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rubakha question

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  • Patricia Hefner
    OK, if I take a piece of fabric and lay it out, how do I figure out how big to make the gores? Also, how do I figure out the measurement for the sleeves--how
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 18, 1999
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      OK, if I take a piece of fabric and lay it out, how do I figure out how big
      to make the gores? Also, how do I figure out the measurement for the
      sleeves--how do you make them fit the holes? My first "rubakha" was a
      t-tunic; I'd like to make another one after reading that terrific site on
      Kiev Rus costuming. Then I can get going on that navershnik.

      Dekuji!
      Isabelle

      patricia.hefner@...
    • Diane S. Sawyer
      ... I ve been known to measure from where I want the point of the gore to hit on me (usually my hip) to the ground, and make that the hypotenuse of the
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 18, 1999
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        --- Patricia Hefner <patricia.hefner@...>
        wrote:
        > From: "Patricia Hefner"
        > <patricia.hefner@...>
        >
        > OK, if I take a piece of fabric and lay it out, how
        > do I figure out how big
        > to make the gores?

        I've been known to measure from where I want the point
        of the gore to hit on me (usually my hip) to the
        ground, and make that the hypotenuse of the triangle
        to make the gore. How wide you make the triangle is
        up to you.

        Also, how do I figure out the
        > measurement for the
        > sleeves--how do you make them fit the holes?

        You don't, exactly... Rubahkas, as far as I can tell,
        were of rectangular construction. Cut the front and
        back and sew the gores to the sides. Sew the shoulder
        seam. Do the neckline however you usually do; it's a
        lot easier to work on before you get the sleeves on.


        Cut two rectangles of appropriate length and width for
        sleeves, and cut two squares (5"x5" would probably be
        okay). Cut the squares in half diagonally. These are
        your gussets. Sew one side of the square to the end
        of the sleeve (the end that will be attached to the
        body of the garment) so that the right angle is
        touching the sleeve. Do this on both sides of the
        sleeve.

        ______________
        \ | | / The triangles here are
        \| |/ the gussets.
        | |

        Fold the sleeve in half the long way, wrong sides
        together, to find the center point. Lay the center
        point on the shoulder seam, right sides together, and
        sew the sleeve to the body of the garment. Do this
        for both sleeves.

        Fold the body in half, right sides together, and sew
        up the sides. Hem the bottom and taper the sleeves as
        you wish and there you have it!

        My
        > first "rubakha" was a
        > t-tunic; I'd like to make another one after reading
        > that terrific site on
        > Kiev Rus costuming. Then I can get going on that
        > navershnik.
        >
        > Dekuji!
        > Isabelle
        >
        > patricia.hefner@...
        >

        Tasha
      • MHoll@xxx.xxx
        In a message dated 10/18/1999 5:17:46 AM Central Daylight Time, ... I made the rubakha from Giliarovskaia s book on costuming: she based the pattern on the one
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 18, 1999
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          In a message dated 10/18/1999 5:17:46 AM Central Daylight Time,
          patricia.hefner@... writes:

          > OK, if I take a piece of fabric and lay it out, how do I figure out how big
          > to make the gores? Also, how do I figure out the measurement for the
          > sleeves--how do you make them fit the holes?

          I made the rubakha from Giliarovskaia's book on costuming: she based the
          pattern on the one and only surviving period shirt. It's all straight lines.
          On my web site, I explain her system of measurement which allows adapting the
          pattern to anyone. With a garment as loose as the rubakha, you don't need
          to-the-1/4-in precision. The shirt is very nice and comfortable, and even
          easy to adapt for a fencing shirt.

          Go to:
          <A HREF="http://members.aol.com/Predslava/GiliarovskaiaPatterns.html">Pattern
          s and Instructions for Medieval Russian Costumes</A>
          (http://members.aol.com/Predslava/GiliarovskaiaPatterns.html)

          Predslava
        • Kies, Lisa
          I actually have instructions for making a rubakha (and calculating the size of the pattern pieces) almost ready to go. I ll have the text ready this evening.
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 18, 1999
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            I actually have instructions for making a rubakha (and calculating the size
            of the pattern pieces) almost ready to go. I'll have the text ready this
            evening. The pictures will take longer (I still haven't found a scanner
            available). It would be easier to understand with pictures but I think it
            will still work.

            Basically you just... Well I guess I don't have time to explain it now.
            Just give me a little more time and I'll get the next installment of my
            website up.

            Wishing she wasn't at work right now....
            Sofya la Rus

            -----Original Message-----
            From: "Patricia Hefner" <patricia.hefner@...>

            OK, if I take a piece of fabric and lay it out, how do I figure out how
            big to make the gores? Also, how do I figure out the measurement for the
            sleeves--how do you make them fit the holes? My first "rubakha" was a
            t-tunic; I'd like to make another one after reading that terrific site
            on Kiev Rus costuming. Then I can get going on that navershnik.

            Dekuji!
            Isabelle

            patricia.hefner@...

            Slavic Interest Group homepage:
            http://www.uwplatt.edu/~goldschp/slavic.html
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