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RE: [sig] Numbering centuries

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  • Linda
    Some people are just too logical, too early in the morning. (smart, young whippersnappers...grumble ;) Maria P on her first cup of coffee So... given
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 4, 2003
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      Some people are just too logical, too early in the morning. (smart,
      young whippersnappers...grumble ;)
      Maria P on her first cup of coffee

      <clip>
      So... given that there was no Year 0, the first century *must* have been
      the years 1-100 AD. The second century therefore starts in 101 and runs
      to
      200, and so on.

      Alastair
    • purplkat@optonline.net
      Actually I use a simpler therom- Statement: The 1900 s were called The 20th Century So therefore any century is one number less.... ie - 15th C is 1400 s, 6th
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 4, 2003
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        Actually I use a simpler therom-

        Statement: The 1900's were called The 20th Century

        So therefore any century is one number less.... ie - 15th C is 1400's, 6th
        C is 500's, and so on....

        Lot easier for me
        Lady Katheryne


        Original Message:
        -----------------
        From: Alastair Millar alastair@...

        No offence to anyone intended, but to be honest I'm rather surprised that
        there is so much confusion - and list traffic - about something that is so
        basic.

        So... given that there was no Year 0, the first century *must* have been
        the years 1-100 AD. The second century therefore starts in 101 and runs to
        200, and so on.

        Alastair

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        Alastair Millar, BSc(Hons) - http://www.skriptorium.info
        Consultancy and translation for the heritage industry
        P.O.Box 11, CZ 413 01 Roudnice, Czech Republic





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      • Shannon Anderson
        so a more sig-like topic... I know that early russian dates work differently, I just don t remember how. I know that their years were different than the roman
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 4, 2003
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          so a more sig-like topic...
          I know that early russian dates work differently, I
          just don't remember how. I know that their years were
          different than the roman calendar and I would assume
          their centuries as well. I read about this once...
          Oh and the orthodox church uses different years. How
          does that relate to medieval years? Days?

          Can anyone clear this up? Bonus points for doing it in
          5 sentences or less. Extra bonus points for creating a
          mnemonic device to help me remember this time!

          ;) thanks

          Margarita

          =====
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "What saves man is to take a step. Then another step. It is always the same step, but you have to take it."
          -Antoine de Saint-Exupery
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          Shannon Anderson
          kitonlove@...

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        • Lisa Kies
          X-JumpGate Networks Webmail - Mason City, Iowa: Originating-IP The Julian Calendar was used in Russia up to the 19th century. Many Orthodox churches continue
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 5, 2003
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            X-JumpGate Networks Webmail - Mason City, Iowa: Originating-IP

            The Julian Calendar was used in Russia up to the 19th century. Many Orthodox
            churches continue to use the Julian calendar for religious holidays.

            Years were reckoned according to the year of creation, 5508 years before
            Christ. So most of the time you can get away with adding 5508 to the year.

            I don't remember right off when medieval Russians celebrated the new year, nor
            do I remember if they concerned themselves with numbering centuries the way we
            do. Somehow, I suspect they didn't.

            In service,
            Sofya la Rus

            > Quoting Shannon Anderson <kitonlove@...>:
            >
            > I know that early russian dates work differently,





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          • Nenad Lockic
            ... Some orthodox churches (Russian, Greek oldcalendar, Serbian, O.C. in America) use old (Julian) calendar while Roman Catholic and all states use official
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 5, 2003
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              > I know that early russian dates work differently, I
              > just don't remember how. I know that their years were
              > different than the roman calendar and I would assume
              > their centuries as well. I read about this once...
              > Oh and the orthodox church uses different years. How
              > does that relate to medieval years? Days?
              > Margarita

              Some orthodox churches (Russian, Greek oldcalendar, Serbian, O.C. in
              America) use old (Julian) calendar while Roman Catholic and all states
              use official Gregorian calendar. The difference between these calendars
              is 13 days (November 15th in those orthodox churches is dated as
              November 2nd; November 6th is October 24th because October have 31 days
              and 31+6-13=24). But this is only valid for 20. and 21. century. The
              problem is because Julian calendar (reformed by Julius Caesar count
              every fourth year as a 366 days long year (with February 29th). It is
              easy to remembar because years when are summer Olimpic games are 366
              days long by Julian calendar.

              Gregorian calendar, estabilished by pope Gregorius in 16th century, is
              reformed Julian calendar. Year is not long exatly 365days and 6 hours
              (as Julian calendar counts) and in 16th century was difference betweem
              March 21th and real equinox of 10 years. Gregorius deleted the
              difference, but made and the rule for "secular" years (1600, 1700, 1800,
              1900 etc.) So, "secular" years have 366 only if century number is
              devided with 4 without a rest (1600, 2000, 2400 etc. because 16:4=4,
              etc.). So, at 18th century the difference between calendars was 11 days,
              at 19th century was 12 days, at 20th and 21st centiry is 13 days, at 22
              century it will be 14 days.

              In medieval time in orthodox church was in use counting of years by
              Byzantic calendar from the begining of the world, similar as Jewish
              calendar. This calendar start with New Year on September 1st (Church New
              Year). Also was and counting years by indicts, but it is a long story.

              Some orthodox churches (Romania, Greek-newcalendar etc.) use Gregorian
              calendar when are fixed holidays, but the Easter and holidays conected
              to the Easter are by Julian calendar. But, this is a modern use in those
              churches.

              If tou need detailed information see some encyclopedia or send me a
              message on personal e-mail.

              Regards,
              Nenad
            • Alastair Millar
              ... *grin* Not been called young for a while, thanks! ;-) A.
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 6, 2003
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                > (smart, young whippersnappers...grumble ;)

                *grin*
                Not been called "young" for a while, thanks! ;-)

                A.
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