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Re: [sig] Another Hungarian site ?

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  • varju@aol.com
    You might try _Art of the Conquest Era_ by Gyula Laszlo. It deals with grave finds from throughout Hungary starting with Gothic finds up to Magyar grave
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 31, 2002
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      You might try _Art of the Conquest Era_ by Gyula Laszlo. It deals with grave
      finds from throughout Hungary starting with Gothic finds up to Magyar grave
      finds. Much of it has to do with metal work.

      A good website to try is http://origo.hnm.hu/gyujtem/angol.html which is the
      online collection for the Hungarian National Museum. If you go to the link
      for the Medieval Collection, the first seven links are for Conquest Era
      Magyar items.

      Another website with some good color pictures is
      http://www.geocities.com/indunna/magars.html under the Accessories link. You
      may need to cross reference those pictures with other sources to find out the
      dates however.

      Hope that helps!

      Noemi


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • khalja
      Greetings, This is rather long, and I apologize. I tend to get carried away when researching conquest era hungarian stuff. My Ancient Hungarians book has
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 1, 2002
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        Greetings,

        This is rather long, and I apologize. I tend to get carried away
        when researching conquest era hungarian stuff.

        My "Ancient Hungarians" book has this to say about sheaths:

        The scabbard was generally made of wood and fitted together from two
        parts. An iron or bronze chape was fitted to its lower end. On
        more ornate weapons, the chape was of silver or gold. Most chapes
        were oval. A unique, buitton-terminalled chape can be seen on the
        sabre kept in Vienna that had been a princely insignia of rank. The
        semicircular suspension loops were riveted to the scabbard by means
        of two metal bands or, more rarely, a fairly wide plaque. The upper
        suspension loop also acted as the mount of the scabbard entry the
        scabbard and the grip were both covered with fine leather.

        I've uploaded a photo of the Vienna sabre - aka Attila's or
        Charlemagne's sword. (Which it isn't actually. Very obviously a
        conquest era sword.)

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sig/files/khalja/sabre.jpg

        Description of sword and scabbard from "Ancient Hungarians"

        "The hilt curves towards the blade edge. The iron cross-bar is
        covered with a gold plaque decorated with an intricate design of
        tendrils and leaves around a four-petalled rosette in the centre.
        The grip was riveted to the iron tang. It was first covered with
        leather, on to which the gold ring and the pear-shaped pommel were
        fitted. These plaques are ornamented with an interlace pattern of
        looped tendrils and palmettes. The hilt was repaired in the Middle
        Ages. The cross-bar was fitted onto the dismantled grip upside-down
        and the damaged grip reinforced with three silver gild bands, two of
        which are set with stone inlays. [Note from Khalja - If you want I
        can scan a black and white photo of the repair job from another
        book - "Art of the Migration Era"]

        The 86.4 cm long wooden scabbard was first covered with black
        leather. It has two semicircular suspension loops, one at the
        scabbard entry, the other halfway down the scabbard. A knob
        terminalled chape was then attached to the scabbard. The part of
        the scabbard between the chape ring and the lower suspension loop
        was covered with a plain gold plaque whose edges were riveted to a
        silver plaque on the reverse. The front side of the suspension
        loops and both sides of the chape are decorated with a pattern of
        looped double scrolls and palmettes. The suspension loops are
        bordered with a spiralling tendril. The grip and the scabbard are
        decorated with a pattern of looped tendrils executed in repousse and
        set against a background of tiny punched circles."

        Another idea for scabbard decoration if you were interested in
        leather carving, is from a conquest era saddle. I've uploaded a
        drawing from "Art of the Migration Era" here:

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sig/files/khalja/saddle.jpg

        Sabretaches and belt ends can also be sources of design inspiration.

        I hope this is helpful. I have photos of several other sabres with
        keen metal bits, so let me know if you'd like to see them. Also
        lots of stuff on different sabretache plates and belt designs.

        Cheers,
        Baroness Khalja khorkhoi
      • drobnock2
        Thank you, did a quick visit this AM. Looks helpful. Janos ... the Medieval Collection, the first seven links are for Conquest Era
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 1, 2002
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          Thank you, did a quick visit this AM. Looks helpful.
          Janos


          --- In sig@y..., varju@a... wrote:
          > You might try _Art of the Conquest Era_ by Gyula Laszlo. .......or
          the Medieval Collection, the first seven links are for Conquest
          Era
          > Magyar items.
          >
          > >
          > Hope that helps!
          >
          > Noemi
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • drobnock2
          ... Thank you. It is interesting to compare the designs. The basic construction of the wood sheath during the middle ages is similar. Maybe more on this
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 4, 2002
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            --- In sig@y..., "khalja" <khalja@y...> wrote:
            > Greetings,
            >
            > This is rather long, and I apologize. I tend to get carried away
            > when researching conquest era hungarian stuff.
            >
            > My "Ancient Hungarians" book has this to say about sheaths:
            >
            > lots of stuff on different sabretache plates and belt designs.
            >
            > Cheers,
            > Baroness Khalja khorkhoi

            Thank you.
            It is interesting to compare the designs. The basic construction of
            the wood sheath during the middle ages is similar. Maybe more on this
            later.
            Janos
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