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Russian saints

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  • Alexey Kiyaikin
    Greetings! Not a lecture but something to remember. In Russian Orthodoxy there is no such a notion as saint . There is a rich variety of saints depending on
    Message 1 of 1 , May 26, 2003
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      Greetings!

      Not a lecture but something to remember. In Russian Orthodoxy there is
      no such a notion as "saint". There is a rich variety of saints
      depending on the reason the person was canonized. E.g., there is a
      Muchenik (martyr??? no religious dictionary) - a person that suffered much and was murdered
      for his faith. A deeper degree is velikomuchenik.
      But also, there is a Strastoterpets - a person who
      suffered physically & mentally. As I once mentioned, the notion of a
      saint depends on what he\she did, not who he\she was. So, Nicolas II
      of Russia was canonized as Strastoterpets. He was a (ehcuse my French)
      bastardly hopeless ruler, and only the fact his execution was
      outstandingly cruel, made the Church accept the idea to make him a
      saint. The hierarchs repeated it once and again that Nicolas was not
      declared an good\ideal\worthy man, he was just remembered for the sufferings he
      came through. Same thing with st. Vladimir the Baptizer & st.
      Alexander (don't remember the epithet). They were canonized for what
      they did, and are treated apart from their real characters & other
      deeds. No offence is made to any Orthodox if that attitude is kept to.
      But if the Deed of the saint is shown differently or with different
      reasons, some people CAN find offence in it. Though, no Rushdi case in
      Orthodox world yet existed.



      --
      Bye,
      Alex mailto:Posadnik@...
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