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Kissels

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  • Parsla A Liepa
    ... Here s a rough translation to English from the cookbook that my grandmother received in the DP camp in Germany: Mix one cup water and one cup sugar and
    Message 1 of 18 , Apr 1, 2003
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      >
      > Yummy... Anyone have any recipes? :)
      >

      Here's a rough translation to English from the cookbook that my
      grandmother received in the DP camp in Germany:

      Mix one cup water and one cup sugar and boil until sugar has dissolved.
      Add diced fruit or strained berries, watching so that they do not
      overcook. Slowly add 1 or 2 tablespoons of starch (mixed with a small
      amount of cold water), keeping an eye on the thickness of the sauce.
      Spoon off the foam during the boiling process. Once the fruit is cooked,
      you can remove them and add more berries to the sauce. Sprinkle sugar on
      top so that a skin doesn't form.

      Raspberries and strawberries should sit in sugar overnight before boiling.
      Hard berries like cherries should be boiled in a small amount of water
      before boiling in the sugar syrup. Red currants and other juicy berries
      should be strained through a sieve first and the skins removed.

      Parsla
    • jenne@fiedlerfamily.net
      ... Interesting. Is this a vinagrette? Salads dressed with salt, oil, and vinegar were a common period dish in other places. ... Hm. There are references to
      Message 2 of 18 , May 2, 2003
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        > MS> Vinyegret
        > Very OOP

        Interesting. Is this a vinagrette? Salads dressed with salt, oil, and
        vinegar were a common period dish in other places.

        > MS> Spring Onion Salad
        > No salads except radishes in oil and pickled mushrooms are period.

        Hm. There are references to vinegar and pickled cucumbers, lemons and
        plums in the Domostroi. Do these mean something else than pickled sallat?

        -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa jenne@...
        "I'm tired. I'm tired of feeling rejected by the American people. I'm
        tired of waking up in the middle of the night worrying about the war."
        -- L.B. Johnson
      • MHoll@aol.com
        In a message dated 5/2/2003 8:27:11 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Not at all. It s a mixed salad with potatoes and/or beans and beets, cabbage, carrots, and
        Message 3 of 18 , May 3, 2003
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          In a message dated 5/2/2003 8:27:11 PM Central Daylight Time,
          jenne@... writes:

          > >MS> Vinyegret
          > >Very OOP
          >
          > Interesting. Is this a vinagrette? Salads dressed with salt, oil, and
          > vinegar were a common period dish in other places.
          >

          Not at all. It's a mixed salad with potatoes and/or beans and beets, cabbage,
          carrots, and other stuff. The dressing we use is oil and vinegar, but I've
          read recipes that call for mayonnaise. Not period without adjustments.

          Predslava.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Alexey Kiyaikin
          Greetings Saturday, May 03, 2003, 5:25:33 AM, you wrote: jfn Interesting. Is this a vinagrette? Salads dressed with salt, oil, and jfn vinegar were a common
          Message 4 of 18 , May 4, 2003
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            Greetings

            Saturday, May 03, 2003, 5:25:33 AM, you wrote:

            jfn> Interesting. Is this a vinagrette? Salads dressed with salt, oil, and
            jfn> vinegar were a common period dish in other places.
            No, a viniegret is a potato salad of potatoes, carrots, beetroot, salted
            cucumbers, chopped sauerkraut, green (canned) peanuts, dressed with
            vegetable oil (sunflower mainly). It became popular as a cheap
            substitute to "more expensive" dishes within the 20 century, no
            earlier. AFAIR, the French name from the very beginning had nothing in
            common with the dish.

            >> MS>    Spring Onion Salad
            >> No salads except radishes in oil and pickled mushrooms are period.

            jfn> Hm. There are references to vinegar and pickled cucumbers, lemons and
            jfn> plums in the Domostroi. Do these mean something else than pickled sallat?
            Yes, but the point is that Russian kitchen (in the snack part) was extremely
            mono-component in period. Salads of several components were introduced
            in 19 century, by its end. A good example is Olivier salad, created in
            1890s or 1900s in a Moscow restaurant. Before that, all the pickled
            snacks were only pickled vegetables & mushrooms, also mono-component.
            Even different mushrooms were salted separately. And all that was
            served also mono-componently, salted mushrooms (each times naming
            which mushrooms exactly), salted cucumbers, soaked apples, etc. They
            could dress it with vegetable oil, but that didn't make a salad in the
            modern sense.

            BTW, in Domostroi,
            pickled lemons meant not a new taste but a lengthened shelf life. That
            meant salt more than vinegar.
            Strictly pickling, not salting, vegetables, is not characteristic of
            Russia until late 1990s. Even now, with all those pickled cucumbers
            from Central Europe, there is a strict difference in taste between
            canned vegetables from Europe and Russian ones, especially barrelled,
            not canned ones. Russians simply add more salt to the liquid.


            --
            Bye,
            Alex mailto:Posadnik@...
          • Alexey Kiyaikin
            Greetings Jana! Sunday, May 04, 2003, 8:19:46 PM, you wrote: some corrections. AK No, a viniegret is a potato salad of potatoes, carrots, beetroot, salted AK
            Message 5 of 18 , May 4, 2003
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              Greetings Jana!

              Sunday, May 04, 2003, 8:19:46 PM, you wrote:

              some corrections.

              AK> No, a viniegret is a potato salad of potatoes, carrots, beetroot, salted
              AK> cucumbers, chopped sauerkraut, green (canned) peanuts, dressed with
              AK> vegetable oil (sunflower mainly).

              Onions, of course. But no beans as Predslava suggested. Beans are
              simply off menu for period Russian kitchen. Of all that food only
              peanuts were used.



              --
              Bye,
              Alex mailto:Posadnik@...
            • jenne@fiedlerfamily.net
              ... Alexey, are you saying that peanuts were used in period Russian cooking? Do you mean some other food than the peanut we Americans are used to, which is
              Message 6 of 18 , May 5, 2003
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                > AK> No, a viniegret is a potato salad of potatoes, carrots, beetroot, salted
                > AK> cucumbers, chopped sauerkraut, green (canned) peanuts, dressed with
                > AK> vegetable oil (sunflower mainly).
                >
                > Onions, of course. But no beans as Predslava suggested. Beans are
                > simply off menu for period Russian kitchen. Of all that food only
                > peanuts were used.
                >

                Alexey, are you saying that peanuts were used in period Russian cooking?
                Do you mean some other food than the 'peanut' we Americans are used to,
                which is native to South America?

                -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa jenne@...
                "I'm tired. I'm tired of feeling rejected by the American people. I'm
                tired of waking up in the middle of the night worrying about the war."
                -- L.B. Johnson
              • jenne@fiedlerfamily.net
                ... Thanks for the info, Predslava. -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa jenne@fiedlerfamily.net I m tired. I m tired of feeling rejected by the American people. I m tired
                Message 7 of 18 , May 5, 2003
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                  > Not at all. It's a mixed salad with potatoes and/or beans and beets, cabbage,
                  > carrots, and other stuff. The dressing we use is oil and vinegar, but I've
                  > read recipes that call for mayonnaise. Not period without adjustments.

                  Thanks for the info, Predslava.

                  -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa jenne@...
                  "I'm tired. I'm tired of feeling rejected by the American people. I'm
                  tired of waking up in the middle of the night worrying about the war."
                  -- L.B. Johnson
                • jenne@fiedlerfamily.net
                  ... So which mushrooms are named in the Domostroi and other period texts? Inquiring minds want to know! ... I wasn t worried about Modern sense of salad, but
                  Message 8 of 18 , May 5, 2003
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                    >
                    > jfn> Hm. There are references to vinegar and pickled cucumbers, lemons and
                    > jfn> plums in the Domostroi. Do these mean something else than pickled sallat?
                    > Yes, but the point is that Russian kitchen (in the snack part) was extremely
                    > mono-component in period. Salads of several components were introduced
                    > in 19 century, by its end. A good example is Olivier salad, created in
                    > 1890s or 1900s in a Moscow restaurant. Before that, all the pickled
                    > snacks were only pickled vegetables & mushrooms, also mono-component.
                    > Even different mushrooms were salted separately. And all that was
                    > served also mono-componently, salted mushrooms (each times naming
                    > which mushrooms exactly),

                    So which mushrooms are named in the Domostroi and other period texts?
                    Inquiring minds want to know!

                    >salted cucumbers, soaked apples, etc. They
                    > could dress it with vegetable oil, but that didn't make a salad in the
                    > modern sense.

                    I wasn't worried about Modern sense of salad, but period salats.

                    > BTW, in Domostroi,
                    > pickled lemons meant not a new taste but a lengthened shelf life. That
                    > meant salt more than vinegar.

                    I'm confused here. Can you give more information on the period method for
                    pickling lemons in Russia? All I have is the reference to pickled lemons
                    and vinegar from the Domostroi translation, and that's not much help in
                    reconstructing the recipe. Lemons with salt show up as a sallat in period
                    German cooking, I think, but I don't want to generalize from that if there
                    is period documentation for making them another way.

                    -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa jenne@...
                    "I'm tired. I'm tired of feeling rejected by the American people. I'm
                    tired of waking up in the middle of the night worrying about the war."
                    -- L.B. Johnson
                  • LiudmilaV@aol.com
                    In a message dated 5/5/2003 5:54:22 AM Pacific Daylight Time, ... I am not sure why Alex says peanuts when he is supposed to say green peas. Some vinigret
                    Message 9 of 18 , May 5, 2003
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                      In a message dated 5/5/2003 5:54:22 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
                      jenne@... writes:


                      > > Onions, of course. But no beans as Predslava suggested. Beans are
                      > > simply off menu for period Russian kitchen. Of all that food only
                      > > peanuts were used.
                      > >
                      >
                      > Alexey, are you saying that peanuts were used in period Russian cooking?
                      > Do you mean some other food than the 'peanut' we Americans are used to,
                      > which is native to South America?
                      >

                      I am not sure why Alex says "peanuts" when he is supposed to say green peas.
                      Some vinigret recipes call for those, though in my family we don't put them
                      in vinigret.

                      Liudmila


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • jenne@fiedlerfamily.net
                      ... Ah! That makes sense! -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa jenne@fiedlerfamily.net I m tired. I m tired of feeling rejected by the American people. I m tired of waking
                      Message 10 of 18 , May 5, 2003
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                        > > Alexey, are you saying that peanuts were used in period Russian cooking?
                        > > Do you mean some other food than the 'peanut' we Americans are used to,
                        > > which is native to South America?
                        >
                        > I am not sure why Alex says "peanuts" when he is supposed to say green peas.
                        > Some vinigret recipes call for those, though in my family we don't put them
                        > in vinigret.

                        Ah! That makes sense!

                        -- Jadwiga Zajaczkowa jenne@...
                        "I'm tired. I'm tired of feeling rejected by the American people. I'm
                        tired of waking up in the middle of the night worrying about the war."
                        -- L.B. Johnson
                      • Alexey Kiyaikin
                        Greetings Monday, May 05, 2003, 4:53:38 PM, you wrote: jfn Alexey, are you saying that peanuts were used in period Russian cooking? jfn Do you mean some
                        Message 11 of 18 , May 5, 2003
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                          Greetings

                          Monday, May 05, 2003, 4:53:38 PM, you wrote:



                          jfn> Alexey, are you saying that peanuts were used in period Russian cooking?
                          jfn> Do you mean some other food than the 'peanut' we Americans are used to,
                          jfn> which is native to South America?
                          Damn. Peas of course. Last four weeks drove me completely crazy.
                          Sorry, peas - not peanuts.




                          --
                          Bye,
                          Alex mailto:Posadnik@...
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