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Re: Translation assistance

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  • Jenn/Yana
    ... It is supposed to be crunchier and fresher tasting, right? I was going to make some, but now that it is cold here, having fermenting cabbage in the house
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 29, 1999
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      >Well...I was hoping you wouldn't ask as the "sauerkraut" is my sore point.
      >What is sold here in store is simply not the same thing as "pickled cabbage"
      >we used to make and eat. I don't know the right proportions myself, but my
      >Mom makes pretty decent cabbage and I may ask. It can be used in shchi I
      >believe, though we never made them (ughm, "shchi" is plural in Russian). On
      >the other hand, I know that some people pickled whole heads of cabbage and
      >used that, shredded, for cooking. This particular recipe doesn't specify,
      >though.

      It is supposed to be crunchier and fresher tasting, right? I was going to
      make some, but now that it is cold here, having fermenting cabbage in the
      house wouldn't smell good (all the windows are closed)! From the recipes
      I've seen, Russian sauerkraut is simply salted, fermented cabbage. My
      Russian-American cookbooks say you can use the bag-type sauerkraut sold
      here as a decent substitute (if well-rinsed). IIRC, Western-type
      sauerkraut has vinegar in it. (comments from anyone?). As I said before,
      I've never actually had sauerkraut in any form (yes, I know I'm missing
      out, but it smells funny), but "salted cabbage" or "pickled cabbage" would
      probably be a better name than sauerkraut for the Russian type.

      >My practical experience with Russian cookbooks suggests that you shouldn't
      >take them literally. That is, add a bit of liquid to the flour and make sure
      >it is smooth before adding it to your soup. At least that is what my Mom
      >told me I should have done when I messed up a souse recipe from a cookbook
      >some years ago :)

      Makes sense, I doubt that lots of people would be able to interpret my
      recipe shorthand. So the thickener is used in a similar manner as
      cornstarch or arrowroot when I thicken liquids.

      >By the way, where is this recipe from?

      Liakhovskaia, L.P. _Kalendar' slavianskoi zhizni i trapezi: prazdniki,
      obychai, obriady, kukhnia_. Izdatel'skii Dom MSP, Moskva. 1996. page149
      "Shchi kisslye"

      --Yana
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