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Polish/Russian marriage customs

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  • MoxFool@aol.com
    Was it the custom of Polish women to take their husbands last name when they were married? And what about Russians? Zygmunt Omnes Venerari, Nullos Temere Tom
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 7, 2002
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      Was it the custom of Polish women to take their husbands' last name when they
      were married? And what about Russians?

      Zygmunt


      Omnes Venerari, Nullos Temere

      Tom Nadratowski <A HREF="http://www.footballguys.com">Footballguys.com</A>


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    • MHoll@aol.com
      I can t answer about Polish customs, but since Russians didn t use last names in period (as we know them -- i.e. family/hereditary names), the answer is no.
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 7, 2002
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        I can't answer about Polish customs, but since Russians didn't use last names
        in period (as we know them -- i.e. family/hereditary names), the answer is
        no. Married women in Russia would be known maybe by their first names, but
        more likely by their patronymics and/or their "wife-of" names. The former is
        quite widespread (for instance Igor's wife in THE SONG/LAY OF IGOR'S CAMPAIGN
        is forever known as Iaroslavna, i.e. Iaroslav's daughter).

        The later ("wife-of" form) can be found fairly often in the Birch-Bark
        letters, but I don't remember off the top of my head whether it was common in
        Russia other than Novgorod.

        As an example: take the name IVAN. IVANOVA is the patronymic (to someone
        knowing modern Russian it looks like a last (family) name, but it isn't in
        period); IVANIAIA is the "wife-of" form.

        As far as persona-play, it's a matter of choice. I haven't seen any pattern
        to the practice. I suspect whether a woman is known by her patronymic or a
        wife-of form depends on who's more famous -- father or husband. OTOH, a woman
        could also be famous on her own. Princess Olga is know as Olga, to the point
        that her patronymic eludes most Russians. Marfa Posadnitsa (Martha the
        Mayoress), in XV-C Novgorod is known by her own name, even though she
        "inherited" her husband's post as mayor (posadnik) of Novogorod.

        There is more on this in the DICTIONARY OF PERIOD RUSSIAN NAMES, linked from
        the SIG pages.

        Predslava Vydrina

        Per fess embattled Azure and Gules, two otters passant Or.
        <A HREF="http://slavic.freeservers.com/">SLAVIC INTEREST GROUP</A> http://slavic.freeservers.com


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