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Re: [sig] New comer naming question

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  • xvlovercrimvx@aol.com
    Ah, spaseeba to Yeliz for the notes. I guess Misha would be placed in Novogrod. Another question:Would there be any Tataric influence with the clothing or did
    Message 1 of 20 , Mar 4, 2003
      Ah, spaseeba to Yeliz for the notes. I guess Misha would be placed in
      Novogrod. Another question:Would there be any Tataric influence with the
      clothing or did the Russian's keep their own sense of style in defiance to
      their Tatar rulers? I think I asked this question before, but just want to
      make sure. Any good places online for Russian information? Most of the stuff
      I have found is either high school oriented (either too vague or maybe
      misleading) or in Russian (And I don't read Cyrrilic or speak Russian).
      Thanks for the info everyone!

      Misha


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Elizabeth Lear
      ... There s a very nice SCA publication about 13 C Novgorod, reprinted online at http://www.geocities.com/ilyana7/novgorod/toc.html Also, Mistress Nicolaa put
      Message 2 of 20 , Mar 4, 2003
        > Would there be any Tataric influence with the
        > clothing or did the Russian's keep their own sense of style in defiance to
        > their Tatar rulers?
        > Misha

        There's a very nice SCA publication about 13 C Novgorod, reprinted
        online at http://www.geocities.com/ilyana7/novgorod/toc.html

        Also, Mistress Nicolaa put together a book on Novgorod in 1036 which
        you once were able to order from her. It was written for a local
        event.


        For a more general overview, heck out my costume lecture notes:
        http://indra.com/~eliz/SCA/costuming.txt

        Particularly, according to "A Cultural History of Russia" (details in
        the biblio):
        - The Moscow Court spoke Turkish in the 15th century.
        - By the end of the 17th century, approximately 17% of the Moscow
        aristocracy was Mongol.
        - Many Russian noblemen from the 15th to 17th centuries took Mongol
        surnames.

        (Personally, my persona is ostensibly Kiev circa 1450, and own
        wardrobe is Ukranian, Russian, and Mongol)

        -Yeliz
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