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Russian? swear word

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  • ssaucer@juno.com
    [snip] ... [snip] ... Oooo, that s the only swear word I learned from my Polish grandparents! Of course, Poland was Russia at the time they emigrated, so maybe
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 8, 2002
      [snip]

      > Finally, "zhopa" is quite a bit stronger than "ass" (as "asshole" is
      > stronger
      > than "ass").

      [snip]

      > Also, as it could be pronounced as dupa

      Oooo, that's the only swear word I learned from my Polish grandparents!
      Of course, Poland was Russia at the time they emigrated, so maybe it was
      a Russian swear word, and not Polish?

      Ilijana Krakowska
    • Shadow42
      ... Today I saw a bumper sticker that said you bet your DUPA I m Polish! So maybe it s not that unacceptable. Laura
      Message 2 of 13 , Oct 8, 2002
        ssaucer@... wrote:

        >
        >[snip]
        >
        >>Finally, "zhopa" is quite a bit stronger than "ass" (as "asshole" is
        >>stronger
        >>than "ass").
        >>
        >
        >[snip]
        >
        >>Also, as it could be pronounced as dupa
        >>
        >
        >Oooo, that's the only swear word I learned from my Polish grandparents!
        >Of course, Poland was Russia at the time they emigrated, so maybe it was
        >a Russian swear word, and not Polish?
        >
        >Ilijana Krakowska
        >
        Today I saw a bumper sticker that said "you bet your DUPA I"m Polish!"
        So maybe it's not that unacceptable.

        Laura
      • MHoll@aol.com
        ... It s Polish, not Russian. We need a native Polish speaker to tell us how rude it is. Predslava.
        Message 3 of 13 , Oct 9, 2002
          In a message dated 10/8/2002 8:00:10 PM Eastern Standard Time, shadow42@... writes:

          > Today I saw a bumper sticker that said "you bet your DUPA
          > I"m Polish!"
          > So maybe it's not that unacceptable.

          It's Polish, not Russian. We need a native Polish speaker to tell us how rude it is.

          Predslava.
        • pan_landolf
          While I not a native speaker of Polish, I do have reason to believe dupa is not much worse than butt . A military friend of mine, stationed in Berlin, was
          Message 4 of 13 , Oct 9, 2002
            While I not a native speaker of Polish, I do have reason to
            believe 'dupa' is not much worse than 'butt'.
            A military friend of mine, stationed in Berlin, was riding the U-bahn
            with another Polish linguist. They were watching the derriere of a
            pretty girl and the first one nudged the second one and
            said, "Smaczna dupa." He meant 'nice butt'. As the young lady
            exited the car she turned to the two and said, "Dzienkuje."(Thanks)
            I think if it had been a very bad word and she obviously understood
            what he said, she would not have responded so pleasantly.

            Landolf

            --- In sig@y..., MHoll@a... wrote:
            > In a message dated 10/8/2002 8:00:10 PM Eastern Standard Time,
            shadow42@e... writes:
            >
            > > Today I saw a bumper sticker that said "you bet your DUPA
            > > I"m Polish!"
            > > So maybe it's not that unacceptable.
            >
            > It's Polish, not Russian. We need a native Polish speaker to tell
            us how rude it is.
            >
            > Predslava.
          • MHoll@aol.com
            In a message dated 10/9/2002 11:34:24 AM Central Daylight Time, ... Yeah, watch your language(s) in Europe. I had a similar adventure, except it was me exiting
            Message 5 of 13 , Oct 9, 2002
              In a message dated 10/9/2002 11:34:24 AM Central Daylight Time,
              pan_landolf@... writes:


              > They were watching the derriere of a
              > pretty girl and the first one nudged the second one and
              > said, "Smaczna dupa." He meant 'nice butt'. As the young lady
              > exited the car she turned to the two and said, "Dzienkuje."(Thanks)

              Yeah, watch your language(s) in Europe. I had a similar adventure, except it
              was me exiting and wishing a good day to a group of little old ladies
              criticising "today's youth". (OK, so I was on my way to a costume party).

              Predslava


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • prosectorx
              WARNING! Below is a sort of overview of certain Slavic terms referring to certain areas of human body. Proceed at your own risk of getting offended, I merely
              Message 6 of 13 , Oct 10, 2002
                WARNING! Below is a sort of overview of certain Slavic terms
                referring to certain areas of human body. Proceed at your own risk
                of getting offended, I merely post info as a linguist.

                --- In sig@y..., ssaucer@j... wrote:
                > [snip]
                > > Finally, "zhopa" is quite a bit stronger than "ass" (as "asshole"
                is stronger than "ass").
                > [snip]
                >
                > > Also, as it could be pronounced as dupa
                > Oooo, that's the only swear word I learned from my Polish
                grandparents! Of course, Poland was Russia at the time they
                emigrated, so maybe it was a Russian swear word, and not Polish?
                >
                > Ilijana Krakowska

                Here's my take on this: in modern Slavic languages, "zhopa" is used
                in Russian as a not-so-nice, although not the worst, curse word.
                Same applies to Ukrainian, especially in Eastern and Central
                Ukraine. In Western Ukraine, "dupa" seems to be used more - in fact,
                in Eastern Ukraine, some people may simply not understand what you're
                talking about when you refer to someone's "dupa" (and I don't think
                this word exists in Russian, at least I haven't heard it used by
                anybody speaking Russian). In Ukraine, some consider it to be a
                Polonism (especially when it's used by Ukrainian diaspora). No
                surprise, it's used in Polish, but I can't state how harsh of a curse
                it's in that language. I haven't heard the word "dupa" from either
                Czechs, or Slovaks. Czech has "zad/zadek" (in "nice ass"
                connotation) and "prdel/prdelka" which is either somewhat harsh or
                quite harsh. The latter word is related to certain Ukrainian &
                Russian words (I won't go into details, but they're neither very
                harsh, nor used at the table).

                Back to Russian: not harsh at all is "zad" and "popa", a bit more
                harsher (as I've heard it being used) is "zadnitsa".

                And if anyone wonders, no, I have not written any theses on this
                subject;-)
              • Alexey Kiyaikin
                Greetings! Sorry for remaining on that fruity subject, buut who can deal with strong words but the philologists... The word dupa was widely used by a fashioned
                Message 7 of 13 , Oct 10, 2002
                  Greetings!

                  Sorry for remaining on that fruity subject, buut who can deal with
                  strong words but the philologists...

                  The word dupa was widely used by a fashioned fantasy author Yuri
                  Nikitin, with no misunderstanding from the readers' part. Though, it
                  works right as an euphemism.

                  > Back to Russian: not harsh at all is "zad" and "popa", a bit more
                  > harsher (as I've heard it being used) is "zadnitsa".

                  Some corrections: zad and zadnitsa are about the same level of
                  expression, though zad is closer to "back" (opposite the front), while
                  zadnitsa is closer to "butt". Zadnitsa referring to people (this
                  meaning only!!!) is translated exactly as "asshole". Popa is used by
                  no adult people(I mean used seriously), it was invented for use by
                  children and those who supervise them. BTW, in ex-USSR (not sure if in
                  Russia) 10-12 years ago they issued a Russian-English dictionary of tabooed lexics.
                  Disgusting choice of words. The word popa was included, God knows why.
                  Can't guess how many non-Russians were deceived by that dictionary.

                  bye,
                  Alex
                • Alastair Millar
                  prosectorx writes... ... Dupa is not a Czech word. ... No. Zad is not a word in Czech. Czech has zada (the first a is long) which means back (in more
                  Message 8 of 13 , Oct 11, 2002
                    "prosectorx" writes...

                    > I haven't heard the word "dupa" from either
                    > Czechs, or Slovaks.

                    Dupa is not a Czech word.

                    >Czech has "zad/zadek" (in "nice ass" connotation)

                    No.
                    "Zad" is not a word in Czech. Czech has "zada" (the first 'a' is long)
                    which means back (in more or less any sense), and zadek (short 'a') which
                    means backside, derriere or rear - but which is far milder even than "butt"
                    in English.

                    >and "prdel/prdelka" which is either somewhat harsh or
                    >quite harsh.

                    "Prdel" is harsh - roughly equivalent to "arse" in English. "Prdelka",
                    however, is a diminutive, and is not so harsh - most dictionaries would
                    give you "butt" or "fanny" (in the American not British sense!!!) I think -
                    I would check, but I'm not in the office.

                    Alastair

                    ---------------------------
                    Alastair Millar, BSc(Hons) - alastair@...
                    Consultancy and translation for the heritage industry
                    P.O.Box 11, CZ 413 01 Roudnice, Czech Republic
                  • Shadow42
                    ... Thanks everyone for the educational posts! Maybe I ll just use the phrase He sat on his bum. British slang seems to be acceptable for English-speaking
                    Message 9 of 13 , Oct 12, 2002
                      Alastair Millar wrote:

                      >>
                      >
                      >"Prdel" is harsh - roughly equivalent to "arse" in English. "Prdelka",
                      >however, is a diminutive, and is not so harsh - most dictionaries would
                      >give you "butt" or "fanny" (in the American not British sense!!!) I think -
                      >I would check, but I'm not in the office.
                      >
                      Thanks everyone for the educational posts!
                      Maybe I"ll just use the phrase "He sat on his bum."
                      British slang seems to be acceptable for English-speaking writers to
                      use no matter what the historical period, just so the phrases won't
                      sound "contemporary". Just like British accents seem to work in any
                      historical movie, including Egyptians.

                      GRIN!

                      Laura
                    • Art Plazewski
                      ... us how rude it is. ... Would you say ass while eating dinner with your grandma? It is considered not polite to use word dupa on any occasion...Much
                      Message 10 of 13 , Oct 16, 2002
                        --- In sig@y..., MHoll@a... wrote:
                        > In a message dated 10/8/2002 8:00:10 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                        shadow42@e... writes:
                        >
                        > > Today I saw a bumper sticker that said "you bet your DUPA
                        > > I"m Polish!"
                        > > So maybe it's not that unacceptable.
                        >
                        > It's Polish, not Russian. We need a native Polish speaker to tell
                        us how rude it is.
                        >
                        > Predslava.

                        Would you say "ass" while eating dinner with your grandma?
                        It is considered not polite to use word "dupa" on any
                        occasion...Much milder word is "tyl/ek" ( butt , behind) …
                        Art.
                      • Art Plazewski
                        ... Like I said it is equivalent of ass ... bahn ... said, Dzienkuje. (Thanks) Direct translation is : tasty ass - it is slang and means in fact nice
                        Message 11 of 13 , Oct 16, 2002
                          --- In sig@y..., "pan_landolf" <pan_landolf@h...> wrote:
                          > While I not a native speaker of Polish, I do have reason to
                          > believe 'dupa' is not much worse than 'butt'.

                          Like I said it is equivalent of "ass"

                          > A military friend of mine, stationed in Berlin, was riding the U-
                          bahn
                          > with another Polish linguist. They were watching the derriere of a
                          > pretty girl and the first one nudged the second one and
                          > said, "Smaczna dupa." He meant 'nice butt'. As the young lady
                          > exited the car she turned to the two and
                          said, "Dzienkuje."(Thanks)

                          Direct translation is : "tasty ass" - it is slang and means in
                          fact "nice ass" but little bit more then that too..

                          > I think if it had been a very bad word and she obviously understood
                          > what he said, she would not have responded so pleasantly.
                          >
                          > Landolf

                          She obviously had some sense of houmor...
                          ;-)))
                          Art.
                        • Kuzniar, Wendy
                          I m finding all this about the word dupa very interesting, does anyone know if the useage has changed in the past 20 or more years? - It was commonly used by
                          Message 12 of 13 , Oct 16, 2002
                            I'm finding all this about the word dupa very interesting, does anyone know
                            if the useage has changed in the past 20 or more years? - It was commonly
                            used by my Polish Grandparents around us kids when we were little (move your
                            dupa), and they didn't swear around us at all. My Grandparents were 1st
                            generation (some of their sibings born in Poland, others probably conceived
                            on the boat on the way over here)...

                            just a little odd....

                            Nezkha

                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: Art Plazewski [mailto:artplazewski@...]
                            Sent: Wednesday, October 16, 2002 1:37 PM
                            To: sig@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [sig] Re: Russian? swear word


                            --- In sig@y..., MHoll@a... wrote:
                            > In a message dated 10/8/2002 8:00:10 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                            shadow42@e... writes:
                            >
                            > > Today I saw a bumper sticker that said "you bet your DUPA
                            > > I"m Polish!"
                            > > So maybe it's not that unacceptable.
                            >
                            > It's Polish, not Russian. We need a native Polish speaker to tell
                            us how rude it is.
                            >
                            > Predslava.

                            Would you say "ass" while eating dinner with your grandma?
                            It is considered not polite to use word "dupa" on any
                            occasion...Much milder word is "tyl/ek" ( butt , behind) ...
                            Art.




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                          • Art Plazewski
                            ... anyone know ... cut ... Usage did not changed in the past 300 years...;-))) Art.
                            Message 13 of 13 , Oct 16, 2002
                              --- In sig@y..., "Kuzniar, Wendy" <Wendy.Kuzniar@p...> wrote:
                              > I'm finding all this about the word dupa very interesting, does
                              anyone know
                              > if the useage has changed in the past 20 or more years?

                              cut

                              >
                              > Nezkha
                              >

                              Usage did not changed in the past 300 years...;-)))
                              Art.
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