyway, I think that
              Sophie Knab's Polish Traditions, Customs and Folklore was my source,
              or it may have been Deborah Silverman's Polish-American Folklore.
              Actually, the date was a bit earlier than the 1400s, to wit: "one of
              the first definite written references to Polish pisanki recounts a
              miracle attributed to St. Hedwig (c. 1165-1243), the patroness of
              Silesia, who was canonized in 1267. The story was recorded by the
              wife of Silesian King Henryk Brodaty (1165-1238), who ruled from 1232-
              1238. According to the tale, an 8-year-old boy who was unable to
              walk was brought by his mother to St. Hedwig's grave. As the mother
              prayed to St. Hedwig to heal him, the boy stood up, picked up a
              pisanka that lay on the ground, and walked around the saint's
              grave." This is from my article, but it's mainly a paraphrase of the
              source. I do remember that I looked up everyone's dates, and
              wondered when King Henryk's wife (or widow I probably should say)
              recorded this account, and whether St. Hedwig had actually been
              declared a saint yet when the event supposedly happened.

              Susannah
            • Susan Koziel
              Amalie, Greetings. It s great to hear that I m not the only person in AnTir who s passionate about eggs. ... If you ever want a hand in methods to make them -
              Message 6 of 8 , Jan 11, 2004
                Amalie,
                Greetings. It's great to hear that I'm not the only
                person in AnTir who's passionate about eggs.
                :)
                If you ever want a hand in methods to make them - I've
                been doing them for years, & have routinely made them
                as gifts for the royalty that have spent the time to
                travel to Avacal.
                Saddly I have had less & less time to spend on them,
                since my mundane life has kept me really busy
                recently.
                -Kataryna


                --- A Irinevna <dunlopduo@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hello,
                >
                > I am a Newbie, and have only posted to the board
                > once, in my quest for a name (which was a no-go,
                > unfortunately), but I have been lurking for months
                > and months (which does sound rather unsavoury,
                > doesn't it?).
                >
                > This is a subject near and dear to my heart, and I
                > am so thrilled to see someone interested in pysanky.
                > I do it - badly, but happily. Unfortunately, I
                > have absolutely no period info about it for you.
                >
                > I am in An Tir (Lionsgate).
                >
                > Amalie (mundane name - still looking for a
                > persona)
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                > removed]
                >
                >
                >
              • Susan Koziel
                Okay I finally updated my site with a small bit of the Pysanki information I ve collected over the years. Hope it helps point some people in the right
                Message 7 of 8 , Jan 11, 2004
                  Okay I finally updated my site with a small bit of the
                  Pysanki information I've collected over the years.
                  Hope it helps point some people in the right
                  directions.
                  http://www.geocities.com/kataryna_dragonweaver/SCA/KPysanki.html
                  -Kataryna
                • jenne@fiedlerfamily.net
                  ... FYI, while it doesn t help with the kistky question, my dyes site might be of interest: http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/SCA/eggs/eggdyes.html -- Pani
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jan 12, 2004
                    > Okay I finally updated my site with a small bit of the
                    > Pysanki information I've collected over the years.
                    > Hope it helps point some people in the right
                    > directions.
                    > http://www.geocities.com/kataryna_dragonweaver/SCA/KPysanki.html
                    > -Kataryna

                    FYI, while it doesn't help with the kistky question, my dyes site might be
                    of interest:
                    http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/SCA/eggs/eggdyes.html

                    -- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne@...
                    "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens
                    can change the world; indeed it's the only thing that ever has..."
                    -- Margaret Mead
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