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Re: [sig] sarafan hassles, pt. II

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  • Diane Sawyer
    ... So... you re left with your ankles hanging out? What do you wear for footwear, then? Tasha __________________________________________________ Do You
    Message 1 of 12 , May 11, 2002
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      --- Elizabeth Lear <eliz@...> wrote:
      > > Then do you have the rubahka hanging down at the
      > > bottom?
      > > Tasha
      >
      > Nope, I have two lengths of rubahkas, hip-length and
      > knee-or-calf
      > length. My petticoats are also lower-calf-length.
      >
      > -Yeliz

      So... you're left with your ankles hanging out? What
      do you wear for footwear, then?

      Tasha


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    • Elizabeth Lear
      ... Either boots (usually) or sandals (if it s hot and the terrain isn t too bad). -Yeliz
      Message 2 of 12 , May 11, 2002
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        > So... you're left with your ankles hanging out? What
        > do you wear for footwear, then?
        > Tasha

        Either boots (usually) or sandals (if it's hot and the terrain isn't
        too bad).

        -Yeliz
      • Patricia Hefner
        ... When I made my first rubakha it was actually more like a chemise. It was for summer and hot weather, like much of the garb worn by Meridian ladies. I m
        Message 3 of 12 , May 11, 2002
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          > But... if you follow Dak's garb packet, they come
          > > out waist-length... So
          > > which is "correct"?
          > {snip}
          > > Parsla
          >
          > One of 'em does, one of 'em doesn't. Wouldn't you
          > look funny wearing a waist-or-slightly-longer
          > rubahka
          > with a panova? Besides, the cut is so common, that
          > if
          > you make an ankle-length rubahka you can wear it
          > with
          > at least two other outfits that I can think of (the
          > Anglo-Saxon tube dress and the Norse apron dress
          > immediately spring to mind).
          >
          > Tasha
          > who was never able to satisfactorily gather that
          > much
          > linen into a neckband, anyway.

          When I made my first "rubakha" it was actually more
          like a chemise. It was for summer and hot weather,
          like much of the garb worn by Meridian ladies. I'm
          going to be making some other garb after we do our
          event and I have the time. I've never made a panova. I
          can't quite figure out how to make one, but I'd like
          to. I'd also like to have at least one Viking outfit.
          BTW is yellow period? I have some yellow fabric. I'm
          trying to figure out if there's anything I can do with
          it.

          Isabelle

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        • Alexey Kiyaikin aka Posadnik
          ... From: Parsla Liepa To: Date: Sat, 11 May 2002 10:21:58 -0400 (EDT) Subject: Re: [sig] sarafan hassles, pt.
          Message 4 of 12 , May 12, 2002
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            -----Original Message-----
            From: Parsla Liepa <pliepa@...>
            To: <sig@yahoogroups.com>
            Date: Sat, 11 May 2002 10:21:58 -0400 (EDT)
            Subject: Re: [sig] sarafan hassles, pt. II

            > ATTACHMENT: text/html
            >
            Greetings all!

            About the length of rubakhas.

            Once I got the book by Russian Folk Art Museum on embroidery, I came across the
            fact that those (censored) scientists preserved only those parts of the shirts
            that bore embroidery. Once the catalogue photo shows a detail of a shoulder
            piece, cut out with a poair of scissors, as the image lets see. Same damn stuff
            with some rubakhas, that are shown cut about/a little above waist. That may be
            the reason, I'm 75% sure.

            About Sarafans.

            Though some folk costume scholars refer to the Scandinavian two-piece
            "sarafan", sarafan is usually referred to 14 century, and to northern half of
            European Russia mostly (Ukraine & Southern Russia wore shirt & skirt
            (Plakhta)). BTW, "traditional sarafan" really looks more like the corresponding
            Korean dress, than the, say, Norman one.

            bye,
            Alex.
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