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getting around to updating the Russian Knowledge Page

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  • Yana
    Yeah, yeah, I m a slacker, I know. So. After referring several people to the Russian Knowledge Page, I realized (well, I ve always known, I ve just not gotten
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 1, 2003
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      Yeah, yeah, I'm a slacker, I know.

      So. After referring several people to the Russian Knowledge Page, I
      realized (well, I've always known, I've just not gotten around to doing
      anything about it) that it is in serious need of tidying. and updating One
      of the things I would like to do is actually have something under the
      subject heading of "Common Expressions" (right there on the front page, and
      nothign to link to). I would like some basic Russian words, greetings, and
      sayings/proverbs for people to learn. Very basic, so as not to be too
      mangled when they are actually used by those who don't really know
      Russian. Better for persona play, and always nice to know for whatever
      reasons.

      So, with that in mind, please submit some ideas. If you have actual
      documentation, that is even better, because I will be including that
      information along with the phrases. Nothing out of SCA-period, if we can
      help it.

      Ideas that I have:
      * Common verbal greetings, written letter openings and closures
      (salutations and whatnot), etc. things to spice up your personal
      letters/posts.
      * yes, no, hot, cold, etc Very basic, and not too extensive.
      * "Schhi da kasha, pishcha nasha" (shchi and kasha are our native/mother
      foods). Anyone know the earliest date of this saying?
      * Something a devout Orthodox Christian in period might have known as a
      common saying/proveb. Neccessarily short.

      Get the idea?

      --Yana
    • MHoll@aol.com
      In a message dated 7/1/2003 1:19:09 PM Central Daylight Time, yana@merr.com ... I ll add to Yana s request: documentation. I already had my fingers poised
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 1, 2003
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        In a message dated 7/1/2003 1:19:09 PM Central Daylight Time, yana@...
        writes:

        > Nothing out of SCA-period, if we can
        > help it.
        >

        I'll add to Yana's request: documentation. I already had my fingers poised
        above the keyboard - hey, this is easy, and then I realized I don't have proper
        documentation at hand. I had to turn in the library books and I probably won't
        have a chance to do research in the near future. I can't look through the
        original of the Chronicles or the Domostroi and I don't have any collections of
        DATED proverbs (plenty of UNDATED and UNDOCUMENTED for-fun stuff, though).

        So for the Knowledge pages -- please include your sources.

        Masha.


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      • Yana
        I know one thing that we do have documentation for: the greetings and closures on the birchbark documents. We ve talked about them before here, but we ve
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 2, 2003
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          I know one thing that we do have documentation for: the greetings and
          closures on the birchbark documents. We've talked about them before here,
          but we've (me) have never put it down in stone someplace easy to find.

          Predslava, didn't it go something like "poklon ot..."?

          --Yana
        • MHoll@aol.com
          In a message dated 7/2/2003 10:49:15 AM Central Daylight Time, yana@merr.com ... Right! I forgot! Many of the birch-bark letters begin poklon ot.... followed
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 2, 2003
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            In a message dated 7/2/2003 10:49:15 AM Central Daylight Time, yana@...
            writes:

            > Predslava, didn't it go something like "poklon ot..."?
            >
            Right! I forgot!

            Many of the birch-bark letters begin "poklon ot...." followed by the genitive
            of (usually) the first name of the sender. Meaning (literally) "a bow
            from..." i.e. "greetings from...".

            Again, I don't have my sources. Some of the later (1980s) collections have
            indices so you can look up "poklon" and get a # for a birch-bark letter and
            maybe more formulae from there.

            Predslava.


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