Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Eggs Again

Expand Messages
  • eclipsek
    Greetings, I tracked down an odd reference for wax resist eggs. I m not sure if it s valid yet - I haven t had time to check, but I thought I d share (see
    Message 1 of 2 , May 8, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings,
      I tracked down an odd reference for wax resist eggs. I'm not sure if
      it's valid yet - I haven't had time to check, but I thought I'd share
      (see below).
      -Kataryna

      Excepts are from a web article
      http://www.geocities.com/oakheart_2000/art/Pysanky.html
      The book reference is unchecked.

      "The tradition of placing eggs as symbolic offerings in graves was
      practiced in European countries. In Germany (Gernsheim near Worms), two
      ornamented goose eggs were found in the stone grave of a young woman.
      Judging by the gold coins found there as well (from the time of
      Constantine the Great), the grave is from 320 A.D. According to one
      researcher, the girl had died at Easter. The two goose eggs are
      decorated with solid black and brown bands, as well as with bands of
      green with superimposed spots."
      - "Rusyn Easter Eggs from Eastern Slovakia" by Pavlo
      Markovyc, translated by Marta Skorupsky (Wilhelm Braumuller
      Universitats-Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1987, published under the auspices of
      the Carpatho-Rusyn Research Center)

      and from the same article:

      "Polish archaeologists found the shells of painted eggs in Opole during
      excavations of this site between 1952 and 1956. One of the eggs survived
      intact. Ethnographers have established their date as the tenth century
      A.D. on the basis of the wax technique used in their ornamentation. The
      ornament on the Opole decorated eggs is similar to the contemporary
      designs used in Polish and Slavic pysanky in general. For the most part,
      it belongs to the linear geometric category. The pysanky are dyed
      chestnut (castaneus), dark brown (brunneus), violet (sordide violaceus),
      and bronze (nocitineus). In some instances, the ornamental motifs are
      executed in light yellow shade, while in others they are produced by
      leaving the egg shell undyed."

      -"Rusyn Easter Eggs from Eastern Slovakia" by Pavlo Markovyc,
      translated by Marta Skorupsky (Wilhelm Braumuller
      Universitats-Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1987, published under the auspices of
      the Carpatho-Rusyn Research Center)
    • eclipsek
      I also found another list of natural dyes - I haven t tried them yet. Yellow - Wild apple bark, onion skin, buckwheat husks. campion, or the flowers of dog s
      Message 2 of 2 , May 8, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        I also found another list of natural dyes - I haven't tried them yet.
        Yellow - Wild apple bark, onion skin, buckwheat husks. campion, or
        the flowers of dog's fennel.
        Green - sunflower seeds, wild elder berries, dark red or black
        hollyhocks, bush anemones, birch, and mosses.
        Dark Yellow - Alder buds, hazel ot chestnut leaves, walnut and apple
        leaves, or oak bark.
        Black - Sunflower seed husks + sulphate iron, bark of alder, young
        leaves of black maple.

        From "Pysanka: Icon of the Universe"; Tkachuk, Mary, Marie Kishchuk,
        and Alice Nicholaichuk; Ottawa: U.W.A.C and National Museum Canada, 1977.
        -Kataryna
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.