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Re: [sig] Vocab. question: pagan priests

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  • Alex Grant [T]
    There are also related Russian words, volhv and kudesnik But I am not sure of the origins. ... is
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 3, 2003
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      There are also related Russian words, "volhv" and "kudesnik"
      But I am not sure of the origins.


      > According to my trusty 'Akademicky slovnik cizich slov', "z'rec" [zhrets]
      is
      > the correct word in Czech for a pagan priest ""particularly among the
      > Slavs"". Said z'rec made the sacrifice of the "z'ertva" [zhertva] or
      > offerings.
      >
      > The origin for both words is claimed as Russian... can anyone confirm the
      > original Russian words please? (And I'm assuming that the roots lie rather
      > deeper than in contemporary Russian, but who knows...?)
      >
      > Cheers!
      >
      > Alastair
    • Alexey Kiyaikin
      Greetings Alastair! Tuesday, June 03, 2003, 6:12:07 PM, you wrote: AM According to my trusty Akademicky slovnik cizich slov , z rec [zhrets] is AM the
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 3, 2003
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        Greetings Alastair!

        Tuesday, June 03, 2003, 6:12:07 PM, you wrote:

        AM> According to my trusty 'Akademicky slovnik cizich slov', "z'rec" [zhrets] is
        AM> the correct word in Czech for a pagan priest ""particularly among the
        AM> Slavs"". Said z'rec made the sacrifice of the "z'ertva" [zhertva] or
        AM> offerings.

        AM> The origin for both words is claimed as Russian... can anyone confirm the
        Old Russian maybe? The verb zherati (first vowel is the same sound &
        letter as the first vowel in "Bulgaria") - sacrifice as a priest - is
        mentioned in Old Russian texts depicting events of 10-12 centuries.
        AM> original Russian words please? (And I'm assuming that the roots lie rather
        AM> deeper than in contemporary Russian, but who knows...?)
        Maybe it's indoeuropean, but I'm no specialist in shifting of
        consonants in the course of years. At least, "druid" has different
        meaning, as well as "wlkodlak", etc.

        --
        Bye,
        Alex mailto:Posadnik@...
      • Alastair Millar
        Thanks to all who answered on this one... nice to have a check on the dictionaries every now and then! Alastair
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 5, 2003
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          Thanks to all who answered on this one... nice to have a check on the
          dictionaries every now and then!

          Alastair
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