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Rules and Regulations Under the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act

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  • Linda Learn
    Here is the site that tells the labeling required of textile fiber products. The way it reads this may be for finished products, i.e. clothing, coats, rugs,
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 21, 2003
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      Here is the site that tells the labeling required of textile fiber products.
      The way it reads this may be for finished products, i.e. clothing, coats,
      rugs, curtains, etc. It may also be for yard goods although I haven't read
      every word of it to see if they are mentioned.

      Generalized: any fiber used, if 5% or more by physical weight of the total
      fiber content, must be labeled exactly. If less that , it can be labeled
      "other fiber"... or if a couple fibers are used and still below 5% , they
      can be combined and labeled "other fibers" ........UNLESS.... that "fiber
      present in a textile fiber product which has a clearly established and
      definite functional significance when present in the amount contained in
      such product, as for example: "96 percent Acetate 4 percent Spandex" "
      (which means that if the spandex gives the fiber a functional stretch you
      have to label it to show the spandex).
      Wool is treated slightly differently. The term wool means the fiber from the
      fleece of the sheep, lamb or hair of the Angora or Cashmere goat, and may
      include camel, alpaca, llama and vicuna, which has never been reclaimed from
      a woven or felted product.
      Recycled wool means wool that was made up into a woven or felted product and
      then returned to the fibrous state and reused. This can be fabric that was
      never used by a consumer and then reprocessed (mill ends, flawed & rejected,
      etc.) , or that was used by a consumer and then reprocessed (old coats,
      blankets, etc)

      http://www.ftc.gov/os/statutes/textile/rr-textl.htm#303.2

      I know that when purchasing bolts of fabric from a distributor, they always
      have a label on the end that includes fiber percentage content and care
      instructions. This is supposed to be the law as I learned it. When you buy
      "flat fold" or "mill end" pieces, you may not get that information. ... You
      are buying it "as is" . WalMart should be selling it with proper
      information labeled on the end of the bolt. Unless they have found a way to
      get around it. Walmart sells "grade B" fabrics as well as mill ends. Grade
      B fabrics are lesser quality textiles that have been printed with current
      popular designs. Mill ends can be a good quality fabric that is a leftover
      from a season prior to the present or several years prior. Some major
      designers won't let the leftover fabrics, for which they've contracted the
      production, be sold off to jobbers for at least a year or two so they can't
      be used to compete with their clothing production.
      And now you know more than you've always wanted to know ;)
      Maria P.... Polish fabric merchant
      aka http://www.classactfabrics.com
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