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Re: Re: [sig] Cyrillic question (OOP)

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  • Tat'ianna
    That is how you spell it in Ukrainian. Tat ianna
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 3, 2003
      That is how you spell it in Ukrainian.

      Tat'ianna
    • Tat'ianna
      But I thought it was pronounced Ke iv Tat ianna
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 3, 2003
        But I thought it was pronounced "Ke iv"

        Tat'ianna
      • MHoll@aol.com
        In a message dated 1/3/2003 5:09:35 PM Central Standard Time, ... It s Kiev in Russian [KEE-yehv], and Kiiv in Ukrainian [KEE-eev]. The way it actually sounds
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 3, 2003
          In a message dated 1/3/2003 5:09:35 PM Central Standard Time,
          tatianna_codlin@... writes:

          > But I thought it was pronounced "Ke iv"

          It's Kiev in Russian [KEE-yehv], and Kiiv in Ukrainian [KEE-eev]. The way it
          actually sounds when a Russian says it or a Ukrainian isn't very different to
          a foreign ear.

          Predslava.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Tat'ianna
          That is right, I just couldn t figure out how to spell it to pronounce it. Tat ianna ... From: To: Sent: Friday, January
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 3, 2003
            That is right, I just couldn't figure out how to spell it to pronounce it.

            Tat'ianna

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <MHoll@...>
            To: <sig@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, January 03, 2003 16:38
            Subject: Re: [sig] Cyrillic question (OOP)


            > In a message dated 1/3/2003 5:09:35 PM Central Standard Time,
            > tatianna_codlin@... writes:
            >
            > > But I thought it was pronounced "Ke iv"
            >
            > It's Kiev in Russian [KEE-yehv], and Kiiv in Ukrainian [KEE-eev]. The way
            it
            > actually sounds when a Russian says it or a Ukrainian isn't very different
            to
            > a foreign ear.
            >
            > Predslava.
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
          • Alexey Kiyaikin
            Greetings! ... Or, to be precise, Ukrainian, unlike Russian, has TWO /i/ sounds and two letters to mark them. The latin letter marks the same sound as in
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 4, 2003
              Greetings!
              >
              > It's Kiev in Russian [KEE-yehv], and Kiiv in Ukrainian [KEE-eev]. The way it
              > actually sounds when a Russian says it or a Ukrainian isn't very different to
              > a foreign ear.

              Or, to be precise, Ukrainian, unlike Russian, has TWO /i/ sounds and
              two letters to mark them. The
              "latin" letter marks the same sound as in Russian, that makes the
              preceding consonant soft. The "russian-style" letter, on the contrary,
              makes the sound that corresponds with the Russian sound /y/ (as in
              the Russian words "mysh'"-mouse, "syr"-cheese, etc), that does NOT
              make the preceding vowel soft. That makes the fact that the words with
              the "russian-style letter" (usually with the same spelling) look the
              same but sound differently. That difference has ever created lots of
              funny stories.

              bye,
              Alex.
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