Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Off topic, but concerned... turkeys!

Expand Messages
  • Britta Parsons
    This is more about the second part of Larisa s query; the part about what types of fowl appeared on Slavic tables. At any rate I can speak a little about
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 27, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      This is more about the second part of Larisa's query; the part about what
      types of fowl appeared on Slavic tables. At any rate I can speak a
      little about Polish. My information comes from _Food and Drink in
      Medieval Poland_(or whatever that title is!) Chickens, duck, geese,
      guinea hens, occasionally pigeons. It's been a while since I've read the
      Domostroi, and so cannot speak to that. Perhaps someone else can speak
      to the consumption of such things as peacocks and swan. I seem to
      remember such things being done in Western Europe. Anyone else?

      Vasilisa Myshkina

      Larisa's husband isn't a turkey. A Scot and an archer,yes, a turkey, no.
      Just had to add that in :)
      ___________________________________________________________________
      Get the Internet just the way you want it.
      Free software, free e-mail, and free Internet access for a month!
      Try Juno Web: http://dl.www.juno.com/dynoget/tagj.
    • MHoll@aol.com
      From a variety of sources (including reports on archeological digs and Chronicles), I had compiled the following list: Chickens (and eggs), geese, ducks, and
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 28, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        From a variety of sources (including reports on archeological digs and
        Chronicles), I had compiled the following list:

        Chickens (and eggs), geese, ducks, and even cranes (!) made up domestic fowl.

        Swans, wild geese, stork, wild ducks, black grouse, hazel grouse.

        Important notes: Game and fowl had to be killed and bled. The Church forbade
        eating strangled animals. I'm not really clear why.

        Pigeons, doves were not eaten, because God appeared in the form of a dove at
        Christ's baptism. If anyone asks, what about famine? From everything I've
        learned, read, and heard, the Church was fairly understanding in hard times.

        Horse meat was also avoided, and in fact, the Chronicles relate of "eating
        horse meat" as a sign of extreme famine.

        Bear meat was taboo. Some scholars think it may be because of an ancient bear
        cult, but I haven't seen any proof of that, just speculations.

        But the most remarkable thing about eating in Russia was the number of lean
        and fast days, and therefore the amount and variety of fish eaten!

        Predslava,
        getting hungry all of a sudden.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.