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new book on foreign accounts of Muscovy (fwd)

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  • jenne@fiedlerfamily.net
    This might be interesting to some people on the list... ... Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2003 14:35:42 -0000 From: Sergei Bogatyrev
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 14, 2003
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      This might be interesting to some people on the list...

      ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2003 14:35:42 -0000
      From: Sergei Bogatyrev <s.bogatyrev@...>
      Reply-To: Early Slavic Studies <H-EARLYSLAVIC@...>
      To: H-EARLYSLAVIC@...
      Subject: new book on foreign accounts of Muscovy

      From: <sm436@...>
      To: <s.bogatyrev@...>
      Sent: Thursday, October 30, 2003 11:43 AM
      Subject: From Stephane Mund



      Stephane MUND, "Orbis Russiarum". Genhse et diveloppement de la
      reprisentation du monde "russe" en Occident ` la Renaissance, Geneva, Droz,
      2003, 600 p. (Travaux d'Humanisme et Renaissance) SBN: 2-600-00849-7 -
      ISSN: 0082-6081
      Price: CHF 172

      Subject: Renaissance

      Though the history of relation between Western Europe and the world of the
      Eastern Slavs (Russians, Ukrainians and Belarusians) is ancient and goes
      back to the beginning of recorded Russian history in the early Middle Ages,
      significant development occurred only from the second half of the fifteenth
      century onwards. At this time, many Western European States, that were
      looking for an ally in Eastern Europe against the continuously expanding
      Ottoman empire and for new markets, began to develop interest in the
      emerging powerful Muscovy and, with a lesser degree, in Ruthenia, i.e. the
      eastern Slavic territories of Poland Lithuania. Diplomats and merchants,
      mainly from Italy, Germany, England and Poland, were among the first people
      to write descriptions about Muscovy and Ruthenia. They were soon followed
      by some famous humanists who developed a strong interest in Muscovy, the
      strange customs of its people and the despotic regime of its rulers.
      Knowledge about Muscovy and Ruthenia in Renaissance Western Europe
      circulated through many different manuscript and printed sources:
      chorographic treatises, cosmographies, chronicles, atlases? Most of the
      authors of these descriptions have never been to Muscovy nor Ruthenia. They
      wrote second-hand descriptions. Therefore the quality of their information
      about these territories are variable depending on the quality of their
      sources. The way of describing them clearly indicates the cultural shock
      provoked between Renaissance Western Europe and the world of the Eastern
      Slavs. The ?orbis Russiarum? was a strange one for the majority of Western
      European authors who tended to present a stereotyped image of the Eastern
      Slaves that still survives today.

      Stephane Mund
      Junior Research Fellow
      Wolfson College
      Slavonic Department
      Cambridge University
      Charge de Recherche FNRS
      Universite Libre de Bruxelles

      sm436@...
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