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[Fwd: Re: [DIG_REF] E-books Question] (fwd)

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  • jenne@fiedlerfamily.net
    Bleah. I can t remember if I forwarded this to the list. ... Subject: Re: [DIG_REF] E-books Question Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2003 12:24:44 -0700 From: tatianap
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 27, 2003
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      Bleah. I can't remember if I forwarded this to the list.

      -------- Original Message --------
      Subject: Re: [DIG_REF] E-books Question
      Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2003 12:24:44 -0700
      From: tatianap <tatianap@...>
      Reply-To: Discussion of digital reference services
      <DIG_REF@...>
      To: DIG_REF@...

      I am a library student at the University of Alberta with Masters in Russian
      Philology right now.
      Having read all this discussion about e-books and their relevance for the
      public libraries I would like to add a few notes.
      There is a great Russian online library that contains a huge amount of
      online
      books in Russian: almots all of classical Russian literature, great world's
      literature, Russian and English and European fantasy in translation and in
      original languages, poetry, great examples of antropological, historical and
      phylosophical works and more.This library is run by one enthusiast since
      1994
      and it is absolutely free. Every day the admirerers of this online library
      sent new books converted in the electronic format so that the library is
      steadely growing.

      There is a link - http://lib.ru/

      In the situation when so many Russians emigrated from Russia to other
      countries of the world, Moshkov's Online Library becomes their home library
      and the importance of having such a resource is very hard to underestimate.
      Since not many public libraries have many multilingual books in their
      collections,espesially Russian books, this online library could be of
      help for
      the patrons and a library if the use of this online library would be
      properly
      advertised and promoted given the fact that many Russians emigrated before
      this library appeared on the Web.

      Personally, I think that there are people who do not have problems with
      reading from the screen and their needs although could be satisfied in the
      public library setting.

      Tatiana Poliakevitch


      >===== Original Message From Discussion of digital reference services
      <DIG_REF@...> =====
      >The assumption is that everyone can afford to print off a complete book so
      that
      >they can read it because physically it is not easy for all of us to read a
      >lengthy document online. I for one have to print it off. Possibly
      this is
      not
      >an issue in the US but I see that it is in Australia. One of the
      values of
      the
      >public library system is that people can access material for free where a
      very
      >real effort is made to ensure that the format is accessible to them
      (ie large
      >print, audio, etc). I wonder how accessible these online documents really
      are
      >for people with sight problems and limited finances. So I applaud the
      library
      >that bought the extra copies of "Uncle Tom's cabin" because it is
      recognizing
      >that there may be an issue of equity for some of its borrowers.
      >
      >Amanda Smithers
      >
      >Vincent Munch wrote:
      >
      >> I imagine if the larger public systems picked up the idea of
      >> loading the e-book collections, then it would trickle down to the
      smaller
      >> ones through consortia
      >> Vincent A. Munch
      >> Coordinator of Information Literacy & Education
      >> Metropolitan College of New York
      >> 75 Varick Street--12 th Fl--Library
      >> New York, NY 10013
      >> 212-343-1234 x 2009
      >> 212-343-7398 fax
      >>
      >> > -----Original Message-----
      >> > From: R._Lee_Hadden/GD/USGS/DOI
      [SMTP:R._Lee_Hadden/GD/USGS/DOI@...]
      >> > Sent: Friday, February 21, 2003 10:30 AM
      >> > To: DIG_REF@...
      >> > Subject: Re: [DIG_REF] E-books Question
      >> >
      >> > Dear Vincent:
      >> > Actually, I was thinking more about classic literature and
      18,000
      or
      >> > so other original works, which would enhance any public library's
      catalog,
      >> > rather than the usual textbooks on literature. The works of 19th
      century
      >> > American writers, such as Twain, Stowe, or Emerson; the English
      literature
      >> > of Shakespeare, Dunne and Collins; the French literature of Dumas,
      >> > Voltaire
      >> > or Rabelais; the Russian lit of Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky. Project
      Gutenberg
      >> > (http://promo.net/pg/), for example, has over 209 hits for poetry
      online
      >> > as
      >> > free e-books; 567 hits under the general term history; 88 hits
      under the
      >> > general subject of science; and 26 hits under mathematics.
      >> > My local public library recently purchased a number of extra
      copies
      >> > of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" for a special school project. However, by
      putting
      >> > the purl for the copy online in the library's catalog, computer savvy
      >> > students could download the entire work without having to come to the
      >> > library to begin with.
      >> > Incidentally, another item in favor is that these e-books is
      they
      >> > can
      >> > be used in a word processor, which can put the book in over-sized
      font or
      >> > bold print for vision-impaired users. Alternately, complex passages,
      >> > sentences or whole pages can be highlighted, copied, and sent to
      various
      >> > free web translation sites (see: http://babelfish.altavista.com/ and
      >> > others) for readers to whom English is not the first language.
      Ditto for
      >> > foreign works in their original language.
      >> > I wish that libraries would easily and cheaply be able to access
      the
      >> > cataloging records of these services to add to their local library
      >> > catalog.
      >> > That will come someday, but, Alas! not today.
      >> >
      >> > Lee Hadden (These opinions are my own- no one else would have them,
      >> > anyway!)
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > Vincent Munch
      >> > <MunchV@METROPOLI To:
      >> > DIG_REF@...
      >> > TAN.EDU> cc:
      >> > Sent by: Dig_Ref Subject: Re: [DIG_REF]
      >> > E-books Question
      >> > <dig_ref@listserv
      >> > .syr.edu>
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > 02/20/2003 05:29
      >> > PM
      >> > Please respond to
      >> > Discussion of
      >> > digital reference
      >> > services
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > Sorry, could not reply to Lee directly, email would not go through.
      >> > Lee:
      >> > Having worked in public libraries for most of my career and now in
      >> > academic,
      >> > I would guess that the subject matter in the e-books from an academic
      >> > library collection would not be used by a public library audience as
      much.
      >> >
      >> > While public library users do research in addition to entertainment
      >> > reading,
      >> > they as a whole do not have the need for accessing academic research
      >> > materials. It is analogous to public libraries not buying textbooks.
      >> >
      >> > Vincent A. Munch
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > -----Original Message-----
      >> > From: R._Lee_Hadden/GD/USGS/DOI
      >> > To: DIG_REF@...
      >> > Sent: 2/20/03 4:02 PM
      >> > Subject: Re: [DIG_REF] E-books Question
      >> >
      >> > Dear Susan:
      >> > E-books are an evolving field. My own book title (photos and
      all)
      >> > is
      >> > on netLibrary at:
      >> > http://www.netlibrary.com/ebook_info.asp?product_id=42010
      >> > and I'm very happy with it.
      >> > I rarely check out a netLibrary item- I simply read a section or
      >> > chapter online as needed. The titles are added to my public library
      >> > catalog, and can quickly link to the correct page.
      >> > One of my griefs is that so few e-books are cataloged in public
      >> > and
      >> > school libraries, and so people don't know they are even
      available. The
      >> > University of Pennsylvania (http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/) has
      >> > over
      >> > 18,000 titles of free e-books, and few of these links are cataloged in
      >> > public or university libraries. So far, the main emphasis has been on
      >> > commercial sales of e-books, rather than making so many books
      available
      >> > to
      >> > so many more people. The Gutenberg Project (http://promo.net/pg/)
      is an
      >> > excellent example of how books can be put online and available to all.
      >> > Regretfully, many subsequent projects duplicate their efforts with
      less
      >> > quality control and higher costs. There is even less coordination
      on the
      >> > scanning and presentation of e-books in languages other than English,
      >> > such
      >> > as the excellent work done by the French National Library or some
      of the
      >> > German efforts.
      >> > The sales angle didn't work, since the publishers were trying to
      >> > get
      >> > the same bucks for a e-book that they charged for a paper copy.
      Hogwash!
      >> > Selling a thousand copies of a paperback at $7.95 means only a little
      >> > profit to the publisher after everyone gets his cut. Selling a
      thousand
      >> > copies of an e-book for $7.95 is almost all profit. No wonder they did
      >> > themselves in. The publishers got too greedy.
      >> > The publishers also wanted too much control. They made e-books
      >> > that
      >> > could be only read on special machines or in other controlled
      >> > circumstances, such as with special software. I think that if they had
      >> > concentrated on stimulating demand rather than immediate profits, they
      >> > would have gotten further along in the business. Instead ,they were so
      >> > intent upon not losing money that they didn't develop the market.
      >> > I have also found that there is a large market for downloaded
      >> > books
      >> > on PDA's. BlackMask.com does a good job of formatting public domain
      >> > works
      >> > into favorite e-book files, which I can use to read on the subway
      or at
      >> > odd
      >> > times. Again, libraries have dropped the ball by not making many of
      >> > these
      >> > free resources available to their patrons, and if they don't know
      about
      >> > them, they won't use 'em.
      >> >
      >> > Lee Hadden (These opinions are my own!)
      >> >
      >> > ---
      >> > To sign off from DIG_REF, send a
      >> > message to LISTSERV@...
      >> > with the command SIGNOFF DIG_REF.
      >> >
      >> > ---
      >> > To sign off from DIG_REF, send a
      >> > message to LISTSERV@...
      >> > with the command SIGNOFF DIG_REF.
      >>
      >> ---
      >> To sign off from DIG_REF, send a
      >> message to LISTSERV@...
      >> with the command SIGNOFF DIG_REF.
      >
      >--
      >Amanda Smithers
      >Information and Research Services Manager
      >University of Wollongong Library
      >
      >Phone: (02) 4221 3332
      >Fax: (02) 4221 4663
      >
      >---
      >To sign off from DIG_REF, send a
      >message to LISTSERV@...
      >with the command SIGNOFF DIG_REF.

      ---
      To sign off from DIG_REF, send a
      message to LISTSERV@...
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      --
      / Jennifer Heise, Helpdesk/Librarian, Email: jahb@...
      \ \ Lehigh Library & Technology Services, Phone: (610) 758-3072
      / Fairchild-Martindale Library, 8A Packer Ave, Bethlehem PA 18015

      "Comment is free, but facts are on expenses." -- Tom Stoppard
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