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Re[2]: [sig] New to list

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  • Alexey Kiyaikin
    Greetings Ivan! ... What item, BTW? I am not sure the things Russian church uses now are the same it used, say, in 12 century. Also, there is a difference
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 11, 2003
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      Greetings Ivan!
      > Does anyone have an suggestions on an easy way of embroidery?
      >
      > Better yet, does anyone know someone who would be willing to do some
      > embroidery work for garb? In looking at monastic garb of the period, my
      > fears have come true and there is an item that I'll need that would be
      > embroidered. My sewing skills are less than minimal, therefore I'd like to
      > see about paying someone who could do this. The item is still made and worn
      > by monastics, but the American source I've found for it is $150.
      >

      What item, BTW? I am not sure the things Russian church uses now are
      the same it used, say, in 12 century. Also, there is a difference
      between a capital city monastery and a far-away Skit or Pustin'. All
      the sources, say, showed extreme modesty of Sergi Radonezhsky's
      clothes, and he was not thew only one.

      Bye,
      Alex.
    • sismith42
      ... *snip* ... Hello Ivan, You might want to trade skills with someone in your area-- you do X for them and they embroider for you. (Get the deal worked out
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 12, 2003
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        > Better yet, does anyone know someone who would be willing to do some
        > embroidery work for garb? In looking at monastic garb of the

        *snip*

        > Any suggestions?
        >
        > Chernst Ivan

        Hello Ivan,
        You might want to trade skills with someone in your area-- you do X
        for them and they embroider for you. (Get the deal worked out in
        writing: who's doing what, when it should be done by, etc)
        Also, what sort of item is it? What style of embroidery? Depending
        on how authentic you're driven to be, you might be able to fake it
        with paint or printed cloth. Heck, some styles (specifically
        needlepoint) start out with a painted "canvas", which is then just
        covered by the appropriate color thread or wool. (It's fun, kinda
        paint-by-numbers :) )

        Good Luck, Stefania
        (I'd volunteer to help, but suspect I'm on the wrong side of the
        Atlantic)
      • Jenne Heise
        ... On the other hand, embroidery on religious clothing is very easy to document in period-- in fact, almost all the extant examples we have are religious
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 12, 2003
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          > Greetings Ivan! > Does anyone have an suggestions on an easy way of
          > embroidery? > > Better yet, does anyone know someone who would be
          > willing to do some > embroidery work for garb? In looking at monastic
          > garb of the period, my > fears have come true and there is an item
          > that I'll need that would be > embroidered. My sewing skills are less
          > than minimal, therefore I'd like to > see about paying someone who
          > could do this. The item is still made and worn > by monastics, but
          > the American source I've found for it is $150. >
          >
          > What item, BTW? I am not sure the things Russian church uses now are
          > the same it used, say, in 12 century. Also, there is a difference
          > between a capital city monastery and a far-away Skit or Pustin'. All
          > the sources, say, showed extreme modesty of Sergi Radonezhsky's
          > clothes, and he was not thew only one.

          On the other hand, embroidery on religious clothing is very easy to
          document in period-- in fact, almost all the extant examples we have are
          religious clothing.

          Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise jenne@...
          "I postpone death by living, by suffering, by error, by risking, by
          giving, by losing." -- Anais Nin
        • Yana
          ... Welcome to the List! Don t worry about lacking knoweldge, we ll fill you right up. May not be correct knowledge.... ... Be sure and check out the Russian
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 12, 2003
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            >I thought I would take this time to introduce myself, as I am new to this
            >E-list, my name is Katerina Sina Samovicha. I have only recently settled on
            >a Russian persona, so I'm afraid my knowledge is still rather lacking.


            Welcome to the List! Don't worry about lacking knoweldge, we'll fill you
            right up. May not be correct knowledge....


            >My interests in Russian culture are focused mostly on embroidery, weaving,
            >cooking, and folktales, though I am always open to new hobbies. I have
            >recently written a story in the style of Russian folktales, and fully intend
            >to write more once I have time. However, right now I have been trying to
            >find some period embroidery designs for a dress I am working on.

            Be sure and check out the Russian Knowledge Page
            <http://medievalrussia.freeservers.com> (and feel free to give me a virtual
            smack for not updating it in so long) for links and information.


            >I look forward to learning as much as I can,


            As do we all.

            --Yana
          • Justin Griffing
            ... Alexey, The item I am looking at would be the schema. It is different in the Russian Church now as most monks it would not even be visible, but worn under
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 12, 2003
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              > > What item, BTW? I am not sure the things Russian church uses now are

              Alexey,

              The item I am looking at would be the schema. It is different in the
              Russian Church now as most monks it would not even be visible, but worn
              under the cassock. That was not true in period. Period iconography (at
              least a partial source for this) shows St. Cyril in the schema, as do those
              of St. Sergius. The modesty of the garb is something I'm aiming for, but
              this item would be part of the habit that would be possessed by any monk

              In Service,
              Chernst Ivan
            • LiudmilaV@aol.com
              In a message dated 3/12/2003 9:37:45 AM Pacific Standard Time, ... But none of them belonged to plain chernets. Pearled items were worn by higher order
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 12, 2003
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                In a message dated 3/12/2003 9:37:45 AM Pacific Standard Time,
                jenne@... writes:


                > On the other hand, embroidery on religious clothing is very easy to
                > document in period-- in fact, almost all the extant examples we have are
                > religious clothing.
                >

                But none of them belonged to plain "chernets." Pearled items were worn by
                higher order priesthood, and it is unlikely that a simple monk would wear
                anything like those surviving items.

                Liudmila


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Anthony J. Bryant
                ... Ummm.... Okay, I know about persona and all but... um.... As an Orthodox Christian, and a former seminarian, I would be *EXTREMELY UNCOMFORTABLE* with
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 13, 2003
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                  Chernst Ivan wrote:

                  >
                  > The item I am looking at would be the schema. It is different in the
                  > Russian Church now as most monks it would not even be visible, but worn
                  > under the cassock. That was not true in period. Period iconography (at
                  > least a partial source for this) shows St. Cyril in the schema, as do those
                  > of St. Sergius. The modesty of the garb is something I'm aiming for, but
                  > this item would be part of the habit that would be possessed by any monk

                  Ummm....


                  Okay, I know about persona and all but... um....

                  As an Orthodox Christian, and a former seminarian, I would be *EXTREMELY UNCOMFORTABLE* with someone who isn't a *real*
                  monk wearing a Schema. These days actors playing monks and priests tend to get permission from their bishops just to be
                  "on the safe side." But I would be seriously offended by a non Orthodox, non monastic, wearing the symbol of his oath of
                  faith. And I'd be doubly offended if I saw such a person behaving in *any* but the highest propriety and away from the
                  center of action. Schema-monks are not the kind of people you would see walking around town.

                  Effingham
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