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Re: [sig] Re: Slavic households

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  • Patrick Jarrett
    Absolutely! Thanks for all the info, I apologize if I wasn t clear but that sort of stuff was exactly what I was looking for. Thanks to you all! Mikhail
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 12, 2003
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      Absolutely! Thanks for all the info, I apologize if I wasn't clear but
      that sort of stuff was exactly what I was looking for.

      Thanks to you all!
      Mikhail

      [Edited by moderator. DO NOT quote entire messages in your posts, please.]
    • P&MSulisz
      Hello, ... I think that use of each of those terms indicates a different social position of a person (at least in Polish). Here are my first association: z
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 14, 2003
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        Hello,

        Yana Wrote:
        > Dom (house/household)
        > Dvor (Yard/Courtyard, think "Scotland Yard" ;-)
        > Rod (clan/family)
        I think that use of each of those terms indicates a different social
        position of a person (at least in Polish). Here are my first association:
        'z domu' (of household/house) it will show that someone is a member of this
        family, or someone of this position;
        'z dworu' it will be probably servant of this 'dwor' (noble house)
        'z rodu' it will be someone noble= it is simple because 'rod' indicates
        noble or at least eminent (in anyway) family.
        Magdalena
      • John-Joseph Bober
        ... == From: P&MSulisz == Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 00:15:03 0200 ... This is great, but I have one question. Do we have any idea when
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 17, 2003
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          -------- Original Message --------

          ==> From: "P&MSulisz" <pmsulisz@...>
          ==> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2003 00:15:03 0200

          >Yana Wrote:
          >> Dom (house/household)
          >> Dvor (Yard/Courtyard, think "Scotland Yard" ;-)
          >> Rod (clan/family)

          > I think that use of each of those terms indicates a different
          > social position of a person (at least in Polish). Here are my first
          > association: 'z domu' (of household/house) it will show that
          > someone is a member of this family, or someone of this position;
          > 'z dworu' it will be probably servant of this 'dwor' (noble
          > house) 'z rodu' it will be someone noble= it is simple
          > because 'rod' indicates noble or at least eminent (in anyway)
          > family.
          > Magdalena

          This is great, but I have one question. Do we have any idea when
          these terms started to be used? Especially "rod" and "dom". The
          Heralds are starting to sticky about such things. It may be the
          correct definition of the word, but is it the correct *medieval*
          definition.

          Jan
        • Yana
          ... Because newer members are moderated and my computer got lonely for all its new friends at the computer shop. Sorry, just got back my computer yesterday.
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 18, 2003
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            >I also find that in XVc (and earliers) docs. the word 'dom' was used only to
            >denote a physical house/building. Not a family!
            >Magdalena
            >(I don't know why mine mails needs 4 days to come to sig-list...)


            Because newer members are moderated and my computer got lonely for all its
            new friends at the computer shop. Sorry, just got back my computer yesterday.

            --Yana
          • P&MSulisz
            ... From: John-Joseph Bober To: Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2003 3:55 PM Subject: Re: Re: [sig] Slavic
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 19, 2003
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              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "John-Joseph Bober" <jjbober4@...>
              To: <sig@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2003 3:55 PM
              Subject: Re: Re: [sig] Slavic households


              >
              > This is great, but I have one question. Do we have any idea when
              > these terms started to be used? Especially "rod" and "dom". The
              > Heralds are starting to sticky about such things. It may be the
              > correct definition of the word, but is it the correct *medieval*
              > definition.
              >
              The first usings of 'rod' in present meaning is testified in XVI c. I was
              looking of this word in earlier documents and find that instead of 'rod'
              they mention strange phrase 'moj/nasz klejnot' (mine/ours jewel) to testify
              someone's affiliation to a family. The phrase "he is ours jewel, and ours
              blood" was used like a oath formula at the courts, when somone had to prove
              his nobility, or his identity.
              It seems that in a case of non nobility they use only 'mine/ours blood' to
              prove the identity of a person.
              In Latin documents clerks used to use latin terms and in that language to
              express the idea of a rod/family was not a problem.

              I also find that in XVc (and earliers) docs. the word 'dom' was used only to
              denote a physical house/building. Not a family!
              Magdalena
              (I don't know why mine mails needs 4 days to come to sig-list...)
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