Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [sig] Russian name query

Expand Messages
  • Jenn Ridley
    On Wed, 12 Mar 2003 16:06:56 +0100, Alastair Millar ... From the Greek Demeter via Demetrius , a 4th(?) century martyr, afaik. jenn (remember that from
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 12, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      On Wed, 12 Mar 2003 16:06:56 +0100, "Alastair Millar"
      <alastair@...> wrote:

      >OK, well out of my own are, but... out of interest, could Paul or someone
      >with Paul's book to hand exlain the origins of the name Dmitri please?
      >
      >I ask simply because rather to my surprise I've just come across a Czech
      >'Dmitr' from 1262, the first time I've seen it here.

      From the Greek 'Demeter' via 'Demetrius', a 4th(?) century martyr,
      afaik.

      jenn (remember that from family tree work (dad's name is Dimitri))
      --
      Anastasia Emilianova
      Jenn Ridley
      jridley@...
    • Yana
      ... Well, if you want a real impetus, try finding Ilyana. After all, documenting my original name was the start of the Russian Names project... --Yana,
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 12, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        >Alastair
        >Still smug about finally tracking down a Czech Pr'edslava


        Well, if you want a real impetus, try finding "Ilyana." After all,
        documenting my original name was the start of the Russian Names project...

        --Yana, happy to be inspiring
      • MHoll@aol.com
        In a message dated 3/12/2003 5:23:02 PM Central Standard Time, yana@merr.com ... Why not! It s pinning down the language in which specific -slav and -slava
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 12, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          In a message dated 3/12/2003 5:23:02 PM Central Standard Time, yana@...
          writes:

          > >Alastair
          > >Still smug about finally tracking down a Czech Pr'edslava

          Why not! It's pinning down the language in which specific -slav and -slava
          names were used that's a problem. They don't seem to be completely
          interchangeable. Almost, but not quite.

          Predslava, the Russian
          Adding one more Slavic instance of her name to the collection.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Vaclav von Pressburg
          ... Not from Paul s book, but ... It s originally from Greek Dem├ętrios (where both e s are eta s). In later Greek eta became the same sound as iota --
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 13, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            On Wed, Mar 12, 2003 at 04:06:56PM +0100, Alastair Millar wrote:
            > OK, well out of my own are, but... out of interest, could Paul or someone
            > with Paul's book to hand exlain the origins of the name Dmitri please?
            >
            > I ask simply because rather to my surprise I've just come across a Czech
            > 'Dmitr' from 1262, the first time I've seen it here.

            Not from Paul's book, but ...

            It's originally from Greek Dem├ętrios (where both e's are eta's). In
            later Greek "eta" became the same sound as "iota" -- equivalent to
            an English long "ee".

            Greek words generally drop a final "-os" when borrowed into Slavic.
            From the form of this name I would guess that the first unaccented
            "i" as borrowed as the soft "yer" -- this would indicate that the
            borrowing occured while the "yers" were still vowels so we're
            talking (roughly) before eleventh century.

            --
            Waclaw von Pressburg Veritas liberabit uos
            vaclav@...
          • Vaclav von Pressburg
            ... I ve always assumed that it was from the Greek name Demetrios with the first (unaccented) e reduced to a yer in the borrowed form and the -os dropped
            Message 5 of 7 , May 21, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              On Wed, Mar 12, 2003 at 04:06:56PM +0100, Alastair Millar wrote:
              > OK, well out of my own are, but... out of interest, could Paul or someone
              > with Paul's book to hand exlain the origins of the name Dmitri please?
              >
              > I ask simply because rather to my surprise I've just come across a Czech
              > 'Dmitr' from 1262, the first time I've seen it here.
              >

              I've always assumed that it was from the Greek name 'Demetrios' with
              the first (unaccented) 'e' reduced to a yer in the borrowed form and
              the '-os' dropped as usual.

              --
              Waclaw von Pressburg Veritas liberabit uos
              vaclav@...
            • MHoll@aol.com
              In a message dated 5/21/2003 5:00:36 AM Central Daylight Time, ... Yes. Predslava. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 7 , May 21, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                In a message dated 5/21/2003 5:00:36 AM Central Daylight Time,
                vaclav@... writes:

                > I've always assumed that it was from the Greek name 'Demetrios' with
                > the first (unaccented) 'e' reduced to a yer in the borrowed form and
                > the '-os' dropped as usual.

                Yes.

                Predslava.


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.